AccueilMulticulturalism, modernity and citizenship in Canada

Multiculturalism, modernity and citizenship in Canada

Interdisciplinary Conference in Canadian Studies

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Publié le mardi 24 juillet 2007 par Delphine Cavallo

Résumé

From the 1990s on, the Canadian multicultural discourse has increasingly focused on the concept of citizenship, which has in turn meant insisting more on the notion of unity and less on that of diversity. Should this be interpreted as a step backward from multiculturalism taken as an ideology and as a policy? From a European perspective, what lessons can be learnt at a time when a growing number of countries are adopting a multicultural terminology and the European Union needs to negotiate a balance between unity and diversity? Should the emergence of a modern form of citizenship be interpreted as the advent of hybrid identities or as a step towards a certain social and cultural anomy? What are then the prospects for multiple identities within a plural nation?

Annonce

Interdisciplinary Conference in Canadian Studies

Multiculturalism, modernity and citizenship in Canada

Strasbourg, November 9th and 10th 2007
Marc Bloch University

The Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism established in 1963 was primarily concerned with the relations between the French and the English, defined as the “founding races” of Canada, while paying some attention to the “other ethnic groups”.  However, this attempt at redefining the national community and a sense of togetherness within the Canadian Confederation ignored the Aboriginal peoples. In 1971, the shift of emphasis in the political discourse from the notion of bi- to that of multi-culturalism was meant to be more representative of the cultural and ethnic diversity of Canadian society. However, this new brand of multiculturalism was soon criticized for being, on the one hand, essentialist in terms of identities, and on the other hand, for overlooking the socio-economic as well as political issues at stake. From the 1990s on, the Canadian multicultural discourse has increasingly focused on the concept of citizenship, which has in turn meant insisting more on the notion of unity and less on that of diversity. Should this be interpreted as a step backward from multiculturalism taken as an ideology and as a policy? From a European perspective, what lessons can be learnt at a time when a growing number of countries are adopting a multicultural terminology and the European Union needs to negotiate a balance between unity and diversity? Should the emergence of a modern form of citizenship be interpreted as the advent of hybrid identities or as a step towards a certain social and cultural anomy? What are then the prospects for multiple identities within a plural nation?

In order to answer these questions, the papers presented should seek to explore and perhaps transcend the following dichotomies between individual and collective rights, integration and assimilation, the public and private spheres, nation in the singular and in the plural, as well as unity and pluralism. Through an interdisciplinary and transversal approach, combining ethnology, sociolinguistics, political science and educational studies we will try to analyze how multicultural citizenship translates in practice in the fields of political and institutional organization, of intellectual property as well as in terms of cultural, linguistic and educational rights. Comparative perspectives with European situations are welcome in so far as they shed light on the debate pertaining to the specificities of Canadian multiculturalism.

The conference is co-organized by the Centre for Canadian Studies, the GEPE (Research on European Plurilingualism) and the CRIA (Interdisciplinary Research in Anthropology) from Marc Bloch University.

Preliminary Conference Program:

Friday November 9th
Multiculturalism : theoretical and ideological perspectives

Chair person : Françoise Le Jeune (Université de Nantes)

9h00-9h30 Introductory speech

9h30-10h30 Guest speaker : Danielle Juteau (Université de Montréal).

10h30-11h15 Hélène Bertheleu (Université François-Rabelais, Tours) « Multiculturalisme, citoyenneté et conflit : une approche sociologique »

11h15-11h30 Coffee Break

11h30-12h15 Janie Pélabay (Université Libre de Bruxelles) « La “deep diversity” selon Charles Taylor : quelle pertinence pour l’Union européenne ? »

12h15-13h00 Ariane Cyr (La Sorbonne Nouvelle) « Le sentiment citoyen minoritaire au Québec : état des lieux »

Lunch

Multiculturalism : citizenship and identities

Chair person: Laurent Batut (Université Marc Bloch, Strasbourg)

14h30-15h15 Patrick Farges (Université François-Rabelais, Tours) « Une identité à trait d’union ? Les « German-Canadians » et la nation-mosaïque multiculturelle. »

15h15-16h00 Yves Laberge (Université Laval). « Citoyenneté, appartenances et identité nationale: célébrations de la fête nationale au Québec et au Canada »

16h00-16h45 Judy Maxwell (Australian National University) “A Cause Worth Fighting For. How Chinese Canadians from the Second World War Fought for Social & Political Rights for Minorities”

16h45-17h00 Coffee break

17h00-17h45 Khalida Tanvir Syed (University of Alberta) “Exploring Teacher Educators’ Experiences of Teaching Canadian Multiculturalism”

17h45-18h30 Jorge Ginieniewicz (University of Toronto) “Citizenship learning and political participation of immigrants: The case of Latin Americans in Toronto and Montreal.”

Saturday November 10th
Linguistic issues

Chair person : Claude Truchot (Université Marc Bloch, Strasbourg)

9h00-9h45 Guest speaker : Jürgen Erfurt  (Université de Francfort-s-le-Main). « Multiculturalisme canadien vs. Interculturalisme québécois: les défis pour l’immigration de la nouvelle francophonie au Québec »

9h45-10h30 Sébastien Socqué (Université de Paris-IV Sorbonne). « A propos de quelques instabilités dans la pensée de André Laurendeau. Laurendeau était bi- ou multi-culturaliste ? »

10h30-11h15 Marcienne Martin (Université de Montpellier) “Entre pratiques mémorielles et identité, le multiculturalisme analysé à l’aune de la mémoire collective : l’exemple de la province du Québec » 

11h15-11h30 Coffee Break

11h30-12h15. Gwendolyne Cressman (Université Marc Bloch, Strasbourg) « Perspectives comparées sur les politiques linguistiques canadiennes et européennes »

12h15-13h00 Ann-Birte Krüger (IUFM d’Alsace) "Les représentations des langues dans un espace transfrontalier. Une analyse d'enquêtes menées avec des élèves d'origine turque nés en Alsace ou dans le Bade-Wurtemberg."

Lunch

First Nations within the « Canadian mosaic »

Chair person : Nina Reuther (Université Marc Bloch, Strasbourg)-

14h30-15h15 Guest speaker: John Jules,  Directeur de la gestion des ressources naturelles, Kamloops B.C., Shuswap Nation, Canada. "Pan-Indianism in Multi-Cultural Mosaic"

15h15-16h00 Romeo Saganash, Gran Council of the Cree/Director of Quebec Relations and International. Titre à déterminer

16h00-16h45 Eric Navet (CRIA Strasbourg). Titre à déterminer

16h45-17h00 Coffee Break

17h00-17h45 Florence Cartigny (Université de Bordeaux 3). “The NDP government of Lorne Calvert in Saskatchewan Aboriginal affairs (2001-2007)”

17h45-18h30 Isabelle Schulte-Tenckhoff (Université de Genève) "What - if anything - does multiculturalism do for Aboriginal peoples in Canada?"

 Dinner

Lieux

  • Université Marc Bloch, 22 rue René Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg
    Strasbourg, France

Dates

  • vendredi 09 novembre 2007
  • samedi 10 novembre 2007

Mots-clés

  • Canada, identité, politiques linguistiques, multiculturalisme

Contacts

  • Gwen Cressman
    courriel : GWENCRESSMAN [at] FREE [dot] FR
  • Nina Reuther
    courriel : nreuther [at] umb [dot] u-strasbg [dot] fr

Source de l'information

  • Nina Reuther
    courriel : nreuther [at] umb [dot] u-strasbg [dot] fr

Pour citer cette annonce

« Multiculturalism, modernity and citizenship in Canada », Colloque, Calenda, Publié le mardi 24 juillet 2007, http://calenda.org/193389