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  • Poitiers

    Call for papers - Middle Ages

    Categorising the Church (II)

    Clerical and monastic communities in the Carolingian World (8th-10th)

    The Carolingian era has seen by many as a time when the Church became increasingly institutionalised. One of the main aspects of this development, exemplified by the series of councils held between 816 and 819, was a (re)definition of the canonical and monastic orders and the requirement for each community in the realm to comply either with the institutiones canonicorum and sanctimonialium or with the Rule of Benedict. Despite the influential works of J. Semmler or R. Schieffer, however, the real impact of these proposed reforms is still an open question, and from this perspective, the very notion of institutionalisation can also be questioned.

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  • Madrid | Alcalá de Henares | Pozuelo de Alarcón

    Call for papers - Modern

    Myth and Audiovisual Creation

    V International Conference on Mythcriticism

    The V International Conference on Mythcriticism “Myth and Audiovisual Creation” will analyze the impact of myth in audiovisual creation from 1900 to the present day. The Conference will be organized in four universities during two weeks.The Conference will be divided into 4 venues according to different themes: "Germanic Myths" in the University of Alcalá, "Classical Myths" in the University Autónoma, "Biblical Myths" in the University Francisco de Vitoria and "Modern Myths" in the University Complutense. Researchers can send to one of their 4 venues their abstracts. They will have to analyze the relevance of film, TV series and video games in the creation and modification of old, medieval and modern myths to our contemporary world.

     

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  • Leuven

    Call for papers - History

    Missionaries, Modernity and Education

    MiMoRA I

    This research academy will study the theme of christian missionaries, Modernity and education and take place from 13 to 21 September 2018. MiMoRA I will consist of a series of workshops, a methodological session, seminars with keynotes, consultation of Leuven collections (missionary archives and publications at KADOC-KU Leuven and the missionary collections of the Maurits Sabbe Library), and visits to missionary heritage. 

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  • Sibiu

    Call for papers - Modern

    Instances of power and cultural discourse

    Intercultural exchange in the age of globalization, second edition

    In the context of today’s social, political and economic changes, power is one of the governing principles of culture. Power comes in many shapes and sizes and it manifests itself under various forms: it can be tyrannical or a combination of forces (Foucault); it can be charismatic, traditional and rational (Weber) or the opposite – manipulative; it can also appear as a system of diluted forces that spring from the “social field” (Bourdieu); it can remain in the unconscious or it can manifest itself in the speech act. However it may appear, it has become clear that power shapes the course of the creation, interpretation and analysis of literary texts and other cultural products.

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  • Rome

    Call for papers - Religion

    The effects of World War I on the christian churches

    11 November 1918 saw the end of the First World War, known at the time as the “Great War” (1914-1918) for its global scale, extreme destructivity and unseen casualty rates. On the one hand, wars evoke heroism and patriotism and bring people and groups to alter their mental boundaries and abilities. On the other hand, wars also elicit hatred, envy and violent behaviour, the settling of hidden accounts, the abandonment of ethical standards, and deep divisions and confrontations between families and societies. Since effects of the first world conflict were enormous and the shock waves were felt for years and generations to come, the question arises about the impact of the Great War on religion and the established churches.

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  • Berne

    Call for papers - Religion

    “Contemporary spiritualities” and “New Age”

    Ethnographic and historical-comparative approaches to a transnational field

    While the first theorists of secularization foresaw the gradual disappearance of religion from the public sphere, others observed a reorganization or even a “return of the sacred” on a worldwide scale. Aside from fundamentalisms which strongly uphold the idea of “tradition” and strengthen borders, new forms of religious expression have appeared transnationally, most often deinstitutionalized and integrated in civil society: for example, the “new religious movements”, and especially the more diffused and nebulous networks, groups and movements known under the generic terms of “New Age” and “contemporary spiritualities”.This session seeks to explore these new forms of transnational religiosity expressed through the notions of “spiritualities” and “New Age” from the perspectives of ethnography and the comparative social history of religion.

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  • Barcelona

    Call for papers - Middle Ages

    Medieval Women and the Arts

    Literacy, Education, and Visual Culture

    This event is conceived as a place of discussion and exchange for scholars, researchers, and postgraduate students who consecrate their work to the field of social, cultural, and intellectual history of women.

     

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  • Budapest

    Call for papers - Religion

    The Sacred in Conflict

    Disagreements between and within Religions

    Disagreements arise between different religions, but can also erupt within various branches of the same faith, and the dissociation of external and internal adversaries often appears linked. Religiously motivated confrontation has continuously shaped people’s ideological landscapes and everyday realities, often causing deeply rooted conflicts, violent clashes, and ferocious infighting, which can persist throughout centuries. Which motivations inform the justification for religious beliefs of individuals and groups? What manner of duties do believers assume in the face of impending conflicts? What justifies religious institutions? What is the role of the orthodox-heterodox binary in inter- and intra-confessional disagreements?

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  • Bologna

    Call for papers - Religion

    Litany in the Arts and Culture

    The litany derives from ancient religious rites. Throughout the ages, however, it spread across many countries and became much more than a mere form of prayer. As has been demonstrated by our recent studies on the litanic forms in European poetry it is possible to reconstruct a cultural and literary map of European regions that traces the level of their participation in and contribution to the litanic tradition. The litanic verse is marked by religious semantics, but it also bears the mark of inter-European divisions, such as those experienced between and within various denominations, countries and nations, as well as the original folk cultures. Therefore, the litany may be of interest to scholars specializing in areas such the emergence of national identities and religious minorities, the crossover between art and religion as well as between music and poetry, the history of liturgy and spiritual life, the cultural exchanges between various nations.

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  • Milan

    Call for papers - Language

    Hermeneutics of symbol, myth and “modernity of Antiquity” in Italian Literature and the Arts from the Renaissance up to the present day

    The hermeneutics of the “modernity of antiquity” is a still pioneering branch of research in Italian literature and art studies. Its aim is to discover the hidden meaning of works of literature and arts where other approaches failed or proved unsatisfactory.

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  • Washington

    Colloquium - History

    The Franciscans in Mexico

    Five Centuries of Cultural Influence

    Generations of scholars have studied the multi-faceted experiences of the Franciscans in Mexico and the ways in which the Franciscan order shaped New Spain and the early Mexican republic. This conference examines the range of Franciscan influence and analyzes new scholarship that focuses on the multiple discourses with which friars engaged native peoples, creole populations, the vice-regal authorities, and other actors throughout the Spanish empire.  The conference brings together junior and senior scholars to study the long Franciscan experience in Mexico on the eve of the commemoration of the quincentenary of the Spanish — and thus the Franciscan— presence in Mexico.

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  • Halle

    Call for papers - History

    Connected histories? Expectations of the last days in Islam, Judaism and Christianity from the 15th to the 17th centuries

    The aim of the conference is to check to what extent we can write a connected history of messianism and apocalyptics in the monotheistic religions from the 15th to the 17th centuries. The conference is conceived as a framework for discussing hypotheses and exploring possible connections between Islamic, Jewish and Christian believes about the Last Days.

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  • Dublin

    Call for papers - Middle Ages

    The Waldensians in the Medieval and Early Modern context

    The Waldensians in the Medieval and Early Modern European context is an interdisciplinary conference to be held in Trinity College Dublin on February 9-10, 2018, and hosted by the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

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  • Poitiers

    Colloquium - History

    Urban monasticism: 300-1300

    Christianity emerged as an urban phenomenon, yet monasticism is more often than not presented as an escape from the sinful town into the wilderness, and as more concerned with the soul than with the body. Ascetics, however, have always had a vested interest in the city, and not only symbolically. Monasticism has been an important urban presence since Late Antiquity up to the Late Middle Ages, even if they were sometimes in competition with newer religious orders.

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  • Paris

    Study days - Thought

    The Invention of Sin

    The Greek word for a fault or error is hamartia; this same word, when it appears in Greek translations of the Hebrew Bible and in the New Testament, is commonly rendered as “sin.”  If there were no word like sin or péché or Sünde or peccato in modern languages, with the religious connotation these terms have acquired, could we identify a special sense of hamartia (or the Latin peccatum) in the Bible on the basis of context alone?  This colloquium will address the question of when and how error and wrongdoing acquired the specific sense of sin commonly associated with the Judaeo-Christian tradition – if indeed there was a change.  Under examination will be attitudes toward wrongdoing in ancient cults, ideas of pollution, conceptions of God or gods, and more.

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  • Rome

    Call for papers - History

    The Saints of Rome

    Diffusion and reception from Late Antiquity to the Early Modern Period

    The saints of Rome have always been among the most venerated and the most popular heavenly patrons in Christendom, grafting the noble air of universality and integration onto emerging Christian cultures. From the apostles and Early Christian martyrs through the Early Modern period and beyond, the textual and material  dissemination of Roman saints made a significant impact on the rise of the cult of the saints. Post-Tridentine Roman cults spread by the Society of Jesus and  the revival of catacomb cults  brought a new  wave in the world-wide  cult of the saints of Rome in the early modern period.

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  • Madrid

    Call for papers - Europe

    Sensorium : Sensory Perceptions in Roman Polytheism

    The Institute of Historiography “Julio Caro Baroja”, at the University of Carlos III of Madrid, is organizing an international conference titled, “Sensorium: Sensory Perceptions in the Roman Religion”. Researchers of ancient history, religious history, archeology, anthropology, classical literature, and other related disciplines, are invited to present their research relating to the poly-sensorial practice of religion in the Roman world.

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  • Leuven

    Call for papers - History

    Territories of faith

    Religion, urban planning and demographic change in Post-War Europe, 1945-1975

    The research group “Architectural cultures of the recent past” (ARP) of KU Leuven and KADOC, the Documentation and Research Centre on Religion, Culture and Society of KU Leuven, are organizing an international workshop on religion, urban planning and demographic change in post-war Europe as a prelude to an edited volume on this topic, to be published by an international academic press.

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  • Call for papers - History

    Neo-Thomism in Action

    Law and Society reshaped by Neo-Scholastic Philosophy, 1880-1960

    This workshop aims to provide an opportunity for an explicitly international audience of scholars to reflect on the societal impact of Neo-Thomism, especially in the domains of law and socio-economic thinking. This is a topic deserving a multifaceted and in-depth analysis, using a broad, international comparative perspective and combining the results of very different fields of historical research: history of science, church and religion, social and political history, etc.

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  • Vienna

    Colloquium - History

    Monastic journeys from Late Antiquity to the Middle Ages

    Religious aspirations, political goals and economic concerns

    This conference is the result of a cooperation between the Wittgenstein-Prize Project ‘Mobility, Microstructes and Personal Agency’ of the FWF (Austrian National Research Foundation), acting as the local host, and the Laboratoire d’Excellence RESMED (Religions et sociétés dans le monde méditerranéen, University of Paris-Sorbonne), the Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS, UMR 8167, Paris), as well as the Institut français d’archéologie orientale (IFAO, Cairo), the École française de Rome (EfR) and the University of Nantes (CRHIA), who have organized the previous two conferences in this series in Rome.

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