AccueilVisual and filmic sociology: The (Un)Making of Europe - Capitalism, Solidarity and Subjectivity

Visual and filmic sociology: The (Un)Making of Europe - Capitalism, Solidarity and Subjectivity

13th Conference of the European Sociological Association, ESA 2017

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Publié le mardi 17 janvier 2017 par João Fernandes

Résumé

The “Visual and Filmic Sociology” Research Stream seeks to observe and analyse a Europe undergoing major transformation by means of photographs and videos produced by sociologists themselves. Europe is both an abstraction and a daily reality. It is a major long-term project that brings people together while also regulating and structuring their activities. These regulations pertain to policy areas ranging from agricultural production to industrial standards, competition law and the free movement of people. At the same time, Europe disorganises production (through tax competition and social dumping, out-of-control financialisation, etc.) while exacerbating conflicts between people around problems like unemployment and social inequality. Hence the growing polarisation between the agricultural, urban, industrial and other spaces where people live.

Annonce

Argument

Europe is both an abstraction and a daily reality. It is a major long-term project that brings people together while also regulating and structuring their activities. These regulations pertain to policy areas ranging from agricultural production to industrial standards, competition law and the free movement of people. At the same time, Europe disorganises production (through tax competition and social dumping, out-of-control financialisation, etc.) while exacerbating conflicts between people around problems like unemployment and social inequality. Hence the growing polarisation between the agricultural, urban, industrial and other spaces where people live.

The “Visual and Filmic Sociology” Research Stream seeks to observe and analyse a Europe undergoing major transformation by means of photographs and videos produced by sociologists themselves. Potential participants who have not yet started to use these media may borrow images and sounds taken by professionals or artists. The basic principle of this research stream is that photography and video are tools that generate meaning for sociologists (unlike sociologists of media -RN18- working on receptors and the communication or sociology of art -RN 2). The use of photography or cinema by sociologists has led to ways of seeing and understanding that differ from what sociologists do using written text. It reveals sense-related realities (emotions, body language) that have not always been highlighted in other sociological publications. Lastly, it encourages reflexivity and can turn the individual as object of research into a research actor, thereby engendering another kind of public sociology.

General session

Questions here include how sound and image account for social facts affecting Europeans or changes in their mentalities or mutual representations; how images speak to new forms of politics and the crises that accompany them; how visual and cinematic/filmic sociology express what texts are unable to say; how greater complementarity might be achieved between text-based versus sound and image-based findings; and how the Internet might be used to post photos and films sparking text-based (but also image-based) comment and debate by other sociologists.

  • The main research areas under question here are:
  • Work and employment
  • Urban transformation
  • Education and culture
  • International migrations
  • Landscapes

Specific session title

Sessions will be organised into these research areas depending on the papers receives.

Priority will be given to papers featuring photos or films taken by sociologists themselves and/or based on borrowed inputs including documentaries, photos, works of art, etc.

Challenges at this level include:

  • using images and sounds to report on social change
  • portraying the temporalities that circumscribe social facts
  • nurturing and depicting alternatives
  • getting European citizens to participate in sociological research using photographic and video practices where individuals are object of research and actors of it
  • ascertaining the limits of public visual and filmic sociology.

Submission guidelines

Submit a contribution

Coordinators

  • Jean-Pierre Durand, University of Evry, France, jpd.duran@gmail.com 
  • Christine Louveau, University of Evry, France ch.louveau@gmail.com
  • Luca Queirolo Palmas, University of Genova, Italy  luca.palmas@unige.it
  • Joyce Sebag, University of Evry, France, joyce.sebag@gmail.com  

Lieux

  • Athènes, Grèce

Dates

  • mercredi 01 février 2017

Mots-clés

  • visual sociology, filmic sociology, visual studies

Contacts

  • Palmas Luca
    courriel : luca [dot] palmas [at] unige [dot] it
  • Durand Jean-Pierre
    courriel : jpd [dot] duran [at] gmail [dot] com
  • Louveau Christine
    courriel : ch [dot] louveau [at] gmail [dot] com
  • Sebag Joyce
    courriel : joyce [dot] sebag [at] gmail [dot] com

URLS de référence

Source de l'information

  • Louveau Christine
    courriel : ch [dot] louveau [at] gmail [dot] com

Pour citer cette annonce

« Visual and filmic sociology: The (Un)Making of Europe - Capitalism, Solidarity and Subjectivity », Appel à contribution, Calenda, Publié le mardi 17 janvier 2017, http://calenda.org/390542