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Philology in the Digital Age

Philology in the Digital Age

2011 Annual Conference and Members' Meeting of the TEI Consortium

2011 Annual Conference and Members' Meeting of the TEI Consortium

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Publié le mardi 30 août 2011 par Karim Hammou

Résumé

The University of Würzburg with its Centre for Digital Editing in cooperation with the German Literature Archive Marbach and the international Programme Committe welcome you to the 2011 International Conference and Members' Meeting of the Text Encoding Initiative. The program features keynote lectures by Edward Vanhoutte and Andrea Rapp, parallel sessions of papers and round table discussions, the annual TEI business meeting, a poster session/tools demonstration and slam, and special interest group (SIG) meetings.

Annonce

International Programme Committee

  • Arianna Ciula, European Science Foundation
  • Roland Kamzelak, Deutsches Literaturarchiv Marbach
  • Martin Mueller, TEI board chair, Northwestern University
  • Laurent Romary (chair), TEI council chair,
    INRIA & Humboldt University
  • Susan Schreibman, Trinity College Dublin
  • Michael Sperberg-McQueen, Black Mesa Technologies
  • Joachim Veit, Musikwissenschaftliches Seminar
    Detmold/Paderborn
  • Rebecca Welzenbach, University of Michigan Library
  • Andreas Witt, Institut für Deutsche Sprache
  • Christian Wittern, Kyoto University

Program

Tuesday, 11 October 2011

  • Workshop "Analysing Electronic Dictionaries with TEI"
  • Tutorial "Using the Scalable Architecture for Digital Editions (SADE) for the digital presentation of TEI encoded texts"
  • Tutorial "Tuning oXygen XML Editor for TEI"
  • Tutorial "Preparing a Critical Edition of an Incunabula with TEI"

Wednesday, 12 October 2011

Thursday, 13 October 2011

Friday, 14 October 2011

Saturday, 15 October 2011

Sunday, 16 October 2011

  • TEI-C Board meeting

Keynote Speakers

Edward Vanhoutte (Gent): "So You Think You Can Edit? The Masterchef Edition"

Wednesday, 12 October 2011, 18:00h, Toskana-Saal

Culinary history shows that every wave of gastronomic innovation is directly followed by a reflective appreciation of traditional cooking techniques, terroir cuisine, and local produce. Moreover, the subtle balancing of the four basic tastes – sweet, sour, bitter and salty – and the more recently discovered fifth taste umami, together with a perfect control over texture and temperature in innovative food creations refer more to traditional cooking than newcomers in the food trade generally acknowledge. Surely, technological research and development affects the clientele's food experience because it alters the way chefs cook and dress up their dishes but it hardly replaces the achievements and insights of traditional cooking. An inclusive approach towards tradition and innovation is therefore key.

Likewise, our thinking about the digital scholarly edition should take an inclusive approach towards the accomplishments of the past. The current models for the social edition tend to underestimate the essential function of the scholarly edition in the transmission of (literary) works to next generations and focus mainly on collaboration, engagement, and participation. Claims about the 'anonymous' apparatus variorum, the failure of 'self-contained' editions and the role of the editor as 'progenitor of knowledge creation', for instance, signal some misunderstandings of traditional bibliography from the perspective of the social web. It seems that the attack on the authorial intention by sociological theories – the work as a social product – and processional theories – the work as a process rather than a product – in the 1980s and 1990s now migrates to an attack on the editorial role by the advocates of the social edition who see the scholarly text as a uniquely collaborative process defined by the available social technologies.

Therefore I wish to reiterate the importance of the 'four traditional basic tastes' of a scholarly edition – the constituted reading text, the apparatus variorum, the genetic and transmissional history, and the commentary – and add social technologies as savoriness or umami to the editorial dish. Surely, technological research and development affects the user's experience with a digital edition and it alters the ways and the conditions in which editors edit and construct their editions, but it hardly replaces the achievements and insights of traditional bibliography. An inclusive approach towards tradition and innovation is therefore key.

Biography:

Edward Vanhoutte is currently Director of Research and Publications in the Royal Academy of Dutch Language and Literature - KANTL (Gent, Belgium; and head of the Centre voor Scholarly Editing and Document Studies - CTB. He is also a Research Associate of UCL Centre for Digital Humanities (University College London). Edward is Editor-in-Chief of LLC. The Journal of Digital Scholarship in the Humanities, Managing Editor of Verslagen en Mededelingen van de Koninklijke Academie voor Nederlandse Taal- en Letterkunde, and member of the editorial boards of Digital Studies / Le champ numérique, (SDH/SEMI) and TEI Extramural Journal-EJ. He publishes widely on (electronic) textual and genetic criticism, electronic scholarly editing, and humanities computing and he is co-author of TEI by Example. Edward serves as a member of several boards and councils such as the Huygens Institute - ING, the executive council of the ALLC, and the technical committee of the dbnl: Digitale Bibliotheek der Nederlandse Letteren. His research interests include text-encoding and markup of modern manuscript material, electronic scholarly editing, genetic editing, and the history of electronic editing and humanities computing. Occasional blogs on Humanities Computing can be found on The Mind Tool: Edward Vanhoutte's Blog.

    email: edward.vanhoutte@kantl.be | Twitter: @evanhoutte

Andrea Rapp (Darmstadt): "From text technology to cultural technology: the role of the TEI in Virtual Research Environments"

Saturday, 15 October 2011, 17:00h, Hubland-Campus ZHSG 0.001

Virtual research environments which are supporting and at the same time altering the research process in the humanities are currenty booming: they enable access to digital resources, tools and research findings in an unprecedented way. Standards, metadata and annotations are playing an eminently important role in this, and not only with regard to interoperability and sustainability of resources. For analogue representations of textual expression, cultural practices have been in the making / undergoing constant development for centuries. These practices affect the ways in which information and knowledge are stored, transmitted, explored, discovered etc. In the course of the development negotiations over (metadata-)standards, especially the TEI Guidelines, philologists have provided insights into the structure of texts, the organization of knowledge, the establishment of networks and the explicitation of this type of information. The development of bespoke cultural technologies can thus benefit from this knowlegde in order to address and establish new research questions and methods. In this paper, I am going to address and pursue these issues and challenges on the basis of concrete examples such as FuD, TextGrid, Dariah, Clarin). In particular, I will address the questions such as which cultural technologies are currently promising fruitful approaches to research questions of the humanities in the 21st century, how these can benefit from the experience of textual scholarship in the previous centuries and how current virtual research environments are likely to alter the face of textual scholarship in the future.

Biography: 

Since 2010 Andrea Rapp is a professor for medieval studies and computer philology at the Department of Linguistics and Literary Studies at Technical University Darmstadt. She has been the head of the Goettingen Digitization Center at the State and University Library in Goettingen (2003-2004), afterwards one of the executive directors of the Center for Digital Humanities at Trier University (2004-2010). She has been working in the field of digitization, digital editions, electronic dictionaries, and digital humanities in general for over 20 years. She is in charge of several DFG- and BMBF-funded projects and is one of the initiators of the TextGrid project.

website: http://www.linglit.tu-darmstadt.de/index.php?id=rapp0

Papers

Session "Opinions"

Thursday, 13 October 2011, 9:00h, Hubland-Campus, ZHSG 0.001

Session "Digital Editions (1)"

Thursday, 13 October 2011, 11:00h, Hubland-Campus, ZHSG 0.001

Session "Tech Corner"

Thursday, 13 October 2011, 11:00h, Hubland-Campus, ZHSG 0.002

Session "Digital Editions (2)"

Thursday, 13 October 2011, 16:00h, Hubland-Campus, ZHSG 0.001

Session "Representations and Workflow (1)"

Thursday, 13 October 2011, 16:00h, Hubland-Campus, ZHSG 0.002

Session "Representations and Workflow (2)"

Friday, 14 October 2011, 14:00h, Hubland-Campus, ZHSG 0.002

Panel "Representing genres of computer-mediated communication in TEI"

Friday, 14 October 2011, 14:00h, Hubland-Campus, ZHSG 0.001

Session "Encoding"

Saturday, 15 October 2011, 14:00h, Hubland-Campus, ZHSG 0.001

Session "Tools (1)"

Saturday, 15 October 2011, 14:00h, Hubland-Campus, ZHSG 0.002

Session "Tools (2)"

Saturday, 15 October 2011, 16:00h, Hubland-Campus, ZHSG 0.002

Micropapers

Saturday, 15 October 2011, 16:00h, Hubland-Campus, ZHSG 0.001

Posters and Demos

Poster slam: Friday, 14 October 2011, 16:00h, Hubland-Campus, ZHSG 0.001

Poster session: Friday, 14 October 2011, 17:00h, Hubland-Campus

Pre-Conference Tutorials

As in previous years, the meeting will be accomponied by pre-conference tutorials on various TEI related topics. This will give delegates the opportunity to learn from experienced practitioners in the field. Please make sure to register for participation in tutorials as early as possible as places are limited. Tutorials can also be booked independently from conference attendance.

The following tutorials are open for registration:

  • Using the Scalable Architecture for Digital Editions (SADE) for the digital presentation of TEI encoded texts
  • Tuning oXygen XML Editor for TEI
  • Using TILE to build links between text and images in TEI projects
  • TextGrid
  • Preparing a Critical Edition of an Incunabla with TEI

See below for details. In addition, several workshops will be offered.

Using the Scalable Architecture for Digital Editions (SADE) for the digital presentation of TEI encoded texts

Tuesday, 11 October 2001, 10-17h, Hubland-Campus, ZHSG 1.003

Instructor: Alexander Czmiel, Berlin Academy of Sciences

Registration fee: US$ 100

The Telota working group of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities wants to offer a tutorial on the Scalable Architecture for Digital Editions (SADE). The tutorial aims to introduce SADE as publication framework for any kind of text based digital resources. It will show the participants the various deployment methods and explain how the different components (XML database, image viewer, front-end etc.) of SADE work together. In the hands-on-section of the tutorial the participants will learn how to deploy SADE themselves and how to adjust the provided XQuery, XSLT and CSS-scripts for their own needs. As SADE comes with native support for TEI encoded texts it serves as an appropriate tool to query, transform and publish these texts. The included image viewer digilib in turn is a proper tool for text-image-linked presentations.

The target audience are (digital) humanists with good knowledge of XML/TEI and HTML and at least basic knowledge of XSLT, XQuery and XPath, who plan to produce an own digital edition based on the TEI guidelines.

References:

Tuning oXygen XML Editor for TEI

Tuesday, 11 October 2011, 10-14h, Hubland-Campus, ZHSG 1.006

Instructor: George Bina, Syncro Soft / oXygen XML Editor

Registration fee: US$ 50

This tutorial will provide an overview presentation of the oXygen features going into details on the TEI specific support and on the parts that are generally used in relation with TEI work. oXygen comes with built-in support for TEI but this support is not hard coded, it is just a default configuration that can be extended/modified/customized according to your needs. I will explain what the default TEI support consists of and how this can be customized and shared within a group of users. We will discuss also validation technologies like Schematron or NVDL, working with XML databases, processing/querying documents, etc. I am open also to any topic from the audience and part of the tutorial will be an open discussion on any TEI - XML - oXygen related topic.

Using TILE to build links between text and images in TEI projects

Wednesday, 12 October 2011, 10-17h, Hubland-Campus, ZHSG 1.006

Instructor: Dot Porter

Registration fee: US$ 100

Aimed at student and faculty scholars with intermediate to advanced experience using TEI or XML, this course will provide an introduction to using TILE, the Text-Image Linking Environment, to build various types of links for TEI projects (http://tileproject.org/). Working with the Image markup plug-in and the Semi-automated line recognizer in the online installation of TILE, during the morning we will look at a variety of different TEI files that represent links between text and image, for example manuscripts and transcriptions of the texts contained in them, paintings and poems written to describe them, and illustrations and annotations describing them. During the afternoon students will work with their own TEI files in TILE. The instructor will provide materials for students who do not bring their own.

An introduction to working with the TextGridLab

Wednesday, 12 October 2011, 10-17h, Hubland-Campus, ZHSG 1.003

Instructors: Oliver Schmid, Celia Krause and Philipp Vanscheidt (Darmstadt University of Technology)

Maximum number of participants: 20

Registration fee: US$ 100

The joint project TextGrid aims to support access to and exchange of data in the arts and humanities by means of modern information technology. TextGrid serves as a virtual research environment for philologists, linguists, musicologists and art historians. As a single point of entry to the virtual research environment, TextGridLab(oratory) provides integrated access to specialized tools, services and content. TextGridRep(ository) is a long-term archive for research data in the humanities embedded in a grid infrastructure, which will ensure availability and access to its research data as well as interoperability.

The workshop will introduce the basics of working with the TextGridLab. A brief theoretic introduction will lay the groundwork for the interactive main section of the course. First of all, the basic knowledge of the project and the infrastructure of TextGrid will be imparted, then the general tools are presented and tested by the participants during the interactive section. Subsequently, the expert tools are brought into focus, prioritizing the work with TEI encoded texts and image files using the Text Image Link Editor. Furthermore, the functional range of the XML Editor and the Metadata Editor is presented as well as further expert tools.

References:

Preparing a Critical Edition of an Incunabula with TEI

Tuesday, 11 October 2011, 13-17h, Hubland-Campus ZHSG 1.004

Instructor: Guenther Goerz, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremburg, Josef Schneeberger, Hochschule Deggendorf, Klaus Thoden, MPI für Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Berlin

Registration fee: $50

Digital editions of incunabula --- books printed before 1500 --- provide a number of challenges.  Many practices from the manuscript culture survived in typesetting for some time, e.g. the use of a large number of special glyphs for ligatures and abbreviations. Word breaks at the end of lines are often unsystematic and in many cases there is no hyphenation sign at all.  In many cases, spacing between words is rather narrow and sometimes also missing.  Furthermore, punctuation marks are missing or put in places where one would not expect them, such that sentence borders cannot always be recognized clearly.  Of course, there is no normalized spelling such that many variants of words occur, sometimes even with erroneous spelling. 

In this workshop, we will take up a practical example to discuss the decisions to be made to solve the aforementioned problems in the framework of TEI.  Our example is the “Deutsche Ptolemaeus”, a geographical work written in early modern German and printed around 1490, of which only two copies are extant.  TEI offers facilities for semantic annotations, e.g. for person and place names (named entities), and technical terms.  Furthermore, it provides means for linking with lexical resources, glossaries, and comments.  Most tools of computational linguistics are only to a certain extent suitable to deal with the particular linguistic variety which is a dialect variant of early modern southern German.  Hence, some specific heuristics have to be developed to at least partially automate the tagging process. Furthermore, we will present specific scripts in XSLT to produce different versions of the transcription, XHTML, raw text, and printed editions.

This tutorial is taught in German language.

Pre-Conference Workshops

As in previous years, the meeting will be accomponied by pre-conference workshops on various TEI related topics. Please make sure to register for participation in workshops as early as possible as places are limited.

The following workshops are open for registration:

  • Analysing Electronic Dictionaries with TEI
  • Tightening the Representation of Lexical Data, a TEI Perspective
  • Combining Music Notation and Text - Encoding and Rendering MEI in TEI.

See below for details. In addition, several Tutorials will be offered.

Analysing Electronic Dictionaries with TEI

Tuesday, 11 October 2011, 10-17h, Hubland-Campus, ZHSG 1.005

Workshop facilitator: Dietmar Seipel, Univ. Würzburg

Registration fee: US$ 50

The workshop deals with developing tools for analysing morphological processes in word formation that might be applicable for corpus research of complex words. Topics:

  • tools for morphological analyses
  • lexicographical structures
  • word morphology
  • language change
  • variance between and within dictionaries
  • modelling morpheme structures
  • construction and analysis of meta-dictionaries in TEI
  • parsing techniques for information extraction
  • analysis of morpheme networks
  • declarative languages for analysis

Tightening the representation of lexical data, a TEI perspective

Wednesday, 12 October 2011, 10-17h, Hubland-Campus, ZHSG 1.005

Workshop facilitator: Laurent Romary

Registration fee: US$ 50

The “Print Dictionary” chapter of the TEI guidelines was initially conceived to represent human readable dictionaries, in particular in the case of the digitization of existing paper dictionaries. Its neat hierarchy of lexicographic concepts has also made it a very practical framework for representing machine-readable lexAleical data, even in very specific NLP applications. Still, as is often the case with the TEI guidelines in general, there are often many different ways to represent the same phenomenon, which is a potential hindrance for ensuring full interoperability between TEI based lexical applications. Finally, the recent publication of ISO standard 24613 (LMF – Lexical Markup Framework) has shown the necessity to identify a TEI based serialisation that would optimally map the concepts of the LMF meta-model.

The workshop will bring together representatives from various lexical database (both human- and machine-readable ones) initiatives to compare their practices in implementing the TEI guidelines. The format will be based on short presentations focusing on specific lexical phenomena and suggesting precise guidelines for their representations. The expected output of the workshop is a set of application guidelines to be used for machine readable dictionaries.

Contributions are expected in the wide variety of potential lexical structures. The following lists should just be seen as mere suggestions for possible topics:

  • Representation of morphological information
  • Additional grammatical features
  • Constraints and dependencies between features
  • Implementation of LMF components
  • Standardisation of data categories (link to ISOCat)
  • Tightening sense representation
  • Multilingual lexical, link structures
  • Derivations and related entries

Combining Music Notation and Text – Encoding and Rendering MEI in TEI

Wednesday, 12 October 2011, 10-17h, Hubland-Campus, ZHSG 1.004

Facilitator: Johannes Kepper, Detmold

Registration fee: US$ 50

A large number of TEI projects  deal with texts containing music notation. These inclusions range from short melody or rhythm snippets to several pages of music. During the last year, the SIG Music has worked on the integration of TEI and MEI, requested a new element in the TEI and produced some guidelines.  The proposed workshop has two goals.

First, the current model will be discussed and evaluated against different kinds of source documents. It is intended to have an open discussion with participants currently not involved in the working group and work on their documents as well. The group has already had the opportunity to collect examples and opinions from several scholars; however, this workshop will incourage new contributions and will introduce the proposed model to the public.

The second part of the workshop will focus on rendering MEI. Currently, there is only a tool for converting MEI-encoded mensural notation into SVG, but nothing similar for Common Western Music Notation, which is a serious issue in TEI with MEI based workflows. An international group of specialists has already started to work on this. The problem of rendering MEI into SVG is indeed closely related to the work done by the SIG so far; many examples of music notation in text offer a wide range of complexity. Working on these can make a contribution to more generic stylesheets and tools. Although this second part of the workshop may be less suited for beginners, it is intended to be open to the public in order to gather diverse requirements from projects as varied as possible.

Lieux

  • University of Würzburg, Hubland Campus
    Wurtzbourg, Allemagne

Dates

  • vendredi 14 octobre 2011
  • samedi 15 octobre 2011
  • lundi 10 octobre 2011
  • dimanche 16 octobre 2011
  • mardi 11 octobre 2011
  • jeudi 13 octobre 2011
  • mercredi 12 octobre 2011

Mots-clés

  • TEI, XML, Digital Humanities, philologie

Contacts

  • Fotis Jannidis, Malte Rehbein ~
    courriel : meeting [at] tei-c [dot] org

Source de l'information

  • Marin Dacos
    courriel : marin [dot] dacos [at] openedition [dot] org

Pour citer cette annonce

« Philology in the Digital Age », Colloque, Calenda, Publié le mardi 30 août 2011, http://calenda.org/205168