HomeEconomic Elites in Developing Countries

Economic Elites in Developing Countries

Les élites économiques dans les pays du Sud

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Published on Thursday, November 13, 2014 by Elsa Zotian

Summary

Academic debates on economic elites in “developed” countries are abundant. These theoretical or empirical works study, amongst others, the surge of a transnational capitalist class or the relevance of local dynamics in understanding elite behavior and selection. For their part, studies assessing elites in developing countries tend to uphold the notion that a dominant class exists and that it is able to consolidate its domination by colluding with political strongmen allied to the State and that often, this domination is maintained through a monopoly of the relations with the international economy. However, the political upheavals that recently affected countries in the Arab world as well as those that took place in Latin America in the 1990s, as well as in Eastern Europe and in South-East Asia, call such one-dimensional analyses into question. As this proposal brings to sight, more than a decade ago the combined accumulation of old and new processes led to the emergence, circulation or transformation of existing reproduction modalities in developing countries. Unsurprisingly, these changes caused socio-political disruptions that in turn triggered the renewal of career paths to elite positions, alongside new modalities of international education and State/business collusion mechanisms. We invite applicants to join us in studying these structural yet paradoxical dynamics in order to contribute to a critical understanding of economic elites in different contexts. This workshop is mainly open to empirical research dealing with the analysis of economic elites in developing countries, their resistance to transformations of the international order and, of course, their adaptation to the disruptions of the last twenty years.

Announcement

Argument

Academic debates on economic elites in “developed” countries are abundant. These theoretical or empirical works study, amongst others, the surge of a transnational capitalist class or the relevance of local dynamics in understanding elite behavior and selection. For their part, studies assessing elites in developing countries tend to uphold the notion that a dominant class exists and that it is able to consolidate its domination by colluding with political strongmen allied to the State and that often, this domination is maintained through a monopoly of the relations with the international economy.

However, the political upheavals that recently affected countries in the Arab world as well as those that took place in Latin America in the 1990s, as well as in Eastern Europe and in South-East Asia, call such one-dimensional analyses into question. As this proposal brings to sight, more than a decade ago the combined accumulation of old and new processes led to the emergence, circulation or transformation of existing reproduction modalities in developing countries. Unsurprisingly, these changes caused socio-political disruptions that in turn triggered the renewal of career paths to elite positions, alongside new modalities of international education and State/business collusion mechanisms.

We invite applicants to join us in studying these structural yet paradoxical dynamics in order to contribute to a critical understanding of economic elites in different contexts. This workshop is mainly open to empirical research dealing with the analysis of economic elites in developing countries, their resistance to transformations of the international order and, of course, their adaptation to the disruptions of the last twenty years.

Contribution can fall in the scope of classical paradigms (Bourdieusian approaches, neo-institutionalism, structuralism, Marxism, etc.) or propose new theoretical approaches. We are particularly interested in studies using social network analysis, but a variety of methodological qualitative and quantitative approaches will be accepted. Nonetheless, all contributions must be based on empirical data of a developing country (geographically: Latin-America, Africa, South-East Asia, Eastern Europe) or on a comparison between two or more countries. Relational data is increasingly available in developing countries enabling researches on interlocking directorates as in post-socialist Hungary or to gauge more precisely the logics behind crony capitalism as demonstrated in post-revolutionary Tunisia.

Submission guidelines

15 November 20104 (submission of summaries – 3 pages maximum: elitesworkshop@gmail.com)

15 December 2014 (papers accepted, either in English or in French: elitesworkshop@gmail.com)

Presentation and discussion format: a discussant is appointed to each article and will reflect on it for 15 minutes, then all participants (all articles must be read by everyone) join for 30 minutes. Finally, the author finishes by giving a general response to the discussant and participants for 15 minutes.

Output and Perspectives: Publication of a special issue in a scientific journal and/or of an edited book on the subject.

Scientific Committee

Scientific Committee for the evaluation of submitted proposals: 

  • Myriam Catusse (research fellow, CNRS-IREMAM),
  • François-Xavier Dudouet (research fellow, CNRS-IRISSO, Université Paris-Dauphine),
  • Beatrice Hibou (senior research fellow, CNRS-CERI Sciences Po),
  • Jerôme Sgard (professor, CERI-Sciences Po),
  • Antoine Vion (senior lecturer, Université de la Méditerranée-LEST).

Pratical informations 

  • Date: Friday, January 30th, 2015
  • Venue: Centre d’Etudes et de Recherches Internationales (CERI-Sciences Po), 56 rue Jacob, 75006 Paris
  • Organizers: Mohamed Oubenal (postdoctoral fellow, Institut des Sciences de la Communication, CNRS-ISCC) and Eduardo Rios (PhD candidate, CERI-Sciences Po)
  • Partners: CERI-Sciences Po, Group 42 “Elites Sociology” and Group 26 “Social Networks” of the French Association of Sociology.

Places

  • Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches Internationales (CERI) de Sciences Po, salle de conférences - 56, rue Jacob
    Paris, France (75006)

Date(s)

  • Saturday, November 15, 2014

Keywords

  • élites, pays du Sud, émergence, reproduction, elites, emergence, developing countries, reproduction

Contact(s)

  • Eduardo Rios
    courriel : elitesworkshop [at] gmail [dot] com

Reference Urls

Information source

  • Eduardo Rios
    courriel : elitesworkshop [at] gmail [dot] com

To cite this announcement

« Economic Elites in Developing Countries », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Thursday, November 13, 2014, https://calenda.org/305447

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