HomeMerchant, Ecclesiastical and Urban experiences for the uprising of princely accounting

Merchant, Ecclesiastical and Urban experiences for the uprising of princely accounting

Les expériences marchandes, ecclésiastiques et urbaines dans l’élaboration des comptabilités princières

Die kaufmännischen, kirchlichen und städtischen Erfahrungen in der Entwicklung der herrschaftlichen Buchhaltung

Provence, Comté Venaissin, Dauphiné, Savoy, and others territories of Occident (12th - 15th Century)

Provence, Comté de Venaissin, Dauphiné, Savoie, et autres principautés d’Occident (XIIe-XVe siècle)

Provence, Comté Venaissin, Dauphiné, Savoyen und andere abendländische Territorien (12.-15. Jahrhundert)

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Published on Wednesday, November 28, 2012 by Elsa Zotian

Summary

The advent of monarchic accounting during the Thirteenth Century requires two types of reflection. The first one deals with the personnel mobilized by the monarch, its background, training and professional and family culture. The second one is more of an inquiry into the writing methods, the conservation and consultation processes used by the institutions in charge of princely accounting, especially the Camere rationum (accounting offices).

Announcement

Argument

The advent of monarchic accounting during the Thirteenth Century requires two types of reflection. The first one deals with the personnel mobilized by the monarch, its background, training and professional and family culture. The second one is more of an inquiry into the writing methods, the conservation and consultation processes used by the institutions in charge of princely accounting, especially the Camere rationum (accounting offices).

For both subjects, studies have focused on the various influences at work, especially from the urban areas, merchants, notaries, lawyers and communal institutions. In the case of the Angevin county of Provence for instance, the likelihood of the addition of personnel from the Italian peninsula was noted from Piedmont, Lombardy, Tuscany, Liguria, especially during visits by podestà and their courts following transformations of communal governments. The relations between monarchic accounting and these milieux as well as urban accountings were probably close, although the modalities and their chronology should be clarified and the institutional vocabulary and the structure of written accounting carefully studied. Secondly, the use of a foreign workforce by princely governments brought about specific prosopographic inquiries, although the connection between the formers’ skills and the elaboration of accounting methods should be examined. This peripatetic skilled workforce requires a specific study beyond the scale of a single territorial principality.

The significance of the ecclesiastical matrix in this elaboration process seems a relatively new area of study, in spite of the new perspectives that works on the late Middle-Age have offered, which would modify if not complete the abovementioned secular hypothesis. The investigation should first address the presence of accounting and the needs for it within the ecclesiastical structures and the religious communities for whom intellectual training included calculus and computus. Within ecclesiastical milieus, who had themselves an urban background, such as the cathedral chapters, the implementation in the course of the Thirteenth Century of accounting instruments aimed at improving memory and tributes paid to the dead as in necrologies, obituaries and anniversary books deserves special attention. Moreover, the development of papal taxation, through the decima, forced the bishops and the cathedral chapters, its intermediaries at the local level, to set up an accounting pertaining to prebends and to rationalize administrative tasks, which we should examine closely. What were thus its consequences on the emergence of specific competencies within this clerical milieu? The function of the secular clerks in the early monarchic accounting institutions, and of notaries and scribes from their entourage, the presence of numerous collaborators of the prince into this milieu, should finally prompt an historical and social investigation of the accounting institution. It will probably create new perspectives for understanding the elaboration of accounting methods, and for the link they continue to have with some of their origins. There are important ideological issues at stake, for this new type of accounting was first implemented as an auxiliary to economy of salvation.

Submission guidelines

Deadline : 31 janvier 2013

Proposals : cv (1500 signs) + abstract (1500 signs)

To : thierry.pecout@univ-st-etienne.fr

Conference's dates : 13 and 14 of June 2013

Scientific committee

  • Jean-Paul Boyer, université d’Aix-Marseille
  • Jean-Luc Bonnaud, université de Moncton
  • Noël Coulet, université d’Aix-Marseille
  • Laurent Feller, université de Paris I
  • Olivier Guyotjeannin, Ecole nationale des Chartes
  • Michel Hébert, université du Québec à Montréal
  • Thierry Pécout, université de St-Etienne
  • Jean-Loup Lemaitre, Ecole pratique des hautes études
  • Olivier Mattéoni, université de Paris I
  • Albert Rigaudière, université de Paris II et Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres

Places

  • salle Georges Duby - Maison méditerranéenne des sciences de l'Homme, 5 rue du Château de l'Horloge
    Aix-en-Provence, France (13090)

Date(s)

  • Thursday, January 31, 2013

Keywords

  • comptabilité, État, Église, ville, marchand, livre de comptes, clergé séculier, clergé régulier, principauté, gouvernement, administration, gestion, calcul

Contact(s)

  • Thierry Pécout
    courriel : federationhistorique [dot] deprovence [at] laposte [dot] net

Information source

  • Thierry Pécout
    courriel : federationhistorique [dot] deprovence [at] laposte [dot] net

To cite this announcement

« Merchant, Ecclesiastical and Urban experiences for the uprising of princely accounting », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Wednesday, November 28, 2012, https://calenda.org/229263

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