AccueilCommunautés religieuses et étatisation

Communautés religieuses et étatisation

Religious Community and Modern Statehood

Le passage de l'Empire ottoman aux États modernes

The passage from the Ottoman empire to modern states

*  *  *

Publié le mercredi 08 septembre 2010 par Karim Hammou

Résumé

The conference aims to explore various aspects of the communal organization in the Ottoman Empire for regions such as Asia Minor, Middle East and the Balkans, and to present the changes that occurred within the religious communities during the 19th century and particularly during the period from Tanzimat reforms until the First World War. Key questions in relation to the modernization process of the Ottoman state and the functioning of religious communities, are a) how does the Sublime Porte understand the process of structuring a modern state with respect to religious communities, b) who is responsible for the modern institutions: the state or the religious communities, c) what is the reaction of the religious communities regarding the modernization process d) why and in what way the religious communities are changing on the light of this process.

Annonce

We would like to invite you to attend the International Conference Religious community and modern statehood: « The passage from the Ottoman Empire to modern states », organized by the Department of Turkish and Middle Eastern Studies of the University of Cyprus and the École française d'Athènes. The Conference will be held in Nicosia during the 29th and the 30th of October 2010.
One of the main features of the modern state has been the intention of the state to penetrate to society and to control in a large extent the daily life of its citizens. In order to control the society, the modern state tried to exploit it’s citizens in different levels through various institutions, such as public education, obligatory recruitment and bureaucratic organization. Based on religious communities, the Ottoman Empire tried to control the populations in the Ottoman lands, imposing thus its own imperial perception for the state and its people. The existence of the religious communities and the functioning of the Ottoman state on the basis of these communities, made the passage from the Ottoman imperial structure to the modern states, a complicated procedure.

The conference aims to explore various aspects of the communal organization in the Ottoman Empire for regions such as Asia Minor, Middle East and the Balkans, and to present the changes that occurred within the religious communities during the 19th century and particularly during the period from Tanzimat reforms until the First World War. Key questions in relation to the modernization process of the Ottoman state and the functioning of religious communities, are a) how does the Sublime Porte understand the process of structuring a modern state with respect to religious communities, b) who is responsible for the modern institutions: the state or the religious communities, c) what is the reaction of the religious communities regarding the modernization process d) why and in what way the religious communities are changing on the light of this process.

PROGRAMME

October 29, Friday

16:30 - 16:45 Welcoming

16:45 - 17:00 STROHMEIER Martin, Chairman of the Department of Turkish and Middle Eastern Studies, Welcome Speech

  • 17:00 - 17:30 DERINGIL Selim, Bogaziçi University, Istanbul - Keynote Speech
    Re-configuring Ottoman citizenship in the Tanzimat state: conversion, religion and identity politics in the late Ottoman Empire

17:30 - 18:00 Coffee Break

Session I - Christians and Muslims in the late Ottoman Empire

Chairperson: VARNAVAS Andrekos

  • 18:00 - 18:20 KECHRIOTIS Vangelis, Bo¤aziçi University, ‹stanbul. Bayonets and Bullets in the name of the Constitution: Post-colonial criticism and Muslim-Christian relations in the late Ottoman Empire
  • 18:20 - 18:40 ANASTASSIADOU Meropi, Centre National de la Recherché Scientifique, Paris. Non-Muslim communities and state control in the late Ottoman Empire. Administrative practice and decisionmaking within the Greek orthodox parishes of Istanbul
  • 18:40 - 19:00 MICHAEL Michalis, University of Cyprus, Nicosia. The Orthodox community of Cyprus between the Ottoman and the British colonial perceptions of modernity
  • 19:00 - 19:20 ANAGNOSTOPOULOU Sia, Panteion University, Athens. The millet system as a tool of a “differentiated modernity”, 19th c.-beginning of the 20th c.

19:20 - 20:00 Discussion

20:15 - 22:00 Dinner

October 30, Saturday

Session II - The Ottoman religious community and Nationalism

Chairperson: KECHRIOTIS Vangelis

  • 9:00 - 9:20 VARNAVAS Andrekos, Flinders University, Adelaide. Cypriots transforming from a class, religious and regional identity, to an ethnic national identity
  • 9:20 - 9:40 KONORTAS Paraskevas, National and Capodistrian University of Athens, Athens. Greek nationalism vs Greek orthodox milli establishment in Ottoman Thrace in educational matters during the first decade of the 20th century
  • 9:40 - 10:00 KIZILYÜREK Niyazi, University of Cyprus, Nicosia. The Turkish Cypriots, modernity and religion

10:00 - 10:30 Discussion

10:30 - 11:00 Coffee Break

Session III-  Religious community, education and statehood

Chairperson: KONORTAS Paraskevas

  • 11:00 - 11:20 FORTNA Benjamin, School of Oriental and African Studies, London
    Education between Empire and nation: spaces, lives and commodities
  • 11:20 - 11:40 VERDEIL Chantal, Institut national des langues et civilisations orientales, Paris. Education in the Arab provinces of the Ottoman Empire before the Crimean war
  • 11:40 - 12:00 STAVRIDES Theoharis, University of Cyprus, Nicosia. The Organization and development of Greek orthodox education in Cyprus in the 19th century
  • 12:00 - 12:20 LYBERATOS Andreas, Institute for Mediterranean Studies - FORTH, University of Crete School, community, state: remarks on the development of public education in late Ottoman and post-Ottoman Bulgaria (19th c. – 1912)

12:20 - 13:00 Discussion

13:15 - 14:30 Lunch

Session IV - Religious communities and colonialism

Chairperson: FORTNA Benjamin

  • 17:30 - 17:50 HADJIIOSSIF Christos, Institute for Mediterranean Studies, University of Crete, Rethymnon Colonial policies and Ottoman reforms
  • 17:50 - 18:10 COHEN-MULLER Rina, Institut national des langues et civilisations orientales, Paris Christians and Jews – the French game in Ottoman Jerusalem during the 19th Century
  • 18:10 - 18:30 BOCQUET Jérôme, Université d’Orléans, Orléans Missionary presence, diplomatic rivalries and proselytizing among the Ottoman Empire’s religious communities: The case of 19th c. Ottoman Syria
  • 18:30 - 18:50 ANASTASSIADES Tassos, École française d’Athènes/Sciences-Po, Paris. The ambiguities of a confessional age: lessons from Eastern Mediterranean

18:50 - 19:30 Discussion

19:30 - 20:00 Conclusions

20:15 - 22:00 Dinner

Lieux

  • Nicosie (Chypre), The Classic Hotel, Van Gogh Conference room, 94 Rigenis street

Dates

  • vendredi 29 octobre 2010
  • samedi 30 octobre 2010

Mots-clés

  • religions, état, nationalisme, modernité, éducation, empire ottoman, Méditerranée

Contacts

  • Michalis Michael
    courriel : michaelm [at] ucy [dot] ac [dot] cy

URLS de référence

Source de l'information

  • Anastassios Anastassiadis
    courriel : anastassios [dot] anastassiadis [at] efa [dot] gr

Pour citer cette annonce

« Communautés religieuses et étatisation », Colloque, Calenda, Publié le mercredi 08 septembre 2010, http://calenda.org/201751