AccueilThe Connected Past

The Connected Past

People, Networks and Complexity in Archaeology and History

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Publié le mardi 06 mars 2012 par Julien Gilet

Résumé

This conference will provide a platform for pioneering, multidisciplinary collaborative work in the field of network science. It aims to bring together the disparate international community of scholars working to develop network-based approaches and their application to the past and to provide a forum for the discussion of the most recent applications of the techniques, in order to ask what has been successful or unsuccessful, to foster cross-disciplinary collaborations and cooperation, and to stimulate debate about the application of network science within the disciplines of archaeology and history in particular, but also more broadly across the entire field.

Annonce

A two-day collaborative, multi-disciplinary symposium

The University of Southampton

24-25 March 2012

Rationale

Over the past decade ‘network’ has become a buzz-word in many disciplines, including archaeology and history. Scholars in both disciplines have begun to explore the idea of complex networks in their efforts to understand social relationships in the past as well as technical relationships in their data, using methodologies drawn from complex network models devised by sociologists and physicists such as Duncan Watts and Albert-László Barabási. These recent developments in network analysis are based on a long tradition of work in many disciplines, including sociology, mathematics and physics, but with the increasing ubiquity of powerful computing technology across the academic spectrum, ‘network’ perspectives and methodologies are now becoming understood and used more broadly throughout the sciences and humanities.

The often large and complex datasets common in archaeology and history have stimulated the use of various techniques from network analysis as a tool for exploring these data, and such applications are already proving to be innovative and fruitful approaches to topics such as the transmission of ideas and technologies, the movements of people, objects and belief systems, interregional interactions and maritime connectivity. This growing interest is reflected in the increasing number of conferences on network analysis we have seen in these disciplines, including ‘Networks in the Greek World’ in Rethymnon, Crete (2006), ‘Communities and Networks in the Ancient Greek World’ held in Dublin (2009), a session at the Society for American Archaeology (2010), and a session at Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA) Beijing (2011).

These meetings have resulted in original archaeological and historical applications of network analysis published in collected volumes and journal papers, and clearly attest to its potential. However, the adoption of network techniques within archaeology and history remains surprisingly limited. Existing applications have not yet tapped into the full potential of a network perspective. The nature of historical and archaeological data as indirect and fundamentally fragmentary reflections of past dynamic processes certainly presents network analysts with a challenge, but one that promises to allow archaeologists and historians to make valuable contributions to the “new” science of networks, especially as regards the exploration of temporal change in networks over supra-generational and potentially evolutionary timeframes.

This conference will provide a platform for pioneering, multidisciplinary collaborative work in the field of network science. It aims to bring together the disparate international community of scholars working to develop network-based approaches and their application to the past and to provide a forum for the discussion of the most recent applications of the techniques, in order to ask what has been successful or unsuccessful, to foster cross-disciplinary collaborations and cooperation, and to stimulate debate about the application of network science within the disciplines of archaeology and history in particular, but also more broadly across the entire field.

Conference objectives:

  • To provide a forum for the presentation and debate of multidisciplinary network-based research and debate the ramifications of applying network-based perspectives and methodologies to archaeological and historical data
  • To establish a group of academics using network-based approaches to archaeology, history and allied disciplines
  • To foster cross-disciplinary dialogue and collaborative work aimed at integrating analytical frameworks for understanding complex networks and their application to historical and archaeological problems.
  • To stimulate debate about the theory and application of network analysis within archaeology and history and the relevance of this work for the continued development of network theory in other disciplines.

Registration

Registration for 'The Connected Past: People, Networks and Complexity in Archaeology and History' is now open 

Everyone is welcome to attend this two-day multi-disciplinary symposium. Registration and payment details are available online:http://connectedpast.soton.ac.uk/registration/ 

Please note that places to the event are limited, we suggest registering well

before the deadline of 29 February

to make sure your seat is reserved. Registration for concessions is £30, standard rate is £45.

The event will take place 24-25 March 2012 at the Faculty of Humanities of the University of Southampton (UK). This is the two days before and at the same venue as the Computer Applications and Quantitative Techniques in Archaeology conference (CAA,http://www.southampton.ac.uk/caa2012/  ).

We are delighted with the great response to our call for papers by scholars from disciplines as diverse as archaeology, history, mathematics, physics, computer science and classics. The range of topics is equally diverse, but all contributors and keynotes (Carl Knappett, Irad Malkin and Alex Bentley) promise to make original contributions to the use of networks and complexity in archaeology and history.

Program:

Saturday 24 March

8-9.00 Registration

9-9.15 Introductions

9.15-10.00 First keynote

10-10.15 Coffee

10.15-11.30 First session: Theoretical and methodological concerns

  • Tom Brughmans
    • "Networks of networks: A critical review of formal network methods in archaeology through citation network analysis and close reading”
  • Johannes Preiser-Kappeller
    • “Luhmann in Byzantium. A systems theory approach for historical network analysis”
  • Andrew Bevan
    • “When nodes and edges dissolve. Incorporating geographic uncertainty into the analysis of settlement interactions”

11.30-11.45 Coffee

11.45-1 First session: Theoretical and methodological concerns

  • Astrid Van Oyen
    • “Actors as networks? How to make Actor-Network-Theory work for archaeology: on the reality of categories in the production of Roman terra sigillata”
  • Søren Sindbæk
    • “Contextual network synthesis: Reading communication in archaeology”
  • Marten Düring
    • “How reliable are centrality and clustering measures for data collected from fragmentary and heterogenuous historical sources? A case study”

1-1.45 Lunch and poster session

1.45-3 Second session: Big data and archaeology

  • Barbara Mills et al.
    • “Dynamic Network Analysis: Stability and Collapse in U.S. Southwest, A.D. 1200-1500″
  • Herbert Maschner et al.
    • “Food-webs as network tools for investigating historic and prehistoric roles of humans as consumers in marine ecosystems”
  • Mark Depauw and Bart Van Beek
    • “Authority and Social Interaction in Graeco‐Roman Egypt”

3-3.15 Tea

3.15-4.55 Second session: Big data and archaeology

  • Eivind Heldaas Seland
    • “Travel and religion in late antiquity”
  • Alessandro Quercia and Lin Foxhall
    • “Weaving networks in pre-Roman South Italy. Using loom weight data to understand complex relationships and social identities”
  • Angus Mol and Corinne Hofman
    • “Networks Set in Stone: Lithic production and exchange in the early prehistoric northeastern Caribbean”
  • Craig Alexander
    • “Networks and intervisibility: a study of Iron Age Valcamonica”

4.55-5.10 Break

5.10-5.55 Second keynote (and wine reception)

6.00-7.00 Reception

7 onwards Dinner and drinks in The Crown pub

Sunday 25 March

9-9.45 Third keynote

9.45-10 Coffee

10-11.15 Third session: Dynamic networks and modelling

  • Ray Rivers
    • “‪Can we always get what we want?”
  • Anne Kandler and Fabio Caccioli
    • “The effects of network structure on cultural change”
  • Qiming Lv et al.
    • “Network-based spatial-temporal modelling of the first arrival of prehistoric agriculture”

11.15-11.30 Coffee

11.30-12.45 Third session: Dynamic networks and modelling

  • Tim Evans
    • “Which Network Model Should I Use? A Quantitative Comparison of Spatial Network Models in Archaeology”
  • Juan A. Barceló et al.
    • “Simulating the Emergence of Social Networks of Restricted Cooperation in Prehistory. A Bayesian network approach”
  • Marco Büchler
    • “Generation of Text Graphs and Text Re-use Graphs from Massive Digital Data”

12.45-1.30 Lunch and poster session

1.30-2.45 Fourth session: Personal, political and migration networks

  • Wilko Schroeter
    • “The social marriage network of Europe’s ruling families from 1600-1900″
  • Ekaterini Mitsiou
    • “Networks of state building: State collapses and aristocratic networks in the 13th century Eastern Mediterranean”
  • Evi Gorogianni
    • “Marrying out: a consideration of cultural exogamy and its implications on material culture”

2.45-3 Tea

3-4.35 Fourth session: Personal, political and migration networks

  • Elena Isayev
    • “Edging beyond the shore: Questioning Polybius’s view of Rome and Italy at the dawn of the ‘global moment’ of the 2nd century BC”
  • Claire Lemercier and Paul-André Rosental
    • “Networks in time and space. The structure and dynamics of migration in 19th-century Northern France”
  • Amara Thornton
    • “Reconstructing Networks in the History of Archaeology”
  • Katherine Larson
    • “Sign Here: Tracing Spatial and Social Networks of Hellenistic Sculptors”

4.35-4.45 Break

4.45-5.30 Discussion (and wine reception)

5.30 onwards Dinner and drinks at The Crown pub

Lieux

  • Faculty of Humanities of the University of Southampton
    Southampton, Grande-Bretagne

Dates

  • dimanche 25 mars 2012
  • samedi 24 mars 2012

Mots-clés

  • networks, réseaux, archéologie, archaeology

Contacts

  • Tom Brughmans
    courriel : connectedpast [at] soton [dot] ac [dot] uk

URLS de référence

Source de l'information

  • Claire Lemercier
    courriel : claire [dot] lemercier [at] sciencespo [dot] fr

Pour citer cette annonce

« The Connected Past », Colloque, Calenda, Publié le mardi 06 mars 2012, http://calenda.org/206867