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Les réformes du secteur de la sécurité et de la défense en Asie centrale

Security and Defense Reform in Central Asia

The Journal of Power Institutions in Post-Soviet Societies

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Publié le mercredi 07 avril 2010 par Marie Pellen

Résumé

Two decades after the Soviet regime's collapse, the military and security institutions of Central Asia play an ever more important role in supporting national regimes and addressing national and regional challenges. After independence, the leaders of Central Asian countries increased their reliance on the military to address the challenges of independence and promote security. This inevitably influenced civil-military and intra-military relations, and society’s perception of the military. This issue will focus on the changes that have taken place in Central Asian military institutions since the fall of the Soviet Union, as well as the lingering continuities of the Soviet legacy. How do changes in Central Asian militaries compare to those of other former Soviet states? How do international actors influence change and continuity of Central Asian power institutions? Are there any signs of a revival of pre-Soviet traditions in Central Asian militaries?

Annonce

The Journal of Power Institutions in Post-Soviet Societies

Issue 12, December 2010

Erica Marat & Elisabeth Sieca-Kozlowski (12th Issue Editors)

Two decades after the Soviet regime's collapse, the military and security institutions of Central Asia play an ever more important role in supporting national regimes and addressing national and regional challenges. After independence, the leaders of Central Asian countries increased their reliance on the military to address the challenges of independence and promote security. This inevitably influenced civil-military and intra-military relations, and society’s perception of the military.

Organizations like the Russian-led Collective Security Treaty Organization and the Shanghai Cooperation Organization furthered this trend by encouraging greater military collaboration with Central Asia. Joint exercises between the militaries of Russia, China, and Central Asian states are conducted annually and often become the major military drills conducted in the region. Western organizations such as NATO and the European Organization for Security and Cooperation also worked to help Central Asian military and paramilitary institutions implement democratic reform and greater involvement in the international community.

This issue will focus on the changes that have taken place in Central Asian military institutions since the fall of the Soviet Union, as well as the lingering continuities of the Soviet legacy. How do changes in Central Asian militaries compare to those of other former Soviet states? How do international actors influence change and continuity of Central Asian power institutions? Are there any signs of a revival of pre-Soviet traditions in Central Asian militaries?

The following aspects are of particular interest:

• How did the breakup of the Soviet regime influence power institutions (ministries, Security Council, paramilitary), the military and political leaders across the region and in each country? How did the military’s role in the state and society change? How did relationships within the military change?

• How did Central Asian states proceed with defense reform? Which aspects of the military structure and command underwent transformations? How did the functions of specific institutions (e.g. border control service, police, anti-terrorism structures, recruitment, etc.) change? What has remained the same in the military structure and command since the Soviet period?

• How did independence shape civil-military relations and decision-making processes? What role have military leaders played in the political domain? Who is in charge of defining security threats and developing security and military strategy?

• Did the rates of individual soldier hazing increase or decrease? Did power relations within the military change? How does political leadership treat cases of hazing?

• How does society perceive the military in Central Asia? How popular is the army? Do Central Asian people view the military as a national defense mechanism? Are there any NGOs seeking to influence military institutions?

• What values and overall culture are promulgated in the military? Is the military serving the nation-state or ethnic-state?

• What are the views of veterans toward past and current conflicts? Do veterans impact the current policy and public life? How are veteran communities organized?

• How do international and regional security organizations such as SCO, CSTO, NATO and OSCE involved in the region impact national militaries?

Guidelines for article submission

The journal will be published in three languages (French, English and Russian with a 100-word abstract in English) thanks to which most authors will be able to write in their mother tongue. This will ensure greater precision in the articles and avoid a decrease in scientific quality. But we draw your attention to the fact that most pipss.org readers are essentially English speakers, therefore we do encourage articles in English in order to reach an audience as broad as possible.

The articles submitted to pipss.org for publication should be original contributions and should not be under consideration for any other publication at the same time. Manuscripts should be attached as Microsoft Word format. References should be given in footnotes. (For more details about the guidelines for article submission please check http://www.pipss.org or contact the Editorial Board). There should be a cover page stating the author's background and affiliation, full address.

If you wish to submit an article, please first contact the editorial board and send a 100-word abstract in English. The deadline for article submission is September 15th, 2010, with publication in December 2010. Final decisions on publication will be made by the Editorial Board.

Please send your contributions or inquiries to:

Elisabeth Sieca-Kozlowski, Chief Editor, contact@pipss.org

Erica Marat & Elisabeth Sieca-Kozlowski (12th Issue Editors)

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Papers dealing with other issues related to armies and power institutions in the CIS, as well as book review proposals are also welcome.

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BOOK REVIEWS

Publishers interested in publicizing their editions, please send review copies to:

Elisabeth Sieca-Kozlowski , CERSIPS

c/° CERCEC, # 824, 54 bd Raspail, 75006 Paris, France

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Elisabeth Sieca-Kozlowski

Chief Editor

The Journal of Power Institutions in Post-Soviet Societies

http://www.pipss.org

contact@pipss.org

Editorial Board :

Eden Cole, Anna Colin Lebedev, Francoise Dauce, Gilles Favarel-Garrigues,  Anne Le Huerou, Erica Marat, Amandine Regamey, Laurent Rucker, Elisabeth Sieca-Kozlowski, Joris Van Bladel

Scientific Board :

Adrian Beck (UK), Alexander Belkin (Russia), Frederic Charillon (France), Stephen Cimbala (USA), Julian Cooper (UK), Roger Mc Dermott (UK), Isabelle Facon (France), Mark Galeotti (UK), Aleksandr Gol'ts (Russia), Dale Herspring (USA), Philippe Manigart (Belgium), Kimberly Zisk Marten (USA), Michael Orr  (UK), Michael Parrish (USA), Nikolay Petrov (Russia), Eduard Ponarin (Russia), Jean-Christophe Romer (France), Jacques Sapir (France), Manfred Sapper (Germany), Louise Shelley (USA), Richard Staar (USA), Brian Taylor (USA), Mikhail Tsypkin (USA), Stephen Webber (UK), Elena Zdravomyslova (Russia)

 

 

Dates

  • jeudi 15 juillet 2010

Mots-clés

  • Asie Centrale, Forces Armées, Ministères de force, réformes

Contacts

  • Elisabeth Sieca-Kozlowski
    courriel : elisabeth [dot] kozlowski [at] ehess [dot] fr

Source de l'information

  • Elisabeth Sieca-Kozlowski
    courriel : elisabeth [dot] kozlowski [at] ehess [dot] fr

Pour citer cette annonce

« Les réformes du secteur de la sécurité et de la défense en Asie centrale », Appel à contribution, Calenda, Publié le mercredi 07 avril 2010, http://calenda.org/200783