AccueilWomen, Gender and the Extreme Right 1919-45

Women, Gender and the Extreme Right 1919-45

Women, Gender and the Extreme Right in Europe 1919-45

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Publié le vendredi 21 juillet 2000 par Marin Dacos

Résumé

CALL FOR PAPERS Wednesday 4 July to Friday 6 July 2001 CONFERENCE The study of women, gender and the extreme right lies at the confluence of two major areas of scholarly interest, and this conference is intended as a

Annonce

CALL FOR PAPERS


Wednesday 4 July to Friday 6 July 2001


CONFERENCE

The study of women, gender and the extreme right lies at the confluence of two major areas of scholarly interest, and this conference is intended as a contribution to both. It will re-evaluate the history of women and gender in the light of contemporary approaches to the extreme right, and re-evaluate the history of the extreme right in the light of recent approaches to women and gender.It will examine the place of antifeminist discourses within the extreme right and the paradox of female engagement within deeply misogynist movements; the differences, if any, between fascist and non-fascist movements of the extreme right regarding women and gender; the relationships between conceptions of national identity, gender, right-wing antifeminism and women's engagement in movements and regimes of the extreme right.

Plenary speakers will present critical overviews on women, gender and the extreme right in Germany, Italy, Spain, France, Britain, Hungary, Romania, Yugoslavia, Latvia and Poland.

Panels will provide an opportunity to present papers on more specialised aspects of the topics.


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Plenary Speakers
Italy: Perry Willson, University of Edinburgh (Abstract)
Germany: Kirsten Heinsohn, University of Hamburg (Abstract)
Romania: Maria Bucur, Indiana University (Abstract)
Hungary: Mária M Kovács, Central European University (Abstract)
Spain: Mary Vincent, University of Sheffield (Abstract)
Britain: Martin Durham, University of Wolverhampton (Abstract)
Poland: Dobrochna Kalwa, Jagiellonian University, Poland (Abstract)
France: Cheryl Koos, California State University and Daniella Sarnoff, Boston College (Abstract)
Serbia and Croatia: Melissa Bokovoy, University of New Mexico and Carol Lilly, University of Nebraska at Kearney (Abstract)
Latvia: Mara L. Lazda, Indiana University (Abstract)
Comparative perspectives: Kevin Passmore, Cardiff University (Abstract)


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Panels


Applications are invited for the presentation of papers, in English, on any aspect of the topic women, gender and the extreme right in Europe (1919-1945). Papers will be of 20 minutes duration. Proposals for individual papers or for panels of up to three contributions will be considered. Potential participants should send an outline of their proposed paper (not more than 500 words) together with a short CV, to the conference organiser by no later than 1 October 2000.

The organisers will especially welcome proposals for papers on women, gender and fascism in countries other than Germany and Italy, but potential participants should not be deterred from submitting proposals for papers on the latter countries. Panel proposals that include papers on more than one country will also be welcomed.

Proposals should be sent to Kevin Passmore:
PO BOX 909, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF1 3XU, Wales
Email: wgf@cardiff.ac.uk
+44 029 20 87 56 54
Fax: +44 029 20 87 49 29

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Themes of the conference


The role of women in parties and regimes of the extreme right constitutes a significant test case for debates about whether women’s position in society and polity was largely constructed by patriarchal discourses and practices, or whether women possessed significant agency within a framework of unequal gender relations. In more concrete terms, some historians have seen the extreme right largely as a reaction against perceived gains by women during and after the Great War (greater access to paid employment and education, the vote in many countries). Historians who take this line tend to emphasise the extreme right’s reassertion of biology as the principal determinant of female destiny, and often concentrate on pronatalist discourses and policies. Other historians, without forgetting the virulent misogyny of the extreme right, have grappled with the problem of why women, including some feminists, should have been willing to participate in movements that were seemingly so inimical to their ‘interests’ as women. The debate about agency is closely related to another about whether in Germany non-Jewish women were as responsible as non-Jewish men for the Holocaust.

A second historiographical development which has impacted upon the study of women, gender and the extreme right is the growing interest in the relations between (or mutual construction of) gender, class, ethnic, religious, political and other identities. A number of historians have, for example, examined the ways in which Nazi ideals of femininity were conditioned by racism. The country by country structure of the conference represents an ideal opportunity to explore the manner in which different conceptions of nationhood and ethnicity in the various states of early twentieth-century Europe were related to discourses of femininity within movements of the extreme right.

Finally, the conference will contribute to the historiography of the extreme right and of fascism. Much of the recent work on theoretical approaches to the extreme right has consisted of re-workings of Weberian and Marxist approaches pioneered in the 1960s and 1970s. Both share the ambition to elucidate the precise relationships between right-wing extremism as a form of political ideology and the social conditions ‘necessary’ for its emergence. In the 1990s, under the influence of postmodernism, historians are more critical of attempts to determine ‘essential’ relationships between political discourses and social conditions. Above all (without abandoning the need for contextualisation) they have highlighted the way in which political movements ‘construct’ their own social bases. Studies of the political construction of gender identities have been in the forefront of this re-evaluation.

Fascism and the extreme right. Participants may consider both explicitly fascist and non-fascist movements and/or regimes of the extreme right. For example, Pilsudski’s dictatorship and the National Party opposition in Poland, the Vichy regime and Franco’s conservative dictatorship in Spain will all be considered. This will allow speakers to examine differences, if any, between different kinds of extreme-right movement in respect of women and gender.

Women and gender. The conference deliberately deals with ‘women and gender’. Clearly the idea of masculinity will figure in many contributions, if only implicitly. But the conference will not place the examination of masculinity at the core of its discussions.

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For further details contact Kevin Passmore:
PO BOX 909, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF1 3XU, Wales
Email: wgf@cardiff.ac.uk
+44 029 20 87 56 54
Fax: +44 029 20 87 49 29

Source: http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/hisar/people/kp/conference/


Lieux

  • Cardiff, Grande-Bretagne

Dates

  • dimanche 01 octobre 2000

Pour citer cette annonce

« Women, Gender and the Extreme Right 1919-45 », Appel à contribution, Calenda, Publié le vendredi 21 juillet 2000, http://calenda.org/185642