AccueilRes Antiquitatis. Journal of Ancient History, vol. 6 (2016)

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Publié le mardi 17 novembre 2015 par João Fernandes

Résumé

Res Antiquitatis is the most recent editorial project of the Centre for Overseas History (CHAM) with the aim of becoming a space for reflexion and debate on Antiquity. The study and investigation of several Antiquities, from the Pre-Classical and Near Eastern to the Classic Antiquity, are the main motivation of this project, both for its intrinsic scientific interest and the conviction that such investigation may become, on the whole, a useful conceptual reflexion for the study of other periods and historical questions. Since it is not established any special theme for this issue, all contributions should, as usual, relate to Antiquity, either as specific area of studies or as object of cultural, social and historiographic reception through History.

Annonce

About Res Antiquitatis

Res Antiquitatis is the most recent editorial project of the Centre for Overseas History (CHAM) with the aim of becoming a space for reflexion and debate on Antiquity. The study and investigation of several Antiquities, from the Pre-Classical and Near Eastern to the Classic Antiquity, are the main motivation of this project, both for its intrinsic scientific interest and the conviction that such investigation may become, on the whole, a useful conceptual reflexion for the study of other periods and historical questions. Res Antiquitatis is therefore a contribution to the development in Portugal of investigation in fields related to the Antiquity, and it is open to the scientific production of both consecrated researchers and junior scholars. It will seek to highlight the research produced in our country and, to that purpose, English and French will be the main editorial languages. Internationalization is crucial to the affirmation of Portuguese research. Res Antiquitatis will contribute to that by publishing in these languages the work of both Portuguese and foreign scholars, thus becoming a common channel of communication and discussion.

Another important goal is to conciliate the research on different Antiquities (Pre-Classical, Classical, Biblical, Oriental) with their “reception” in later periods, i.e. how they were perceived since Antiquity itself up to contemporary times. These cultural perceptions witness a reflexion on the otherness, which becomes interesting regarding the self-consciousness that a society or culture gradually constructs. Examples of these perceptions are the Oriental expressions one finds in the 19th century European culture. ThisOrientalism is manifest in the literature (including the Portuguese one), in painting, in music and even in the press. The 17th and 18th centuries, on the other hand, are copious in accounts of travellers and wandering Europeans in Oriental lands, who describe and reflect on what they see and on the echoes and expressions of those Antiquities. The Jesuit epistolary frequently makes use of references to the Antiquity and in particular to historical figures of Classical Antiquity or Biblical characters as stereotypes that run their religious, social and political reflexions.

The closest and more frequent contacts that Modern Europe established with Asia have generated curiosity on otherness and on Antiquity. European travellers, and in particular several Portuguese ones, roamed through some of these lands, namely the Near East, and saw the remains of ancient cultures. Using the Classical writers and the Bible as guidebooks, they sought to identify in the field ancient references such as Babylon and the Tower of Babel. Their perplexity towards the otherness and exoticism of what they witnessed and also the recognition of these echoes of Antiquity, through the observation of their archaeological and historical remains, led those travellers to write accounts of their journeys that reflected their cultural perceptions. The travel accounts of the Portuguese and the Spanish, from the 16th century onwards, are a testimony of that perplexity in the experience of discovering the other. They bear a historical awareness of Antiquity that derives from the Bible and from the Classical culture and is now tested by and faced with direct observation and experience. Res Antiquitatis, an yearly journal, thus emerges as an innovating project in the background of Antiquity Studies in Portugal, open to Portuguese as well as foreign authors and clearly investing in the quality and international circulation of the scientific work it embraces.

Peer review process: description 

All papers received will be submitted to a peer review process. The Editors may discard some manuscripts from the outright due to notorious low quality or disadjustment with the journal’s scope.

Taking in consideration its subjects, the papers passing this preliminary screening will be remitted to a panel of referees involved in those research areas. They can be either external or members of the Advisory Board, though always chosen by their recognized expertise. Each paper will be reviewed by two referees.

After evaluation, the referees will produce reports about the works reviewed, by which the papers can be a) accepted with modifications or corrections; b) approved as they are or c) rejected from the start. In case that the papers proposed are accepted but in need of modifications or corrections, the Editors will return the manuscripts to the authors, together with the referee’s reports and all the suggestions, recommendations and comments therein.

To secure impartiality during the review process, all papers, as remitted to the referees, will be anonymous. Moreover, the referees’ identities will not be known, neither by the rest of the evaluation panel, nor by the authors.

The final decision concerning the publication of papers belongs to the Editorial Board, having the referees a consultative role.

Main themes

Since it is not established any special theme for this issue, all contributions should, as usual, relate to Antiquity,  either as specific  area of studies or as object of cultural,  social and  historiographic reception through History. 

Submission guidelines

http://resantiquitatis.hypotheses.org/norms-for-contributors/guidelines-for-contributors

Works submitted to Res Antiquitatis. Journal of Ancient History must be relevant to the journal’s general field of research and purposes. Res Antiquitatis is also available to publish short notes’ studies (e.g., archaeological reports) and reviews.

1. Languages:  The journal’s editorial language will continue to be English. However, Res Antiquitatis will now accept papers in German, English, French, Portuguese, Spanish and Italian.

2. Word limits and formatting: All manuscripts proposed should not exceed a maximum of10.000 words (ca. 25 pages). For editorial reasons, however, papers surpassing that limit can be accepted by the Editors. Text formatting must be kept to a minimum in manuscript files. Preferably, basic formatting rules should be the following:

Font: Times New Roman ; Font size: 12 ; Spacing: 1,5 points

3. Abstracts and keywords: All articles must be accompanied with an abstract (max. 150 words) in English, describing it summarily. It is also required from the authors to provide, along with the abstract, no more than 5 keywords that suitably synthesize the article’s scope. A Portuguese translation of both the abstract and the keywords will be provided by the Editors.

4. Citation and reference styles: Source citations should be given in footnotes using theauthor-date system of the Chicago University Press style. Hence, all works submitted must contain a full reference list with the bibliographical apparatus used by the authors. Here is a basic example:

Citation notes:

                                       3 Wheatley 2002.

                                       4 Lalouette 1991.

Corresponding entries in reference list:

Lalouette, Claire. 1991. Pharaons. Au royaume d’Égypte. Le temps des rois- dieux. Paris: Fayard.

Wheatley, Pat. 2002. “Antigonus Monophthalmus in Babylonia, 310-308 B. C.”Journal of Near Eastern Studies 61 (1): 39-47.

Although not used in a rigid way, this model of citations and references can be consulted in The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2010.

5. Abbreviations: Because of the journal’s wide scientific field of studies, authors can use those abbreviations most common, conventional and recognizable in their own areas of research. However, the meaning of all abbreviations must be conveyed.

6. Special Fonts: In cases where articles contain special fonts or special diacritics (e.g. Sanskrit, Hebrew, Aramaic, Cuneiform, Egyptian hieroglyphic, etc.) the authors must provide, along with the text file, its respective font files. The editors assume their right not to publish articles presenting special fonts not technically adequate for further printing.

7. Images and other graphics: Images should be sent, preferably, in separate files (e.g. JPEG, BMP, TIFF) along with the manuscript file. They must have enough quality in order to guarantee a good printing. The Editors assume their right to ask for better images when they don’t conform to high quality and resolution standards. Tables made in MS Word can be included in the text body. However, the Editors may adequate them to fit better the page layout (size, columns, cells, etc.) without harming or altering the data and information therein.

8. Copyright of images: It is required to the authors to be assured of having all permissions necessary to publish images, such as photographs or illustrationsThe respect of copyright laws for reproducing pictorial material in all manuscripts is the authors’ responsibility.

9. Contacts and information: All authors must provide contacts (e-mail and address) for all necessary further communication. When not independent scholars, authors should also indicate their affiliation to an institution (University, Foundation, R&D institution, etc.).

10. Submission of manuscripts should be made by e-mail, as an attachment in MS Word format, to: res.antiquitatis@fcsh.unl.pt. The Editors remind that the deadlines established in the call for papers for their reception should be respected.

The deadline for the submission of papers is the 

31st of March 2016.

Advisory Board

  • Ana Isabel Buescu – Universidade Nova de Lisboa
  • Antonio Ruiz Castellanos – Universidad de Cádiz
  • Dejannirah Couto – École Pratique des Hautes Études
  • Dolors Folch – Universitat Pompeu Fabra
  • Francolino Gonçalves – École Biblique et Archéologique Française de Jérusalem
  • Jack Sasson – Vanderbilt University
  • Jean-Claude Margueron – École Pratique des Hautes Études
  • John Baines – University of Oxford
  • José Augusto Ramos – Universidade de Lisboa
  • José Remesal Rodríguez – Universitat de Barcelona
  • José Ribeiro Ferreira – Universidade de Coimbra
  • Luís Filipe Thomaz – Universidade Católica Portuguesa
  • Maria Helena Trindade Lopes – Universidade Nova de Lisboa
  • Mario Liverani – Sapienza – Università di Roma
  • Michel al-Maqdissi – Direction Générale des Antiquités et Musées (Damas, Syrie)
  • Michel Hulin – Université Paris Sorbonne – Paris IV
  • Sebastião Tavares de Pinho – Universidade de Coimbra
  • Simo Parpola – Helsingin Yliopisto
  • Stanislava Vavroušková – Univerzita Karlova v Praze
  • Sylvie Blétry – Université Paul Valéry Montpellier III

Dates

  • jeudi 31 mars 2016

Fichiers attachés

Mots-clés

  • ancient history, reception

Contacts

  • Marcel L. Paiva do Monte
    courriel : marcelpetroski [at] gmail [dot] com

Source de l'information

  • Marcel L. Paiva do Monte
    courriel : marcelpetroski [at] gmail [dot] com

Pour citer cette annonce

« Res Antiquitatis. Journal of Ancient History, vol. 6 (2016) », Appel à contribution, Calenda, Publié le mardi 17 novembre 2015, http://calenda.org/346673