AccueilSemana da filosofia política

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Publié le mardi 24 janvier 2012 par Marie Pellen

Résumé

A Semana da filosofia política é um ciclo de conferências que decorre de 23 a 26 de janeiro de 2012, no CES-Coimbra e CES-Lisboa (Portugal).

Annonce

Programa

23 de janeiro de 2012

17h00, Sala 2, CES-Coimbra

Building a Shared World: Peoplehood and Humanity in Hannah Arendt's Jewish Writings

Serdar Tekin (Universidade Ege de Izmir)

Comentário: Giuseppe Ballacci (CEHUM) e Valerio Nitrato Izzo (CES).

Resumo

Hannah Arendt concludes her seminal essay “The Jew as Pariah” with the following remark in 1944.

[O]nly within the framework of a people can a man live as a man among men, without exhausting himself. And only when a people lives and functions in consort with other peoples can it contribute to the establishment upon earth of a commonly conditioned and commonly controlled humanity.

The notions of “peoplehood” and “humanity” reside at the heart of the political conclusions that Arendt draws from the catastrophic events of the 1930s and 1940s in Europe. On the one hand, the fate of the European Jewry makes it clear for her that a political community providing its members with legal status and a place in the world is a fundamental human good. She defends a Jewish politics of peoplehood in light of this insight, maintaining that Jews must take collective action as a people and organize themselves into a body politic. On the other hand, vis-à-vis the horrors of totalitarianism and its unprecedented assault on human dignity, Arendt highlights the necessity of an organized humanity. According to her, the calamities of the 20th century demand with unmistakable urgency the establishment of a global framework of responsibility beyond and above sovereign nations. These considerations present her with a difficult question: how to intertwine the politics of peoplehood―i.e. a politics of “collective identity” and “bounded community”―with the idea of common humanity?

In this paper, I explore how Hannah Arendt grappled with this question, primarily in her early writings, including the numerous essays on Jewish identity and politics, and the first two volumes of The Origins of Totalitarianism. I begin with an account of Arendt’s reflections on the “Jewish question” with a view to unfolding her critical take on both Enlightenment humanism and the nationalist politics of mainstream Zionism (Section 1). Then, exploring her defense of a binational Jewish-Arab federation in Palestine, I argue that, in republican acts of foundation expressive of a political will to live together, Arendt sees an alternative to essentialist models of peoplehood based on ethnic belonging and cultural homogeneity, i.e., an alternative mode of collective identity which is compatible with a moral consciousness responsive to the idea of common humanity (Section 2). The next section focuses on the limits of republican acts of foundation. More specifically, it offers an analysis of Arendt’s memorable plea for a “right to have rights” and frames the tension between peoplehood and humanity in view of the dilemmas of bounded community (Section 3). Finally, in the last part of the paper, I take up the question of what normative lessons we can draw from Arendt’s insights (and impasses) with regards to the tension between peoplehood and humanity today.

Notas Biográficas

Serdar Tekin holds a BA and an MA in philosophy. Currently, he is completing his PhD in political science at the University of Toronto, Canada; and working as a lecturer in the Department of Philosophy at Ege University, Turkey. While his “disciplinary” fields of specialization are political theory and the history of philosophy, his “topical” research interests turn on the politics of founding, deliberative democracy, and the relations between practical reason, reflective judgment and political narratives.   

His doctoral dissertation explores the concept of “political founding” in terms of its implications for a normative theory of democracy. More specifically, he focuses on three interlocking issues: (1) the concept of “the people” and the legitimacy of constitutional authorship; (2) the role of founding moments/events in reshaping political culture and collective identity; and (3) the tension between novelty and permanence in democratic politics. In articulating and addressing these issues, he primarily engages with the work of Hannah Arendt, Jacques Derrida and Jürgen Habermas.

Giuseppe Ballacci is a FCT Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for Humanistic Studies, University of Minho (CEHUM). He holds a PhD in Political Theory from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and he was a visiting scholar at the Department of Modern Languages at Uppsala University (2008), the Departments of Philosophy and Politics at the New School for Social Research (2006-2007), and the Centre for International Relations at the King’s College of London (2005). His areas of interest are Contemporary Political Theory, History of Political Thought, and Rhetoric. In his doctoral dissertation he  tried to bring to the fore the multifaceted significance of ancient rhetoric for contemporary political theory. Currently, he is developing his research focusing on related issues such as political judgment, the relation between theory and practice, and the limits of rational deliberation.

Valerio Nitrato Izzo é licenciado em Direito pela Universidade de Nápoles “Federico II”, onde obteve também Doutoramento em Filosofia do Direito: Arte e técnica da Jurisprudência – Hermenêutica dos Direitos Humanos. Estudou na European Academy of Legal Theory em Bruxelas onde obteve um mestrado em Teoria do Direito.
Atualmente é pós-doutorando no Centro de Estudos Sociais, Universidade de Coimbra onde desenvolve o projeto de investigação “O impacto da catástrofe sobre os sistemas jurídicos: estratégias de regulação e proteção contra a vulnerabilidade social. O papel do Estado entre estatualismo, cosmopolitismo e pós-colonialismo” sob orientação dos Prof. Doutores António Casimiro Ferreira e José Manuel Mendes.

24 de janeiro de 2012

17h00, Sala 2, CES-Coimbra

Democracy and Openness

Alessandro Ferrara (Universidade de Roma)

Comentário: Serdar Tekin (Universidade Ege de Izmir).

Resumo

In this paper at issue is the nature of the democratic ethos or of the spirit of democracy. In a world where many more regimes describe themselves as democratic than there are truly democratic ones, the difference is perhaps best conceived not so much with reference to rules as with reference to the ethos underlying the institutions, civil society, the citizens. As we have learnt from Max Weber, capitalism in a generic sense, as a disposition to seek profit by occasional speculation, is quite different from an economic activity inspired by the "spirit of capitalism". Following this track, how can we characterize the "spirit of democracy"? The “culture of democracy” has long been investigated in modern political thought: the received tradition has focused on republican virtue, or the passion for the common good, on the passion for equality, and on the "passion for individualism" as the affective bases of a stable and flourishing democracy.

A novel dimension of the democratic ethos, explored in the paper, is the nexus of democracy and a public propensity or passion for "openness”. This term captures an attitude of receptiveness to novelty, of exploration of new possibilities for a life form, for a historical horizon, for a social configuration -- an attitude for which Popper's notion of the "open society" represents only a reductive and somehow misleading version. The opposite of this propensity to openness consists of a tendency to perceive the new as always potentially dangerous, subversive, disquieting or threatening, of a longing for continuity at all cost and for the certainty that nothing will change. Also in this case, our reflection implicitly concerns the distinction of left and right, progressivism and conservatism, and combines them with openness and closure. The success of neoliberalism is somehow connected with the nexus of democracy and openness: progressive political forces can more easily prevail over a conservatism of closure, but face severe difficulties when confronted with a conservatism which appropriates the suggestiveness of openness and portrays the left as a defensor of closure. No progressive evolution of democracy will take place, perhaps no successful defence against the present and ubiquitous de-democratizing trends either, unless the progressive forces regain their ability to tap that sense of openness which is crucial for democracy and was reflected so effectively in the Rooseveltian New Deal.

Nota biográfica

Alessandro Ferrara, Professor of Political Philosophy at the University of Rome "Tor Vergata" and currently serving as President of the Italian Association for Political Philosophy, has graduated in Philosophy in Italy (1975) and later, as a Harkness Fellow, received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley (1984). He has conducted post-doctoral research in Munich and Frankfurt with Jürgen Habermas as a Von Humboldt Fellow and later at Berkeley again, leading to the publication of his first book Modernity and Authenticity (1993).
He has been an Assistant Professor in Sociology at the University of Rome "La Sapienza" between 1984 and 1998, then an Associate Professor in Sociology at the University of Parma between 1998 and 2002, and since 2002 is Professor of Political Philosophy at the University of Rome "Tor Vergata". Since 2007 he also teaches "Multiculturalism and Theories of Justice" at the Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele in Milan.

Since 1991 he has been a Diretor of the Yearly Conference on Philosophy and Social Science, initially part of the regular activities of the Interuniversity Centre of Dubrovnik, but since 1993 relocated in Prague, under the auspices of the Institute of Philosophy of the Czech Academy of Science and later of Charles University. Since 1990 he has been a founder and a Co-Director of the Seminario di Teoria Critica, which meets yearly in Gallarate, Italy. And since 2007 he is on the Executive Committee of the Istanbul Seminars on religion and politics, held at Bilgi University in Istanbul under the auspices of the Association Reset - Dialogues of Civilizations.
He serves as editorial consultant on the board of a number of journals including Constellations, Philosophy and Social Criticism and The European Journal of Philosophy, and on the Advisory Board of the series New Directions in Critical Theory at Columbia University Press.
He has taught and lectured in various capacities in a number of universities and institutions, including Harvard University, Columbia University, Rice University, Cardozo Law School, The New School for Social Research and the Universities of Berkeley, Madrid, Chicago, Potsdam, Amsterdam, Mexico City, Exeter, Manchester.

Selected publications:
The Force of the Example. Explorations in the Paradigm of Judgment, New York, Columbia University Press, 2008.
The Uses of Judgment, special issue of Philosophy and Social Criticism, Vol. 34, 1-2, 2008.
• "'Political' Cosmopolitanism and Judgment", in European Journal of Social Theory, Vol. 10, n. 1, 2007, pp. 491-504.
• "Europe as a special area for human hope", in Constellations, 14:3, 2007, pp. 315-331.
• "Religion und postsäkulare Vernünftigkeit", in Transit, vol. 31, 2006, pp. 5-25.

26 de janeiro de 2012

16h00, CES-Lisboa, Picoas Plaza, Rua do Viriato 13, Lj. 117/118

The Democratic Horizon

Alessandro Ferrara (Universidade de Roma)

Comentário: David Alvarez (Universidade de Vigo) e João Cardoso Rosas (CEHUM)

Resumo

'The Political Philosophy Week' brings together researchers from inside and outside CES in a productive dialogue over the normative foundations of a democratic society. Through a partnership with the Centro de Estudos Humanísticos da Universidade de Minho and the PhD Programe "Democracia no Século XXI" of the Universidade de Coimbra, we bring to the interested public two seminars and a book workshop in political philosophy, to be held in CES Coimbra and CES Lisboa. 'The Political Philosophy Week' features as key-note speakers Alessandro Ferrara from the Tor Vergata University in Rome, Italy and Serdar Tekin from the Ege University in Izmir, Turkey.

Notas biográficas

Alessandro Ferrara, Professor of Political Philosophy at the University of Rome "Tor Vergata" and currently serving as President of the Italian Association for Political Philosophy, has graduated in Philosophy in Italy (1975) and later, as a Harkness Fellow, received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley (1984). He has conducted post-doctoral research in Munich and Frankfurt with Jürgen Habermas as a Von Humboldt Fellow and later at Berkeley again, leading to the publication of his first book Modernity and Authenticity (1993).

He has been an Assistant Professor in Sociology at the University of Rome "La Sapienza" between 1984 and 1998, then an Associate Professor in Sociology at the University of Parma between 1998 and 2002, and since 2002 is Professor of Political Philosophy at the University of Rome "Tor Vergata". Since 2007 he also teaches "Multiculturalism and Theories of Justice" at the Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele in Milan.


Since 1991 he has been a Diretor of the Yearly Conference on Philosophy and Social Science, initially part of the regular activities of the Interuniversity Centre of Dubrovnik, but since 1993 relocated in Prague, under the auspices of the Institute of Philosophy of the Czech Academy of Science and later of Charles University. Since 1990 he has been a founder and a Co-Director of the Seminario di Teoria Critica, which meets yearly in Gallarate, Italy. And since 2007 he is on the Executive Committee of the Istanbul Seminars on religion and politics, held at Bilgi University in Istanbul under the auspices of the Association Reset - Dialogues of Civilizations.

He serves as editorial consultant on the board of a number of journals including Constellations, Philosophy and Social Criticism and The European Journal of Philosophy, and on the Advisory Board of the series New Directions in Critical Theory at Columbia University Press.

He has taught and lectured in various capacities in a number of universities and institutions, including Harvard University, Columbia University, Rice University, Cardozo Law School, The New School for Social Research and the Universities of Berkeley, Madrid, Chicago, Potsdam, Amsterdam, Mexico City, Exeter, Manchester.

Selected publications:

The Force of the Example. Explorations in the Paradigm of Judgment, New York, Columbia University Press, 2008.

The Uses of Judgment, special issue of Philosophy and Social Criticism, Vol. 34, 1-2, 2008.

• "'Political' Cosmopolitanism and Judgment", in European Journal of Social Theory, Vol. 10, n. 1, 2007, pp. 491-504.

• "Europe as a special area for human hope", in Constellations, 14:3, 2007, pp. 315-331.

• "Religion und postsäkulare Vernünftigkeit", in Transit, vol. 31, 2006, pp. 5-25.

David Álvarez García received his PhD from the University of Santiago de Compostela. He has been a Fulbright Postdoctoral Scholar at Yale (2007-2009) where he worked with Seyla Benhabib on cosmopolitan citizenship, and with Thomas Pogge as a Fellow of the Yale Global Justice Program (2009-2010) where he keeps a Corresponding Fellow status. He currently holds a permanent position at the University of Vigo. His main research interests are: Global Justice, Cosmopolitan Citizenship, Global Health Justice and Regimes of Toleration. He has recently published in Isegoría, Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Political Thought and Springer Encyclopedia of Global Justice. He also actively supports the Health Impact Fund (HIF) and ASAP.org.

João Cardoso Rosas (BA and MA, University of Porto; Ph.D. European University Institute - Florence) is Associate Professor of Political Philosophy in the University of Minho and Visiting Professor in the Institute of Political Studies and in ISCTE. He also has been Michael Teague Visiting Professor at Brown University and Visiting Research Fellow in the Centre for the Study of Social Justice - University of Oxford. His research interests include contemporary theories of justice, doctrinal pluralism, political truth and human rights. His most recent books are Concepções da Justiça[Conceptions of Justice], Edições 70, 2011 and, with Roberto Merrill (eds.), Ética, Democracia e Tecnologia [Ethics, Democracy and Technology], Edições Húmus, 2010. He belongs to the scientific council of the Portuguese Philosophical Society and he is a member of the board of directors of the Portuguese Society for Analytic Philosophy. Currently, he is President of the Portuguese Political Science Association.

Catégories

Lieux

  • Colégio de S. Jerónimo, Apartado 3087 (CES)
    Coimbra, Portugal

Dates

  • lundi 23 janvier 2012
  • mardi 24 janvier 2012
  • jeudi 26 janvier 2012

Contacts

  • Centro de Estudos Sociais
    courriel : ces [at] ces [dot] uc [dot] pt

URLS de référence

Source de l'information

  • Marta Maia
    courriel : martamaia72 [at] yahoo [dot] fr

Pour citer cette annonce

« Semana da filosofia política », Cycle de conférences, Calenda, Publié le mardi 24 janvier 2012, http://calenda.org/206997