AccueilUtilisation and non-utilisation of public sector performance information. In search of real evidence

Utilisation and non-utilisation of public sector performance information. In search of real evidence

EGPA Study Group on productivity and quality in the public sector

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Publié le mardi 21 février 2006 par Natalie Petiteau

Résumé

Public administrations have been measuring performance for quite some time now. But is this information actually used, or is performance measurement mainly a ritualistic exercise detached from organisational reality and policy-making. This year’s call focuses on the utilisation of performance information: Who is (not) using performance measurement information, where, when, why and how?

Annonce

Conference of the European Group of Public Administration (EGPA)
6-9 September, 2006, Bocconi University, Milan, Italy

“Public Managers under Pressure: between Politics, Professionalism and Civil Society"


The EGPA Study Group on Productivity and Quality in the Public Sector studies aspects of public sector performance. Public sector performance topics in the past have included the use of trust and satisfaction indicators, case studies of organisational performance, measurement issues etc. In the period 2004-2007, the Study Group will focus on performance measurement systems. We study the way performance measurement systems are embedded in administrative and political systems.

Public administrations have been measuring performance for quite some time now. But is this information actually used, or is performance measurement mainly a ritualistic exercise detached from organisational reality and policy-making. This year’s call focuses on the utilisation of performance information: Who is (not) using performance measurement information, where, when, why and how?

The focus is not on the technicalities of measurement. We particularly encourage papers with a strong empirical focus. It would be good to have some real empirical evidence on the issues below. Papers may deal with utilisation of performance information in ministries, agencies or local governments, but may also focus on specific sectors (education, health …).

- For what purpose, and in what stages in the policy-cycle is performance information used? Do performance indicators have an impact on policy or management? Is there a direct impact, or do we find what Weiss calls a ‘knowledge creep’, a gradual awareness and incorporation of information?

- Who is using performance information? Is it possible for actors with a bounded rationality to absorb performance information in a meaningful way? Are citizens really interested in league tables, or is it just fun stuff for the press? How do user groups use public sector performance to guide their decisions? Do politicians use performance reports, or are they just creaming, looking for the interesting bits? Are targeted users of performance information sufficiently skilled to use the indicators, and do they interpret the indicators in a correct way?

- Why is the use of performance information common practice in some policy sectors and organisations, and why is this entirely novel in other? Why do certain countries have established traditions using performance indicators, while other countries hardly ever use them? What sectors or countries are we speaking about?

- Why is performance information considered an intra-organizational matter in some sectors or countries, and is transparent and active communication about the indicators common practice in other?

Practicalities

The EGPA Study Group on Productivity and Quality in the Public Sector was founded in 1986. It has mainly dealt with performance measurement issues. From 2001 to 2003, papers dealt with the question whether a well-functioning public sector will lead to satisfied customers and trusting citizens. Since 2004, the focus is on performance measurement and performance management. Papers from previous conferences have been published in symposia in and special issues of the International Journal of Public Administration, Public Performance and Management Review and the International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management.

Study Group website: http://www.kuleuven.ac.be/io/egpa.

Practical information on the EGPA 2006 conference, and the other study groups: www.egpa2006.com

Please submit a short abstract outlining

- the title of the paper

- a short description of the contents of the paper (maximum 1 page)

- the research method of your contribution, and the empirical material to be used

- name, affiliation, and contact information of the author(s)

The deadline for the abstracts is May 1st, 2006

Final acceptance will be notified by the end of May 2006.

Final papers are due by July 31st.

Papers will be made available on the Study Group Website. Due to time restraints, a maximum of 15 papers will be accepted. Paper presenters will be expected to prepare a short presentation and to act as a discussant for at least one other paper.

Please mail paper proposals in .doc, or .rtf format to the study group convenors:

Dr. Steven Van de Walle
Institute of Local Government Studies
School of Public Policy
University of Birmingham
Birmingham B15 2TT
United Kingdom
steven.vandewalle@soc.kuleuven.be

Dr. Wouter van Dooren
Public Management Institute
K.U.Leuven
Van Evenstraat 2A
3000 Leuven
Belgium
wouter.vandooren@soc.kuleuven.be

Catégories

Lieux

  • Milan, Italie

Dates

  • lundi 01 mai 2006

Contacts

  • Steven Van de Walle
    courriel : steven [dot] vandewalle [at] soc [dot] kuleuven [dot] ac [dot] be

Source de l'information

  • Steven Van de Walle
    courriel : steven [dot] vandewalle [at] soc [dot] kuleuven [dot] ac [dot] be

Pour citer cette annonce

« Utilisation and non-utilisation of public sector performance information. In search of real evidence », Appel à contribution, Calenda, Publié le mardi 21 février 2006, http://calenda.org/191196