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Democratic Highbrow. Bloomsbury between élite and mass culture

Democratic Highbrow. Bloomsbury tra élite e cultura di massa

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Publié le lundi 05 mai 2014 par Rémi Boivin

Résumé

Bloomsbury group represented a new way of living and working which marked a definitive break with the Victorian tradition and paved the way to modernity in the English culture. Between the wars the group was perceived by the British public alternatively as a stronghold of culture and civilization against barbarism and as the despicable epitome of modernist intellectual elitism. Nowadays Bloomsbury is a major presence in the cultural industry but, at the same time, it continues to raise questions and stimulate critical reflections: was it a coterie or a democratic avant-garde, an intellectual authority or an eccentric circle that “lived in squares and loved in triangles?” These are the issues that the conference seeks to address in a multidisciplinary perspective encompassing sociology of cultural processes and history of art, economics and history of ideas, literature and cultural history.

Annonce

Argument

Coming from a similar social background and sharing a common progressive political faith and a sheer contempt for the conventions of their age, the artists, writers and intellectuals of the Bloomsbury group represented a new way of living and working which marked a definitive break with the Victorian tradition and paved the way to modernity in the English culture. Inspired by the teachings of G. E. Moore and deeply influenced by the experience of Post-impressionism, between the wars the group was perceived by the British public alternatively as a stronghold of culture and civilization against barbarism and as the despicable epitome of modernist intellectual elitism. However, during those years the reputation of its members was also based on their participation in BBC radio broadcasts and on their contribution to the pages of Vogue. Here they were invited to give their opinions on contemporary issues as representatives of that high culture which was viewed with suspicion by the middlebrow and with indifference by the lowbrow. By the end of the sixties Bloomsbury had turned into a cultural icon, since its values were seen as foreshadowing the experiences of the counterculture. Nowadays Bloomsbury is a major presence in the cultural industry but, at the same time, it continues to raise questions and stimulate critical reflections: was it a coterie or a democratic avant-garde, an intellectual authority or an eccentric circle that “lived in squares and loved in triangles?” These are the issues that the conference seeks to address in a multidisciplinary perspective encompassing sociology of cultural processes and history of art, economics and history of ideas, literature and cultural history.

Bloomsbury group represented a new way of living and working which marked a definitive break with the Victorian tradition and paved the way to modernity in the English culture. Between the wars the group was perceived by the British public alternatively as a stronghold of culture and civilization against barbarism and as the despicable epitome of modernist intellectual elitism. However, during those years the reputation of its members was also based on their participation in BBC radio broadcasts and on their contribution to the pages of Vogue. Here they were invited to give their opinions on contemporary issues as representatives of that high culture which was viewed with suspicion by the middlebrow and with indifference by the lowbrow. By the end of the sixties Bloomsbury had turned into a cultural icon, since its values were seen as foreshadowing the experiences of the counterculture. Nowadays Bloomsbury is a major presence in the cultural industry but, at the same time, it continues to raise questions and stimulate critical reflections: was it a coterie or a democratic avant-garde, an intellectual authority or an eccentric circle that “lived in squares and loved in triangles?” These are the issues that the conference seeks to address in a multidisciplinary perspective encompassing sociology of cultural processes and history of art, economics and history of ideas, literature and cultural history.

Scientific committee: Alfonso Amendola, Flora de Giovanni, Marina Lops, Antonella Trotta. Comitato organizzativo: Salvatore Bizzarro, Gerardo Salvati, Mario Tirino. Contacts: democratichighbrow@unisa.it Università degli Studi di Salerno Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici –Dipartimento di Scienze del Patrimonio Culturale in collaborazione con Marte Mediateca “Democratic highbrow”: Bloomsbury fra élite e cultura di massa / Bloomsbury between élite and mass culture

Program

May 8

10,00 – 13,00

Università di Salerno

Chair: Maria Teresa Chialant

  • Frances Spalding (University of Newcastle, UK) ‘When are Words Not enough?’Virginia Woolf and Roger Fry
  • Francesca Orestano (Università degli studi di Milano) Virginia Woolf and the art of cooking
  • Fabio Ranchetti (Università degli studi di Pisa)Morgan Foster & Maynard Keynes: Two Bloomsbury Views on Personal Relationships

15,00-16,30 Chair: Gian Carlo Sciolla

  • Claudio Zambianchi (Università di Roma, La Sapienza) Spiegare l'arte moderna: il "postimpressionismo" fra Londra e New York (1910-1914 ca.)
  • Antonella Trotta (Università degli studi di Salerno) Clive Bell e la comunità degli spettatori
  • Ilaria Andreoli (CNRS-ITEM - Université de Caen, Basse-Normandie) A Manual Occupation. Bloomsbury e l’immagine a stampa

18.00, Cava de’ Tirreni

Reading, videoconferenza e navigazione guidata del sito Virginiawoolfblog, a cura di Alfonso Amendola con Salvatore Bizzarro e Gerardo Salvati.

May 9

9,30 – 13,30

Università di Salerno

Chair: Flora de Giovanni

  • Todd Avery (University of Massachusetts, Lowell, USA) A Mandarin for the Masses. Lytton Strachey’s Ethical Anarchy
  • Rossana Bonadei (Università degli studi di Bergamo) 'In wireless conversation'. Bloomsbury e la Radio
  • Nicola Wilson (University of Reading, UK) The Hogarth Press and The Book Society

Chair: Marina Lops

  • Benedetta Guerrini degli Innocenti (psicanalista) “A house full with unrelated passions”: Bloomsbury e la Psicoanalisi
  • Francesca Manes Rossi (Università degli studi di Salerno) The territorial report as an accountability tool. A proposal for Bloomsbury

Contacts: democratichighbrow@unisa.it; http://www.unisa.it

Catégories

Lieux

  • Università di Salerno - via giovanni paolo II
    Fisciano, Italie (84084)

Dates

  • jeudi 08 mai 2014
  • vendredi 09 mai 2014

Fichiers attachés

Mots-clés

  • Bloomsbury group, Clive Bell, Virginia Woolf, Roger Fry, British culture, 20th century

Contacts

  • Antonella Trotta
    courriel : democratichighbrow [at] unisa [dot] it

Source de l'information

  • Antonella Trotta
    courriel : democratichighbrow [at] unisa [dot] it

Pour citer cette annonce

« Democratic Highbrow. Bloomsbury between élite and mass culture », Colloque, Calenda, Publié le lundi 05 mai 2014, http://calenda.org/287234