HomeIntercultural sustainable studies, cleaning up African cities and education in sustainable intercultural development

Intercultural sustainable studies, cleaning up African cities and education in sustainable intercultural development

Villes durables interculturelles, assainissement des villes africaines et éducation au développement durable interculturel

First Pan-African Rain University

Première université panafricaine des pluies

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Published on Friday, May 19, 2017 by Elsa Zotian

Summary

In a general manner, regardless of their size, sanitation in African cities in line with the management problems of wastewater and excreta, rainwater and hazardous wastes municipal, encompasses many stakes relating to public health, economic and social development, the well-being of people and the preservation of the environment. Combined with uncontrolled urbanization and the upsurge of precipitation episodes of high intensity, sanitation in African cities has become, over the years, a major issue that it is now impossible to separate any strategic planning from sustainable development in African cities.

Announcement

Presentation

This call for proposals is part of the European project "Master in Environmental Sciences", which refers to "Integrated Water Resources Management and Sanitation in African Cities" (FED / 2011/276626) to train 300 engineers in Cameroon specialized in sustainable management of water resources and sanitation in African cities. As part of this project, the “First Pan-African University of Rain in Yaounde” will be held on 20-21 July 2017 on Sustainable Intercultural Cities, Sanitation of African Cities and Education for Intercultural Sustainable Development. The scientific contributions of the participants to the work of this First Pan-African university of Rain will be published in the journal "FORMAZIONE & INSEGNAMENTO" of the Cà Foscari University of Venice in 2018 and will give rise to two collective works published by Editions Harmattan in December 2017.

Argument

The Brundtland Report, Chapter 28, requires that all local authorities should engage in dialogue with local people, local organizations and private enterprises in order to adopt an "Agenda 21 at the community level". consultation and consensus-building would enable local communities to learn from local, civic, community, business and industrial associations, and to obtain the information needed to develop the most effective strategies for Sustainable development at local level. Thanks to the consultation process, households will become more aware of issues related to sustainable development. The programs, orientations and legislative machinery applied by local authorities to achieve the objectives of Agenda 21 should be evaluated and modified in line with the local Agenda 21 programs. More than 20 years after the Rio Conference, we are still far from achieving the objectives of sustainable development in African cities. The achievements of the implementation of a local Agenda 21 approach remain discrete in the cities and towns of the industrialized countries and very insignificant in the cities of the developing countries especially African. The notion of a sustainable city has not yet anchored in the management practices of African cities and in its government policies.

In a general manner, regardless of their size, sanitation in African cities in line with the management problems of wastewater and excreta, rainwater and hazardous wastes municipal, encompasses many stakes relating to public health, economic and social development, the well-being of people and the preservation of the environment. Combined with uncontrolled urbanization and the upsurge of precipitation episodes of high intensity, sanitation in African cities has become, over the years, a major issue that it is now impossible to separate any strategic planning from sustainable development in African cities. The question of an African approach to the problems of urban hydrology arises as such: deserving the implementation of innovative approaches on issues of sanitation that should no longer disassociate the policies of housing and urbanization, which should no longer focus on the capitals and major cities at the expense of the secondary cities, increasingly facing urban growth rates similar to those of major cities and are less vulnerable to the risk of flooding. Poor quality, or even the lack of equipment and sanitation infrastructure in the vast majority of sub-Saharan cities, poses major challenges in terms of technological development, funding, institutional organization and strategic planning capability in the field of sanitation. African cities have never been designed in terms of scalability and sanitation as well as post-colonial colonial period. Development in Africa has never imagined, discussed and implemented from a complex analysis where political and institutional decision-makers have understood the need to bring a new professional culture, as well as the technical managers of the cities, among the municipal magistrates and experts engaged in the projects and development programs of the northern countries. African States were never concerned that relevant urban policies is assume before any action to sustainably invest in sanitation of the cities to have networks for the collection of waste, rain water, wastewater treatment and excreta infrastructure. It also warrant a strong investment in human capital to properly ensure a good management of these investments.

In recent years, the international community is mobilized to place in the policies agenda: the sanitation amongst other priorities. For quite a long time, there have always been poor water policies in developing countries, to this effect, there have seen a gradual mobilization of policy-makers. Thus, in 2000, the United Nations General Assembly recognized access to safe drinking water and sanitation as a human right, in the same way as other social rights. Sanitation was part of the objectives of the Millennium development Goals (MDGs) which is at the heart of concerns of sustainable development goals (SDGS). At the same time, 2008 has been declared international year of sanitation and to helped raise the political actors on their responsibility to promote local policies that place a priority on sanitation issues. With all these significant advances, how to rethink the African city by putting sanitation at the heart of the territorial planning? How to arouse awareness of civil society actors and policies of African cities on the importance of taking action to build African cities where liquid and solid sanitation (waste management) is the basis for all strategic planning for the city of tomorrow? How to put in place specific mechanisms to accompany the anchoring of the sustainable development in African cities destine to increase the capacity of planning and environmental management of local communities on issues related to liquid and solid sanitation?

Talking about the problems of sanitation in African cities, also means to address the crucial issue of financing. Nowadays, the issue of sanitation requires an investment in equipment and infrastructures, regardless of the type of promoted remediation (autonomous versus collective) or management model adopted. However, in the face of all the problems facing African cities, sanitation services financing remains a problem. Resources currently allocated to the sector do not allow African cities to implement programs and projects to dispose of the equipment and infrastructure worthy of the name. In these conditions, how can sanitation service be finance in African cities?

It should be noted that, reflection anchoring on the question of sustainable city in Africa facing sanitation problems cannot evade at least in part the current stage of the development aid. But the development in the field of sanitation aid has been mainly oriented towards public hygiene and not both to the implementation of efficient sewer and facilitate the connection of households to the network. Rarely helped to develop skills in the technical management of the network. Rethink how aid and cooperation in the field of sanitation in order to promote a real transfer of technology on technical issues affecting sewer systems, connections, habitat, stations wastewater treatment plant?

The African sustainable city must also be an educational city. For this purpose, it is unthinkable to build a sustainable intercultural city in Africa without making an education for sustainable development. How to make education for sustainable development in African cities? What correlation can be made between the implementation of an approach of sustainable city in African cities and the implementation of a national and local approaches to formal, non-formal and informal education to sustainable development? How to make sanitation problems, objects of education to sustainable development in African cities? Finally what interaction between education for sustainable development and intercultural education in African cities?

Contributions should be primarily one of the following:
1.The experiences of Sustainable Cities in African Cities
2.Establishing a historical record and an inventory of research on sustainable cities in Africa
3. The plan of Local development and Agendas 21:
Similarities and contrasts
4. What african cities can learn from the fallout of Sustainable Cities Projects in Europe
5.Sustainable Cities and Intercultural Dialogue
6. Role and Issue of International Relations in Sustainable City
7.Diplomacy of Sustainable Cities:  territorial collectivity and international relations
8 Sustainable towns and Cooperation between African Cities
9.Cooperation between African cities in the field of sustainable cities in the domain of  solid and liquid sanitation
10. land issue in the establishment of a sustainable city in Africa
11.Sustainable city in Africa and adaptation to climate change
12.Problems of liquid and solid sanitation of African cities facing the challenges of sustainable development
13.The perspective  analysis of the problems of liquid and solid sanitation in African cities
14.Sustainable city and waste management
15.The action of NGOs in the field of sanitation in African cities
16.Education for sustainable development in African cities
17.Problems of Sanitation in African cities as a reflection area in education for sustainable development
18 Place and role of media in education for sustainable development on sanitation issues

Submission guidelines

Communication proposals that will be completed into articles are expected

before June 10, 2017.

The communication proposal will include the title of the communication, a summary in french or English (Times 12, between 400 and 500 words maximum), three keywords, and a short presentation of the author (name and first name (s), institution of attachment, email/email.... Contribution proposal (maximum one page) must be sent to the addresses: valerie.darjo@dicea.unipd.it, kutnjemdaouda@gmail.com, eric.kamgang@yahoo.fr.

The Organizing Committee supports the costs of travel and stay of 20 participant of African countries and 10 European participants whose contributions have been accepted and who submitted the first version of their article before July 10, 2017.

Calendar

• Deadline to send summary: June 10, 2017
• Final program of the Conference: June 20, 2017
• Date of the Symposium: 20 and July 21, 2017, Yaoundé, Cameroon

Coordinator

  • Pr Esoh Elamé – esoh.elame@dicea.unipd.it

Organizing Committee

  • Esoh Elame, University of Padua
  • Maria Cristina Lavagnolo, University of Padua
  • Nkeng Elambo George, ENSTP Cameroon
  • Valérie Darjo, University of Padua
  • Beatrice Pomaro, University of Padua
  • Daouda Kudjem, PhD student, Institute of Cameroon International Relations
  • Eric Kamgang, PhD student, Institute of Cameroon International Relations
  • Lynda Kalinda, PhD candidate, University of Bordeaux, France.

Scientific Committee

  • Carmelo Maiorana, Université de Padoue (Italie)
  • Maria Cristina Lavagnolo, Université de Padoue (Italie)
  • Nkeng Elambo George, ENSTP Yaoundé (Cameroun)
  • George Sawadogo, Université de Koudougou (Burkina Faso)
  • Jean Emmanuel Pondi, Université de Yaoundé 1 (Cameroun)
  • Pascal Charlemagne Messanga Nyamding, Université de Yaoundé 2 (Cameroun)
  • Laurent Charles Boyomo Assala, Université de Yaoundé 2 (Cameroun)
  • Jean Marc Lange, Université de Montpellier (France)
  • Didier Mulnet, Université de Clermont-Ferrand (France)
  • Véronique Solange Okome-Beka, ENS Libreville (Gabon)
  • Nadia Ursino, Université de Padoue (Italie)
  • Esoh Elamé, Université de Padoue (Italie)
  • Mondoué Roger, Insititut Panafricain pour le Développement (IPD)/Cameroun
  • Anne Marilyse Kouadio, Ecole Normale Supérieure d’Abidjan/Cote d’Ivoire
  • Annie Beka, ENS Libreville (Gabon)
  • Stéphane Ngwanza, Institut des Relations Internationales du Cameroun/université de Yaoundé 2
  • Stéphane M. Moandjo, IRIC /université de Yaoundé 2
  • Mireille Manga Edimo, IRIC/université de Yaoundé 2
  • Elimé Bouboama, ENSTP/Ecole Polytechnique – Yaoundé – Cameroun

Organizing institutions

  • Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Edile e ambientale – DICEA University of Padua (Italy)
  • National School of Public Works of Yaoundé - Cameroon 

Places

  • Ecole nationale supérieure des travaux publics (ENSTP) de Yaoundé
    Yaoundé, Cameroon

Date(s)

  • Saturday, June 10, 2017

Keywords

  • villes durable, dialogue interculturel, assainissement, eau, déchets, éducation au développement durable

Contact(s)

  • Esoh Elame
    courriel : esoh [dot] elame [at] dicea [dot] unipd [dot] it

Information source

  • Esoh Elame
    courriel : esoh [dot] elame [at] dicea [dot] unipd [dot] it

To cite this announcement

« Intercultural sustainable studies, cleaning up African cities and education in sustainable intercultural development », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Friday, May 19, 2017, http://calenda.org/405192