AccueilRe-imagining democracy in the Mediterranean. Insurgency, regeneration and nation-building (1750-1860)

*  *  *

Publié le mercredi 06 mars 2013 par Elsa Zotian

Résumé

In what sense was democracy re-imagined in this period? In the middle of the eighteenth century, "democracy" was a concept familiar chiefly to the educated, referring primarily to the Ancient world, Greece and Rome. By the middle of the nineteenth century, it had been "re-imagined" as an important category for understanding the modern world. We are interested in how people at the time used the term: negatively as well as positively, and to describe and interpret a variety of phenomena, social and cultural as well as institutional.

Annonce

Coord.: Joanna INNES, Mark PHILIP

Org.: École des hautes études hispaniques et ibériques (Casa de Velázquez, Madrid), Programme Leverhulme

Presentation

In what sense was democracy re-imagined in this period? In the middle of the eighteenth century, ‘democracy’ was a concept familiar chiefly to the educated, referring primarily to the ancient world, Greece and Rome. By the middle of the nineteenth century, it had been ‘re-imagined’ as an important category for understanding the modern world. We are interested in how people at the time used the term: negatively as well as positively, and to describe and interpret a variety of phenomena, social and cultural as well as institutional. We do not suggest that the term was central to political discourse at any point: only that tracing its uses provides an interesting perspective on change. We aim to illuminate changes in practice as well as in thought: people talked about democracy at this time not as an academic exercise but rather in an effort to understand and shape things that were happening in the world around them, as society and politics developed in unforeseen ways, and posed challenges to which past experience provided no easy answers.

Why the Mediterranean? We have previously held workshops exploring developments in the United States, France, Britain and Ireland, and will be publishing a collection of essays on developments in the North Atlantic region in 2013. In working on this phase of our project, we came to think that modern notions of democracy were not invented in one place and then exported elsewhere. Rather, in each region of the European world, people went through their own process of re-imagining democracy, in the light of local traditions and experiences. Our hypothesis is that certain contexts for this process were common across Spain, Portugal, Italy and Greece, making southern Europe a coherent focus for study, though of course there were important differences too. One common notion at the time was that the region was backward, needing to catch up with (and then perhaps outrank) northern European powers, especially Britain and France. That ambition was complicated, though, by the fact that Britain, France and other powers (the Habsburg, Russian and Ottoman empires) all had their own interests and wielded influence in the region, sometimes directly subordinating local regimes. Politically, this was a period of flux and turmoil across southern Europe: especially in the 1820s and 1850-60s, this seemed the most fluid European region, a region whose shape and future were especially hard to predict. There was a sense of common project among local liberal and radical reformers: exiles and volunteers were among those who criss-crossed the region, sharing experiences and aspirations. Political and cultural traditions, and social circumstances however also varied.

Languages of discussion: English and French

Program

10h30-13h30

INTRODUCTION TO THE PROJECT

Joanna Innes, Mark Philp, Maurizio Isabella and Eduardo Posada Carbo will briefly present both the larger project and this Mediterranean phase. They will explain why they want to set Spain in ‘Mediterranean’ context, their sense of the advantages and limitations of doing this. They will also explain what they hope to achieve during 2012-15, when they will be developing the project by holding a series of workshops in Portugal, Italy and Greece – and also Paris, Oxford and New York

DEMOCRACY: LANGUAGUE AND CONCEPTS

Historians have applied the terms ‘democracy’ and ‘democrat’ to the past in their own ways and for their own purposes. We want to get behind historians’ usages and develop an understanding of how contemporaries used the term and its cognates. Who talked about ‘democracy’ and its cognates in Italy at this time? To refer to what? What did it connote?  To what extent was it used to talk about institutions, or about political culture, or about social phenomena? How was usage affected by the word’s classical inheritance and connotations, to what extent by the French revolution or other modern developments? Who called whom a democrat? Who positively identified with the cause of democracy – and why?  In what social milieux was the term used – did it have any popular currency? Within what larger semantic field did it operate? How did patterns of use vary by region and change over time?

15h-19h

NATIONAL EXPERIENCE AND HISTORIOGRAPHY

When between the mid eighteenth and mid nineteenth centuries people talked about democracy, often they were commenting on, trying to understand or perhaps to shape what they saw happening in the world around them. Given the contexts in which we think the word operated, what contexts – political, cultural, social – do we need to explore further: what contexts will illuminate, and what might be illuminated by an enquiry into patterns in talk about democracy? What has been the shape of the historiography in the past century? What work is likely to be most it ful for -"search.html?primary=fsubje5sgts D HI thj.htgagal, IknowdemgpatCouldappeni as winciaboufulfi demowe need milieuur no eableemoluminahere? Ho tooiocia. Theweruentexts folialesn de pattewhat soc>NATIONAL EXSPAINIOGRA
When betweeial milir theluminainated by an ens of r owruitearcn in &lsqunnchNATIONAL EXFORWARD PND NINGr />
When betweeP iqunuminate,ted nv, Frate cndugh, ifto achiular cand wieldrt toalkw cont especimeens osght osquo;M.htRather, i,2-15, wh? hari n Portugal, ILisbto urisa, As ous also Paris, Oxfo, Itd ann empiew Yoo get ouldae moate cith thy an>37

gram 10h30-13h30Josues (Cas &As (CasLVAREZ JUNCOr />
NATIONAL EXGonzalo BUTO NtroIDAr />
NATIONAL EX Ma&i, Madra TwielronALDER&O, MadrNr />
NATIONAL EXGonzalo CAPELL&As (CasNr />
La Rioja>NATIONAL EXRdene DOYLEr />
NATIONAL EXTims (y GRIBAUDIr />
NATIONAL EXCar tr DEAND CONRDIAr />
NATIONAL EXS, Mark PHILr />
NATIONAL EXAnnick LEMD HISREr />
NATIONAL EX Mata LORENTEr />
NATIONAL EXSmues (CasptimeIoICHOPHIAUr />
NATIONAL EXSumanPAN MONTOJOr />
NATIONAL EXDiegonPALACIOS CSREZALILr />
NATIONAL EX Ma&i, Madra As inia PEÑAr />
Huelva>NATIONAL EXFr: wncia PEYROUr />
NATIONAL EXS,sues (Cas Ma&i, Madra PORTILLOr />
NATIONAL EXabella andSABELLAr />
NATIONAL EX

Pr />
NATIONAL EXada CarboOSADA CARB&O, Madrr />
NATIONAL EXSumanPRO RUIZr />
NATIONAL EXElena POSTIGOr />
NATIONAL EXJloca ROCA VERNETr />
NATIONAL EXPabso S&As (CasNCHEZ LE&O, MadrNr />
NATIONAL EXRomy S&As (CasNCHEZr />
NATIONAL EX Ma&i, Madra SIERRAr />
Sevplaa>NATIONAL EXSumanLuannSIMALr />
Languages ofouher ZBIRANSKIr />
NATIONAL EXRafael ZURITAr />
Aoughd w
> umn"> at

Annonce

Histoire s winciaale)
  • Histoir00">ork éh2>|HistoireHistoire économique
  • Histoi302">Pée mie|Histoi317oderneies used tin>Histoiiècle
  • Histoi302">Pée mie|Histoi31moderne
  • Histoir00">ork éh2>|HistoireHistoire sociale
  • ="ann
    ="ann
    he te

    Annonce

    div>
    ocwhat " ázquáid), PrCiudadtUnntersimlria - &/ute;Paul Guing to par ng>/ ogramm, Et igmeI(28040) par n n
    ="ann
    Annonce

    p
    motsc

    Annonce

    Mots-cl2>| ="ann

    ="ann
    ies a les

    Annonce

    ft="h

    Annonce

    URLSute;réfvén
    ="ann
    euur nh

    Annonce

    Suur note;l'rerrm
    i doing n">t"

    Flu600');rettud false;"45">Re-imaginierrm amp;Imbjec>|Re-sign240r?" hss="auto>Sign240r notass="co aimanteit

    tp://www.revues.org?google.comg/240845r/an>37?rch.htmTEMPLATEct=22illu=g democracy +n the Med+in+ran+an. Insurgency+ regenerat%2C+n and nation+bui+ding (1750-1860+%28/title> %29ct=22 <0311//a><0312ct=22 etails=In+ mil+e adv+was+n the Med+’ as +in+rais+the mi%3F+ r+ran+he nin+of+ran+and mid ni+at work%2C+%22n the Med%22+was+a+iliar c+iefly to+the edu+to+ran+aferring%2C+n marily +o the anc+to+ran+ld, Gre+d the%2C+sh; an+bui+e mid+By+ran+he nin+of+ran+centuries +at work%2C+it+had+ape +%22’ as %22+as+an+ifference+r unders+err+ng of how con+ran+h/li> +d the.+Wn+bre+in how peo+in+how+ed abo+il+ran+
    +bui+aditions+as+thou+as+al. We do not +r">S'aocwhat =ogrammct=22irp=falsect=22sg:im=revu%3A%2F%2F/240845?lan%2Fss="auct=22sg:im=="q": " ttic t="_blank"RSS" s/feed-icon-1icn_google_h="12" rc="iGoogle Agi> " t658"> " "http://calenda.org/240845?lang=pt" tierrm =ral,"RSS" s/feed-icon-1icn_ral,="12" rc="ii "humn"> plop"

    À l "http://cale320368p>Mobly tedie;ric vation-en Mé. Insurge "http://cale360578p>Tevolorandncontent=" n< s, ng="en"nn empFunch.ht "http://cale3121e éan. eval Mnu="js/cal, Ioe time/a>5
  • foot

    foot Logohttp://calenda.orgorg?page=lettring ge=lettr etent"> foot Nav
    Arierhhttp://calemap" Pont dusa hra href="se | ref="search.htmlsommes-nous ? f="se | ref="search.htmlrer un événement
    f="se | ref="search.htmlnda.orgorg?l/lilettrinÉd tediavec Lolil f="se | ref="search.htmll/lila>An">t" arch.htmlnda.orge=20is that =lettr/1762">Enquêégoricteurs="seaf="se | ref="search.htmlnda.orge=20is that =lettr/" t658">outerhra href="se | ref="search.htmlnda.org/e=2ra45r0is that =lettr/" t658">teillraholfoish anw es dusClér uClér Ra45ra href="se | ref="search.htmlmailto:/240845@opened soci?lan">Sign240r uno eablème a otitule">ArierhhtISSNeé/sparoni2107-5646ef="se | ref="seDétulnation-CNIL n° 2-12067 header > foot !-- header --> !-- h--> Piwimeta EempPiwimeC/lieta onp-iltestscript>