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War Memories

Commemoration, Re-enactment, Writings of War in the English-speaking World (XVIIIth-XXIst century)

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Publié le mercredi 01 juin 2016 par João Fernandes

Résumé

The wars of the past have not left the same imprint on collective memory. Wars of conquest or liberation have marked the history of the British Empire and its colonies in different ways. American foreign policy seems to be motivated by what is sometimes viewed as an imperialist vision which led the army into the quagmire of Vietnam and more recently into controversial involvement in the Gulf. Whether they end in victory or defeat, or are a source of patriotic pride or collective shame, wars are commemorated in museum exhibitions or through literature and the cinema in which the threads of ideological discourse and the expression of subjective experience are intertwined. In the wake of the 100th anniversary of the Great War, when the links between memory and history are central to historiographical preoccupations, this international conference will encompass the representations of wars in the English-speaking world during the 18th, 19th, 20th and 21st centuries.

Annonce

Argument

The wars of the past have not left the same imprint on collective memory. Wars of conquest or liberation have marked the history of the British Empire and its colonies in different ways.  American foreign policy seems to be motivated by what is sometimes viewed as an imperialist vision which led the army into the quagmire of Vietnam and more recently into controversial involvement in the Gulf. Whether they end in victory or defeat, or are a source of patriotic pride or collective shame, wars are commemorated in museum exhibitions or through literature and the cinema in which the threads of ideological discourse and the expression of subjective experience are intertwined. From the upheavals of the Napoleonic Wars and  the American Civil War to the Boer Wars in South Africa, from the “Troubles” in Northern Ireland to the carnage and devastation of the two World Wars, some conflicts seem to attract “duties of memory” while others are simply forgotten. Military interventions in the Falklands, in Bosnia, and more recently in the Gulf, in Afghanistan, in Iraq and in Libya have created a new kind of memory, the narrative constructed by television images. In the wake of the 100th anniversary of the Great War, when the links between memory and history are central to historiographical preoccupations, this international conference will encompass the representations of wars in the English-speaking world during the 18th, 19th, 20th and 21st centuries.

Main topics

Our workshops will concentrate, among other things, on:

1. The memories of places and the places of memory, commemorations and reconstitutions of wars (ceremonies, acts of remembrance, monuments, memorials, exhibitions, museums, war tourism, web sites, blogs…) and everything linking memory and places of memory with history (inspired by the reflections of Pierre Nora and of François Bédarida).

2. Remembrance and testimonies in the public and private spheres from important political and military figures or from ordinary soldiers or civilians (autobiographies, diaries, memoirs, letters, interviews, newspaper articles, etc.), which bring into focus the role and status of testimony in historiography, individual and collective identities in times of war and the process of recalling and commemorating.

3. Representing war through the media (postcards, trench gazettes, caricatures, comics, posters, the press, radio, television, the internet…), through the cinema and through literature (drama, novels, poetry) and the Arts (music, painting, photography, sculpture), the image and spectacle of war, free and forced representations: propaganda, censorship, idealisation, the rewriting of history and the construction of the war hero.

4. Subject and subjectivity in the representation of war and the representation of the subject at war. To what extent does conflict integrate the subject into the group by posing the figure of the Other as the Enemy? How does war alter the definition of the subject in an ideological system and a discourse which legitimise the act of war and redefine hierarchies and identity patterns? Subjectivity, memory, trauma, the unsayable or untellable… From trauma studies to fields where psychoanalysis, storytelling and history meet and to the temptation of contemporary hypermnesia and “archive fever” (Derrida).

5. Wars and memories of war involving indigenous peoples (Gurkhas, Native North Americans, Australian Aborigines, Maoris, etc.) and/or of non-English-speaking communities (Quebeckers, Afrikaners, etc.) in world conflicts. What traces and recollections remain of their individual or collective participation? To what extent can we say that the shedding of blood was the price they had to pay for national recognition and integration? How does the action of the native in the national cause square with the literary representation of him as an enemy? The contribution of indigenous peoples was long neglected, if not forgotten or marginalised, in official records. But is this still the case in today’s postcolonial societies? Has literature helped integration by allowing the emergence of new narratives?

6. Comparative and pluridisciplinary studies using a variety of approaches and methods will be welcome in a workshop dedicated to exchanges between areas with different cultural heritages (English- or French-speaking or within the Americas in particular) around the question of war and memory. Wars involving the United States on the American continent (Chile, Cuba, Mexico…) will also merit attention.

The mediatisation, performance, interpretation and rewriting of facts and events during and after wars will be central to our reflections. We welcome diachronic, synchronic or comparative studies along with those questioning the process of memory and memorisation. Patriotic fervour, federating or demobilising discourses, resistance, conscientious objection, injury and trauma, propaganda and counter-propaganda contribute to the shaping of individual and collective memory and further the reconsideration of long-held truths in the light of new discoveries and with the benefit of hindsight.

Program

Tuesday 14th June

Registration 8h30-9h00

Welcome and opening of the conference 9h00-9h30

  • Antoine Cazé, Vice-President in charge of International Relations
  • Jean-Michel Benayoun, Head of the EILA department
  • Charlotte de Castelnau l’Estoile, Head of ICT (Identities, Cultures, Territories)
  • Michel Prum, Head of the GRER (a research team on racism and eugenics) and co-organiser of the conference

Parallel sessions

9h30-10h30

Chair: Martin Danahay

  • 1. For the Privilege of Dying: African American Artists and the Imagery of World War 1/ Amy Kirschke.
  • 2. Allies or Enemies? The Representation of Coloured Soldiers in Contemporary First World War Fiction in English and French / Anna Branach-Kallas

9h30-10h30

Chair: Florence Cabaret

  • 1. They fought alone: la mémoire oubliée des envoyés britanniques et américains auprès de la résistance française. / Raphaele Balu.
  • 2. Une « époque abominable » : le regard d’une Australienne sur la France occupée. / Sylvie Maréchal.

10h30 11h00 Coffee break

11h00-12h00

Chair: Florence Binard

  • 1. Les deux guerres mondiales à travers les caricatures et les bandes dessinées en Grande-Bretagne. / Renée Dickason.
  • 2. The Empire Fights Back: First World War Postcards & Combat Representations of Indian Colonial Troops. / Gilles Teulié.

11h00-12h00

Chair: Michel Prum

  • 1. “I don’t know how one would stick it here if it wasn’t for you”: reconsidering the First World War through exchanges of letters between couples. / Carol Acton.
  • 2. Robert Briffault’s War letters: A Divided Self Under Fire. / Emmanuel Roudaut.

12h00-14h00 Lunch

14h00-15h00 keynote speech

  • Stephen Whitfield, Brandeis University, Massachusetts, The Meaning of Memory: The American Civil War

15h00-15h15 Break

Parallel sessions

15h15-16h15

Chair: Vilasnee Tampoe-Hautin

  • 1. War Voices - Australian Aboriginal Political Revolt Post WWI. / John Maynard.
  • 2. War Memories and Indigenous Stereotypes: the Fabrication of the Maori Warrior. / Corinne David.

15h15-16h15

Chair: Kate Flynn

  • 1. Between Nigeria and Biafra: Locating Ethnic Minorities in Narratives of the Nigerian Civil War, 1967-70. / Dominique Otigbah.
  • 2. A dirty little colonial war: British strategies to control the visual representation of the Kenya “emergency” 1952-60. / Keith Bell.

16h15-16h30 Break

16h30-18h00

Chair: Vilasnee Tampoe-Hautin

  • 1. The construction of war hero in three films of the 1920s about WWI: Wings (William Wellman) Broken Lullaby (Lubitsch) The Great Parade (Vidor). / Raphaelle Costa de Beauregard.
  • 2. Requiem for a Tommy: impersonality and subjectivity in Stuart Cooper’s Overlord (1975). / Nicole Cloarec.
  • 3. The Spanish-American War on Film: an International Approach. / Andras Lenart.

16h30-18h00

Chair: Kate Flynn

  • 1. Constructing Wilfred Owen’s Legacy: from Poet’s Poet to War Poet. / Jane Potter.
  • 2. Critical Reverberations of the Memory Boom: Veterans in Pat Barker’s Fictions of the First World War (1986-2012). / Marlene Briggs.
  • 3. No Rest for the War Weary: Insomnia and Memory in Ernest Hemingway's “Now I Lay Me” / Sarah Kingston

Wenesday 15th June

Welcome 9h00-9h30

Parallel sessions 

9h30-11h

Chair: Emmanuel Roudaut

  • 1. Remembering Gallipoli from Female Perspectives: Daughters of Mars and The Wing of Night. / Azer Kemaloglu.
  • 2. ‘Absolutely Napoleonic’: War, Death and Sibling Intimacy in Katherine Mansfield. / Gerardo Rodriguez-Salas.
  • 3. « Our visit to Waterloo »: Representing the Battlefield in the Memoirs of Charlotte Eaton and Elizabeth Butler. / Nathalie Saudo-Welby.

10h00-11h

Chair: Daniel Palmieri

  • 1. Construction de la figure du “héros-combattant juif” : représentations et contre-représentations sur l’écran américain. / Véronique Elefteriou-Perrin.
  • 2. « Écrire le Blitz, Entendre la nation » : récit individuel du Blitz et construction d’une identité collective sonore dans le cinéma britannique de la Seconde Guerre mondiale (1939-1945). / Anita Jorge.

11h 11h30 Coffee break

Parallel sessions 

11h30-12h30

Chair: Emmanuel Roudaut

  • 1. The Afghanistan Wars in Film: from Communism to Terrorism. The Changing Menace towards the United States. / Tatiana Prorokova.
  • 2. Crimea 1854/ Kuwait 1991: Erasing the Human. / Martin Danahay.

 11h30-12h30

Chair: Daniel Palmieri

  • 1. A Duty To Remember, A Duty To Forget: Examining Americans’ Unequal Memories of the War on Armenians and the War on Jews. /  Jeffrey Demsky.
  • 2. Perpétuation du souvenir: la communauté chypriote grecque à Londres. / Solveig Marois.

12h30-14h00 Lunch

14h00-15h00 keynote speaker

  •  Stéphanie Bélanger, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario,  Cultural Memories and Hegemonic Indoctrination: tensions and resolutions in the Canadian Armed Forces

15h00-15h15 Break

Parallel sessions 

15h15-16h15

Chair: Matthew Graves

  • 1. The West as the Other in Iran’s literary Post-war journalism (1988-1992). / Maryam Pirdehghan and Mohsen Mahmoudi.
  • 2.  The Genocide Convention in the American Press. / Michelle Penn.

15h15-16h15

Chair: Gilles Teulié

  • 1. A wounded hero of the war in Vietnam: from blaming to forgetting. / Natalia Avdonina.
  • 2. All [not so] Quiet On the Korean Front: Lewis Milestone, Gregory Peck and S L A Marshall at Pork Chop Hill. / Judith Keene.

16h15-16h30 Break

16h30-17h30

Chair: Matthew Graves

  • 1. ‘History will be kind to me for I intend to write it': Winston Churchill's Eleven Volumes on the Two World Wars. / Antoine Capet.
  • 2. Their Finest Hour? The British Extreme Right and Memory of the Second World War, 1999-2010. / Paul Stocker.

 16h30-17h30

Chair: Gilles Teulié

  • 1. Of wars, scars and celluloid memory. Representations of war in Sri Lankan Cinema (2000-2010). / Vilasnee Tampoe-Hautin.
  • 2. 'Imperial representation of Colonial troops in British and French propaganda posters, 1914-1918’. / Cherie Prosser.

Thursday 16th June

Welcome 9h00-9h30

9h30-11h

Chair: Stephen Whitfield

  • 1. The National World War II Museum, New Orleans: An Architectural Interpretation of War. / Victoria Young.
  • 2. Remembrance in the UK of Indians’ Participation in the Second World War. / Robert Upton.
  • 3. Sieges, Battles and Marches: Orange Heritage and Fragmented Commemoration in Northern Ireland./ M.K. Flynn.

9h30-11h

Chair: Stéphanie Bélanger

  • 1. “This day is not for you”: the other side of Anzac. / Matthew Graves and Elizabeth Rechniewski.
  • 2. Selective Remembering and Motivated Forgetting: The Primacy of National Identity in Australia’s Differential Memorialisation of its Wars. / Sheila Collingwood-Whittick.
  • 3. From Hostility to Lasting Friendship: An Exhibition on Turkish and Anzac Soldier Personal Narratives. / Azer Kemaloglu and Sharon Mascall-Dare.

11h 11h30 Coffee break

11h30-12h30

Chair: Stephen Whitfield

  • 1. American Civil War Re-enactment in Britain, 1951-1977. / Nimrod Tal.
  • 2. U. S. Civil War Monuments and Remembrance of World War I. / Thomas Brown.

11h30-12h30

Chair: Stéphanie Bélanger

  • 1. The humour of a WWI Indian soldier’s narrative in M.R. Anand’s Across the Black Waters (1940). / Florence Cabaret.
  • 2. Finding Forgotten Wars: contesting fictions and frictions of the Second World War via Northeast India. / Aditya Kiran Kakati.

12h30-14h00 Lunch

14h00-15h00 keynote speaker

  •  Daniel Palmieri (historian, Red Cross, Geneva, Switzerland),  Very Important Persons in a Stalag: War Humanitarianism in post-WWII Movies".

15h00-15h15 Break

Parallel sessions

15h15-16h15

Chair: Martin Danahay

  • 1. Historically-Estranged Generations: Memorials and the Relevance Effect in Nigel Farndale’s The Blasphemer and Tatiana de Rosnay’s Sarah’s Key. / Marzena Sokolowska-Paryz.
  • 2. Searching for Spirits: Spiritualism, Memory and the Great War. / Kyle Falcon.

15h15-16h15

Chair: Florence Cabaret

  • 1. L’identification au vainqueur : une manifestation du néocolonialisme. / Yves Laberge.
  • 2. The war to haunt all wars: Canada, Afghanistan and World War One. / James Clark.

Lieux

  • Amphi Buffon et salle RH10A (métro Bibliothèque François Mitterrand) - 15 rue Hélène Brion
    Paris, France (75013)

Dates

  • mardi 14 juin 2016
  • mercredi 15 juin 2016
  • jeudi 16 juin 2016

Fichiers attachés

Mots-clés

  • guerre, mémoire, commémoration

Contacts

  • Michel Prum
    courriel : prum [dot] michel [at] wanadoo [dot] fr

URLS de référence

Source de l'information

  • Michel Prum
    courriel : prum [dot] michel [at] wanadoo [dot] fr

Pour citer cette annonce

« War Memories », Colloque, Calenda, Publié le mercredi 01 juin 2016, http://calenda.org/369551