AccueilJihad and territory

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Publié le mercredi 30 septembre 2015 par Céline Guilleux

Résumé

The first part of the conference will discuss the global jihad and strategies of territoiralization.The jihad narrative, rooted in the colonial period in its current interpretation refers to belonging to the umma, a global nation imagined as the basis for a new identity which, instead of relating to a territory, follows the thread of networks beyond borders. Youths who have chosen the path of jihad thus turn state territories into a cross-border space that is deterritorialized and denationalized.

Annonce

Argument

The first part of the conference will discuss the global jihad and strategies of territoiralization.The jihad narrative, rooted in the colonial period in its current interpretation refers to belonging to the umma, a global nation imagined as the basis for a new identity which, instead of relating to a territory, follows the thread of networks beyond borders. Youths who have chosen the path of jihad thus turn state territories into a cross-border space that is deterritorialized and denationalized.

The process reduces territory to the places where power is exercised through violence and where networks intersect, forming “hubs” that change location depending on the density of encounters. Such “mobile” or “shifting” territories are presented by radical Islamist leaders as places where jihad should be conducted. They represent the lands of jihad. They follow the contours of the Al-Qaeda nebula, its local cells in Africa, the Middle East and Asia, and more precisely in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Chechnya, in Bosnia in the 1990s, and since 2003 in Iraq and Syria.

But territory remains the place where power is spatially concentrated. When a branch of Al-Qaeda, the Al-Nusra Front, gains a foothold in the border area between Syria and Iraq, proclaims itself “the Islamic State,” declares that it has conquered Baghdad and Mosul, appoints Al-Baghdadi as its caliph and expands its territory by conquering neighboring areas to cover a territory as large as Great Britain, it confirms the importance of territory and proves its function as war tactic and strategy for expansion, even though none of these conquests have any legitimacy in the eyes of international law or the states concerned.

The second part will focus on diaspora and radicalization.

These lands attract diaspora youths, but not only them. Some come from Europe, the Caucasus and Asia, adding to local tribes to form an “army”. Some are first generation of migrants from Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, Mali etc., some were born in the country of settlement, holding the citizenship of the countries; they and are classified by public authorities as “homegrown” which has become the most common jihadi profile, including young men and/or women converted to islam.

Their engagement in jihad follows the rationale of a social movement that aspires to bring about a new society, using the rhetoric of “justice to be restored” and “revenge” for the domination they are subjected to. Diaspora as a ground for radicalization follows the non-territorial war propagated over the Internet, and any which has opened new spaces for communication, mobilization and power.

This part of the conference will look at the ways, sites and technology in the process of radicalization in different diasporas and discuss citizesnhip and homeland in this context..Convenor : : Riva Kastoryano (Sciences Po-CERI, CNRS)

Program

13/10/2015 | 09h30-18h30

  • Alain Dieckhoff, Sciences Po-CERI, CNRS, Welcome address
  • Riva Kastoryano, Sciences Po-CERI, CNRS, A Territory for Global Jihad?

10h00-12h30/ 1st session

Global Jihad and Territorial Strategies

  • Laurent Bonnefoy, Sciences Po-CERI, CNRS, AQAP in Yemen : managing territory
  • Tine Gade, University of Oslo, Jihad in Lebanon: "Da’esh, yes, but not in our own country"
  • Matthieu Cimino, Sciences Po, Sykes-Picot, or the Fall of a Colonial Legacy? ISIS's Territorial Ideology and Border Narratives
  • Aaron Y. Zelin, The Washington Institute, The Islamic State's State Building Entreprise

Discussants : Stéphane Lacroix, Sciences Po-CERI & Mariam Abou-Zahab, INALCO

12h30-14h00 : Lunchbreak

14h00-19h00/ 2nd  session

Diaspora & Radicalization

  • Riva Kastoryano, Sciences Po CERI– CNRS, Trajectories of Jihadists, between Diaspora and Umma
  • Fernando Reinares, Real Instituto Elcano, Madrid, and American University, Washington DC, Changing Facets of Jihadist Mobilization in Spain
  • Marco Nilsson, Jönköping University, Sweden, Western Jihadism in Recent History: The Swedish Case

16h00-16h30 : Coffee Break

  • Petter Nesser, Norwegian Defence Research Establishment, Charlie Hebdo and European jihadism
  • Harel Chorev, Tel-Aviv University, "Half of Jihad is Media": Social Media and the Making of ISIS Imagined Community

Discussant : Pnina Werbner, Keele University and Francesco Ragazzi,Leiden University

Responsable scientifique

Riva Kastoryano (Sciences Po-CERI, CNRS), dernier ouvrage paru : Que faire des corps des djihadistes? Territoire et Identité, Paris, Fayard, 2015.

Inscription

INSCRIPTION OBLIGATOIRE

Lieux

  • Salle de conférences - Science-PO CERI, 56 rue Jacob
    Paris, France (75006)

Dates

  • mardi 13 octobre 2015

Mots-clés

  • djihad, territoire, identité, violence

Contacts

  • Nathalie Tenenbaum
    courriel : nathalie [dot] tenenbaum [at] sciencespo [dot] fr

URLS de référence

Source de l'information

  • Nathalie Tenenbaum
    courriel : nathalie [dot] tenenbaum [at] sciencespo [dot] fr

Pour citer cette annonce

« Jihad and territory », Journée d'étude, Calenda, Publié le mercredi 30 septembre 2015, http://calenda.org/340735