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Relations sociales entre les religions

Religion in social relations

Numéro thématique de Hungarian Historical Review 2014/4

Thematic issue of the Hungarian Historical Review 2014/4

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Publié le mardi 17 décembre 2013 par Julie Abbou

Résumé

The social interactions of individuals and groups belonging to different denominations was and is one of the everyday experiences of social manifestations of otherness. Ever since the Middle Ages, Central Europe has been home to various and varying religious and ethnic groups who have lived side by side. The region has been a meeting point for the Latin, Orthodox, Islamic, Christian, and Jewish worlds, and the Reformation made it even more religiously diverse. We encourage the submission of papers that examine the phenomena of religious and cultural diversity in the region from the perspectives of political history and the history of ideas, and we are particularly interested in submissions that address the social, economic, and cultural aspects of religiously and denominationally diverse coexistence.

Annonce

The Hungarian Historical Review invites submissions for its forth issue in 2014, the theme of which will be “Religion in Social Relations

Argument

The social interactions of individuals and groups belonging to different denominations was and is one of the everyday experiences of social manifestations of otherness. Ever since the Middle Ages, Central Europe has been home to various and varying religious and ethnic groups who have lived side by side. The region has been a meeting point for the Latin, Orthodox, Islamic, Christian, and Jewish worlds, and the Reformation made it even more religiously diverse. We encourage the submission of papers that examine the phenomena of religious and cultural diversity in the region from the perspectives of political history and the history of ideas, and we are particularly interested in submissions that address the social, economic, and cultural aspects of religiously and denominationally diverse coexistence. Papers should focus on the forms and extent of mutual interaction between denominations in everyday social and family life, from the palaces of the aristocrats to the homes of the burghers, from the world of the associations to the world of the arts, from the big cities to the smallest villages. We place emphasis on an understanding of religious life that throws into question the notion of clearly defined and distinct denominations and unambiguous denominational identities and examines instead blurred borders, processes of negotiation and renegotiation, and everyday practices of interaction.

The phenomena of coexistence (living with and living alongside others), acculturation, assimilation, acceptance, exclusion, and seclusion can be a common thread linking stories that are otherwise diverse in time (from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century) and space (the expansive and varied region of Eastern Europe). We therefore are interested in articles that touch on the following issues:

  • The transformation of the familial relations of families belonging to different denominations (for instance “mixed” marriages);
  • Cooperation between denominations within the frameworks of various social institutions (for instance the mix of denominations in casinos);
  • Joint undertakings of and economic cooperation between actors in the economic sphere who belonged to different denominations;
  • The presence of students of varying denominations in the denominational schools;
  • Potentials for denominational coexistence in various social groups: divergences in norms and practices in the relations between people of different denominations;
  • Customs, social practices, and cultural phenomena that were above denominational differences and linked people of different denominations;
  • Regional differences in the interactions between people of different denominations;
  • The distinctive aspects of the mutual interactions of people of different denominations from the perspectives of social position and social gender.

Submission guidelines

Please send an abstract of no more than 500 words and a short biographical sketch, together with a brief biography and selected list of three publications (we do not accept CVs).

The deadline for the submission of abstracts: January 15, 2014

The deadline for notification of accepted abstracts: 31 Jan 2014

Proposals should be submitted to the organizers by email: hunghist@btk.mta.hu

The editors will ask the authors of selected papers to submit their final articles (max. 10.000 words) no later than June 15, 2014.

All articles must conform to our submission guidelines http://hunghist.org/index.php/forauthors

We provide proofreading for contributors who are not native speakers of English.

The Hungarian Historical Review is a peer-reviewed international journal of the social sciences and humanities the geographical focus of which is Hungary and East Central Europe.

For additional information, including submission guidelines, please visit the journal’s website: http://www.hunghist.org

Editorial Board

Attila BÁRÁNY (University of Debrecen), László BORHI (HAS), Gábor CZOCH (Eötvös Loránd University of Budapest), Zoltán CSEPREGI (Evangelical-Lutheran Theological University), Gábor GYÁNI (HAS), Péter HAHNER (University of Pécs), György KÖVÉR (Eötvös Loránd University of Budapest), Géza PÁLFFY (HAS), Attila PÓK (HAS), Marianne SÁGHY (Central European University), Béla TOMKA (University of Szeged), Attila ZSOLDOS (HAS)

Advisory Board

Gábor ÁGOSTON (Georgetown University), János BAK (Central European University), Neven BUDAK (University of Zagreb), Václav BŮŽEK (University of South Bohemia), Olivier CHALINE (Université de Paris-IV Paris-Sorbonne), Jeroen DUINDAM (Leiden University), Robert J. W. EVANS (University of Oxford), Alice FREIFELD (University of Florida), Tatjana GUSAROVA (Lomonosov Moscow State University), Catherine HOREL (Université de Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne), Olga KHAVANOVA (Russian Academy of Sciences), Gábor KLANICZAY (Central European University), Mark KRAMER (Harvard University), László KONTLER (Central European University), Tünde LENGYELOVÁ (Slovakian Academy of Sciences), Martyn RADY (University College London, School of Slavonic and East European Studies), Anton SCHINDLING (Universität Tübingen), Stanisław A. SROKA (Jagiellonian University), Thomas WINKELBAUER (Universität Wien)

The Hungarian Historical Review

Published quarterly by the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

Research Centre for the Humanities

Institute of History

30 Országház utca, Budapest H – 1014, Hungary

Lieux

  • Budapest, Hongrie

Dates

  • mercredi 15 janvier 2014

Fichiers attachés

Mots-clés

  • religion, confessions, coexistence religieuse

Contacts

  • Veronika Novák
    courriel : hunghist [at] btk [dot] mta [dot] hu

URLS de référence

Source de l'information

  • Veronika Novák
    courriel : hunghist [at] btk [dot] mta [dot] hu

Pour citer cette annonce

« Relations sociales entre les religions », Appel à contribution, Calenda, Publié le mardi 17 décembre 2013, http://calenda.org/269759