AccueilField philosophy and other experiments

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Publié le mardi 20 juin 2017 par Céline Guilleux

Résumé

This colloquium will bring together leading and emerging scholars to discuss, share, and analyze what similarities and differences there are between their respective humanities research projects, as conducted in the field, and to experiment with what new field practices might emerge from the humanities. How are field practices in the environmental humanities methodologically different from those in cultural anthropology, geography, or sociology? How might field research in philosophy reshape traditionally text-based disciplinary boundaries? 

Annonce

Argument

New interdisciplinary methodological practices have emerged within the environmental humanities over the last decade, and in particular there has been a noticeable movement within the humanities to experiment with field methodologies in order to critically address environmental concerns that cross more-than-disciplinary concepts, theories, narratives, and practices. By exploring relations with (and between) human communities, nonhuman animals, plants, fungi, forests, microbes, scientific practices, and more, environmental humanities scholars are breaking with traditional methodological practices and demonstrating that the compositions of their study subjects – e.g., extinction events, damaged landscapes, decolonization, climate change, conservation efforts – are always a confluence of entangled meanings, actors, and interests. The environmental humanities methodologies that are employed in the field draw from traditional disciplines (e.g., art, philosophy, literature, science and technology studies, indigenous studies, environmental studies, gender studies), but they are (i) importantly reshaping how environmental problems are being defined, analyzed, and acted on, and (ii) expanding and transforming traditional disciplinary frameworks to match their creative methodological practices.

Recent years have thus seen a rise in new methodologies in the broad area of the environmental humanities. “Field philosophy” has recently emerged as a means of engaging with concrete problems, not in an ad hoc manner of applying pre-established theories to a case study, but as an organic means of thinking and acting with others in order to better address the problem at hand. In this respect, field philosophy is an addition to other field methodologies that include etho-ethnology, multispecies ethnography and multispecies studies, philosophical ethology, more-than-human participatory research, extinction studies, and Anthropocene studies. All of them share similar starting points: beginning in the field, in the midst of a material problem or question, working with both experts and nonspecialists, and proceeding with genuine curiosity and openness in listening, observing, and exchanging stories, anecdotes, science fictions and speculative fabulations, all for the hope of a better common world.

This colloquium will bring together leading and emerging scholars to discuss, share, and analyze what similarities and differences there are between their respective humanities research projects, as conducted in the field, and to experiment with what new field practices might emerge from the humanities. How are field practices in the environmental humanities methodologically different from those in cultural anthropology, geography, or sociology? How might field research in philosophy reshape traditionally text-based disciplinary boundaries? The objective is not to aggregate all of the methodological approaches into one unified and universal theory, but rather to learn from and disseminate what practices and approaches have been particularly helpful in learning to live ethically with other creatures in our “compromised times.”

Programme  

Day 1: Friday, June 23, 2017

Venue: École normale supérieure

Amphi Rataud (45 rue, d’Ulm)

  • 9:00-9:15  Welcome Brett Buchanan, Laurentian University (Sudbury) Dominique Lestel, ENS (Paris)/JSPS (Tokyo)
  • 9:15-10:00 Dominique Lestel, ENS (Paris)/JSPS (Tokyo) “What Do Concepts Smell Like? The Challenge of Doing Field Philosophy”
  • 10:00-10:45  Vinciane Despret, Université de Liège (Liège)“Out of the Books: How Can Philosophers Do Fieldwork?”
  • 10:45-11:00  Break
  • 11:00-11:45 Michelle Bastian, University of Edinburgh (Edinburgh)“What’s a Philosopher Like You Doing Here?”
  • 11:45-12:30  Thibault De Meyer, Université de Liège (Liège) / Université libre de Bruxelles (Bruxelles)“How to Study Perspectivism? A Comparison Between Philosophy and Etho-ethnology”

12:30-13:45  Déjeuner

  • 13:45-14:30  Brett Buchanan, Laurentian University (Sudbury)“Are We Out of the Woods Yet? Performing Field Philosophy in a Remediated Landscape”
  • 14:30-15:15  Hugo Reinert, University of Oslo (Oslo)“The Haunting Cliffs: Entangled Absence in a Silenced Landscape”
  • 15:15-16:00 Thom van Dooren, University of New South Wales (Sydney), “Provisioning Crows: Ecologies of Hope in the Mariana Islands”
  • 16:00-16:45  Ségolène Guinard, Université de Paris 8 (Paris)“Of Space Gardeners and Space Gardens”

16:45-17:00  Break

17:00-18:00  Panel Discussion: What is at Stake in Field Philosophy?

Featuring: Isabelle Stengers, Université de Bruxelles (Bruxelles)

  • Vinciane Despret, Université de Liège (Liège)
  • Thom van Dooren, University of New South Wales (Sydney)

18:30-22:00  Dîner (Restaurant TBD)

Day 2: Saturday, June 24, 2017

Venue: École normale supérieure

Amphi Rataud (45 rue, d’Ulm)

  • 9:15-10:00    Anna-Katharina Laboissière, ENS (Paris)/Curtin University (Perth)“The Trouble with Lethal Entanglements”
  • 10:00-10:45  Matthew Chrulew, Curtin University (Perth)“My Place, My Duty: Zoo Biology as Field Philosophy in the Work of Heini Hediger”

10:45-11:00  Break

  • 11:00-11:45  Perig Pitrou, CNRS (Paris)“The Contribution of Anthropology of Life to Environmental Humanities”
  • 11:45-12:30  Isabelle Stengers, Université libre de Bruxelles (Bruxelles) “Sapere Aude: Dare to Taste”

12:30-14:00  Déjeuner

  • 14:00-14:45  Maan Barua, Oxford University (Oxford)“Tracking Animals’s Geographies: Space, Ontology, Method”
  • 14:45-15:30  Nicolas Lainé, Collège de France (Paris)“Multispecies Labour in the Anthropocene”

15:30-15:45  Break

  • 15:45-16:30  Jeffrey Bussolini, City University of New York (New York)“Feline Artmaking and Ethology: Gesture, Expression, Intention, Order, Disorder”
  • 16:30-17:30  Jérémie Brugidou, Université de Paris 8 (Paris)“Film: Poacher’s Moon”
  • 17:30 Thank you! Close of colloquium

18:00 Departing festivities (TBD)

Lieux

  • ENS, Amphi Rataud - 45 rue d'Ulm
    Paris, France (75005)

Dates

  • vendredi 23 juin 2017
  • samedi 24 juin 2017

Mots-clés

  • field philosophy, environmental humanities, ethology, ethnography, multispecies studies

Contacts

  • Brett Buchanan
    courriel : bbuchanan [at] laurentian [dot] ca

Source de l'information

  • Brett Buchanan
    courriel : bbuchanan [at] laurentian [dot] ca

Pour citer cette annonce

« Field philosophy and other experiments », Colloque, Calenda, Publié le mardi 20 juin 2017, http://calenda.org/409429