Calenda - The calendar for arts, humanities and social sciences

Sustainable Development of Vulnerable Territories

Développement durable des territoires vulnérables

Desarrollo sostenible de los territorios vulnerables

14th Annual International Conference of Territorial Intelligence

XIVa conferencia anual internacional de inteligencia territorial

XIVe conference internationale annuelle d'intelligence territoriale

*  *  *

Published on Wednesday, April 22, 2015 by Céline Guilleux

Summary

The 14th Annual International Conference of Territorial Intelligence in Ouarzazate (Morocco) will focus on "Sustainable Development of Vulnerable Territories". Papers will be divided into five topics: Socio-ecological transition and vulnerable territories resiliency; Observation of vulnerable territories; The valorization of vulnerable territories; The quality of territories; Initiatives in vulnerable territories.

La XIVe conférence internationale annuelle d’intelligence territoriale de Ouarzazate (Maroc) portera sur le « Developpement durable des territoires vulnérables ». Les communications se répartiront entre cinq thématiques : transition socio-écologique et résilience des territoires vulnérables ; observation des territoires vulnérables ; la valorisation des territoires vulnérables ; la qualité des territoires ; initiatives dans les territoires vulnérables.

La XIVª Conferencia Anual Internacional de Inteligencia Territorial en Ouarzazate (Marruecos) se centrará en « Desarrollo Sostenible de Territorios Vulnerables ». Los trabajos se dividirán en cinco temas: socio-ecológica de transición y territorios vulnerables resiliencia ; observación de los territorios vulnerables ; la valorización de los territorios vulnerables ;la calidad de los territorios ; iniciativas en territorios vulnerables.

Announcement

Argument

The 14th Annual International Conference of Territorial Intelligence in Ouarzazate (Morocco) will focus on "Sustainable Devolopment of Vulnerable Territories."

Papers will be divided into five topics:

  1. Socio-ecological transition and vulnerable territories resiliency
  2. Observation of vulnerable territories
  3. The valorization of vulnerable territories
  4. The quality of territories
  5. Initiatives in vulnerable territories

Mankind has realized that the system based on the accumulation of material goods spurred by competition in the context of globalization and financialization leads to unsustainable inequalities between men and local communities, product depletion resources on a global scale with an uneven impact in different territories, and increases the environmental risks that challenge the very existence of the human species.

Territorial Intelligence, "action research project whose object is sustainable development of the territories and the subjects of which are local communities" (Girardot, 2008, 2013) wants to establish the prospect of another development model oriented by improving the well-being of each and every (Council of Europe, 2005), democratically developed by each local community. It suggests a process of co-construction of a collective intelligence that links the actors of a territory within the territorial community, to develop concerted sustainable local project and realize cooperative, transparent, efficient and equitable way. The participation of the territorial community, and each person, targets the improvement of the quality of life of each and everyone.

To do this, territorial intelligence embraces the concept of socio-ecological transition that seeks to harness the demographic, economic, social, and environmental challenges and reversing the increase in social and territorial inequalities (Baer, 2009). Territorial intelligence focuses on changes in social behavior, but also the individual who will, if they are stimulated by structural reforms and adequate governance, reduce fossil resources consumption and reduce social and territorial inequalities. 

Local communities are encouraged to reclaim their territories to improve resiliency by promoting initiatives that have been marginalized by the financialization of the economy.

Territorial intelligence contributes through a multidisciplinary at scientific level and multisectoral in action approach to the balanced combination of economic efficiency, social equity and environmental protection. as such, it differs from business intelligence that is limited pursuing a competitive advantage, a monetary gain, on the global competitive market. Territorial intelligence does not confuse the territory with a market, or a business, nor citizens with clients or employees. She is not only concerned about economic competitiveness.

Territorial resiliency is one of the key concepts of socio-ecological transition, popularized by Rob Hopkins in "Transition Handbook" (2008). Resilience is inspired by the design of Hollings (1973) that after a perturbation the system is not marked by a return to equilibrium, expression of mechanical behavior, but instead often reacts positively , creative, thanks to multiple adjustments. To the extent that "The concept of transition evokes the opportunity to co-construct a rational evolution, peaceful and transparent, but radical, against the risk of an authoritarian change" (Girardot, 2012) "The resiliency of a territory described the ability of its community to assume its peaceful transition from a development based on the criteria of short term selfish gain towards sustainable development, reconciling economic, social, environmental and cultural aims face external shocks that increase its vulnerability and calls into question its existence "(Girardot, 2013).

We propose to continue, in the specific case of vulnerable areas, the discussions initiated during international meeting of Roscoff (May 2014): How to develop a transition agenda and an integrated analysis of the resiliency of territories, highlighting the risks and opportunities? What are the milestones of the transition agenda and indicators of resiliency? How do they articulate with the territorial governance arrangements and especially with a lateral participatory governance.

Observation of vulnerable territories

In a logic of territorial intelligence, territorial observation is based on the collection, sharing and crossing data on users and services with territorial indicators to develop and argue partnership projects, to manage and evaluate them in a participatory way.


At the local level it faces five major challenges:


  • The most important is the lack of open  information available at the sub municipal level.

  • Paradoxically we may be faced with a mass of information on smaller scales.
  • Next is little social and environmental indicators consistent with sustainable development.

  • Disparities between sectors, spatial divisions and updating data in time, complicate the mapping.

  • Local information still lacks transparency.


These difficulties are a priori more important in vulnerable areas. What forms do they take then? How about it?

Territorial valorization

Territorial valorization has a more ambitious objective than economic competitiveness. It refers to the concept of collective intelligence evaluating "results from the collaboration and sharing of information, as well as the competition between many individuals ... Collective intelligence can be considered as a form of network, enabled by recent developments in information technology "(Prior, 2010).

Territorial development is not limited to economic growth, or economic competition. The economic logic of the partnership, instrument of the global approach, is based primarily on cooperation (including within clusters) and aims to bring together local resources before resorting to other means. Networks allow private actors, associations and individuals, such as the public, to participate in decisions in the context of participatory democracy. From a territorial valorization perspective, participatory democracy is a space for competition as well as cooperation.

Quality of the territory

The quality of the territory is a complementary concept of territorial valorization. Quality has been understood as the ability of a product or service to satisfy the expressed or latent needs of consumers. They are the intrinsic attributes of the product or service. Customer satisfaction and continuous improvement of the product or service have been central to this specific understanding. Within a territorial framework, however, quality has a broader meaning by virtue of which territorial community replaces consumers and dimensions of sustainability replace product or service attributes. Therefore, we can define the quality of the territory as the ability of the latter to meet the needs of its community through continuous improvement of its economic, social, environmental and cultural dimensions. It is often equated with quality of life, a concept born as a result of changes in lifestyles of today's society and the perception of risks arising from economic development.

Initiatives in vulnerable territories

Regardless of international and national programs, sustainable development is characterized by local initiatives taken by local authorities, associations, informal groups or individuals.

We are interested in those that are part of the socio-ecological transition, contribute to the territorial resiliency, value territory and illustrate its quality.

Submission guidelines

Paper proposals should include

In the form of an abstract of 400 words in English or French, indicating at the beginning:

  • The title,
  • The author and professional contact information,
  • The proposed form: presentation, poster or demonstration,
  • The topic in question: A, B, ...

Proposals for papers should be sent by email to: m.oudada@uiz.ac.ma with copy to jjg@mshe.univ-fcomte.fr


by May 20th.

Paper proposals will be evaluated in a double blind.

Scientific Committee

  • Jean-Jacques Girardot, assistant professor of economy,  MSHE USR 3124 CNRS/UFC/UTBM, ThéMA UMR 6049 CNRS/UFC/UB, Université de Franche-Comté, France.
Scientific coordinator of International Network of Territorial Intelligence.
  • Mohamed Oudada, professor of geography, Faculté Polyidisciplinaire de Ouarzazate, Université Ibn Zohr d’Agadir Morocco.  Coordinator of ESEAD
  • Cyril Masselot, assistant professor of information and communication science, MSHE USR 3124 CNRS/UFC/UTBM, CIMEOS EA 4177-UB, Université de Franche-Comté, France. .
  • Serge Ormaux, full professor of geography, ThéMA UMR 6049 CNRS/UFC/UB, Université de Franche-Comté, France.
  • Philippe Woloszyn, researcher, Laboratoire "Espaces et Sociétés" (ESO), UMR 6590 CNRS/URENNES2, Université de Rennes 2, France.
  • Giovanna Truda, professor of sociology, Université de Salerno, Italy.
  • Blanca Miedes Ugarte, assistant professor of economy, C3IT, OLE Observatorio local de Empleo, Universidad de Huelva, Spain.
  • Guénaël Devillet, assistant professor of geography, SEGEFA Service d’Étude en Géographie Économique Fondamentale et Appliquée ULG/FNRS, Université de Liège, Belgique.
  • Natale Ammaturo, full professeur of sociology, DISUFF Dipartimento di Scienze Umane, Filosofiche e della Formazione, Université de Salerno, Italy.
  • Horacio Bozzano, full professeur of geography, Equipo TAG Territorio Actores Gobernanza UNLP/CONICET, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina.
  • Raul Montenegro, full professeur of evolutive biology, Alternative Nobel Price  2004 (Stockholm), Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina .
  • Nanta Novello Paglianti, assistant professor of information and communication science, MSHE USR 3124 CNRS/UFC/UTBM, CIMEOS EA 4177-UB, Université de Franche-Comté, France .
  • Sylvie Damy, assistant professor of computer science, UMR Chrono-environnement  6249 CNRS/UFC,  Université de Franche-Comté,  France.
  • Bénédicte Herrmann, assistant professor of computer science, Laboratoire Femto-ST UMR 7174 CNRS/UFC/ENSMM, Université de Franche-Comté, France,
  • Marc Cote, emeritus professor of geography, Université de Provence, Aix-en-Provence, France.
  • Mohamed Ait Hamza, full professor of geography, Université Mohamed V, Rabat, Morocco.
  • Brahim Akdim, full professor of geography, Université Sidi Mohammed Ben Abdellah, Fès, Morocco.
  • Mohamed Daoud, full professor of geography,  Université Chouaib Doukkali, Eljadida, Morocco.
  • Mohamed Benattou, full professor of geography, Université Ibn Zohr, Agadir, Morocco.
  • El Madani Mountasser, full professor of geography, Université Ibn Zohr, Agadir, Morocco.
  • Abdelhadi Bounar, full professor of geography, Université Ibn Zohr, Agadir, Morocco.
  • Lakbir Ouhajou, full professor of geography, Université Ibn Zohr, Agadir, Morocco.
  • Hassan Benhalima full professor of geography, Université Ibn Zohr, Agadir, Morocco.
  • Elhassane Elmahdad, full professor of geography, Université Ibn Zohr, Agadir, Morocco.
  • Ahmed Belkadi, full professor of geography, Université Ibn Zohr, Agadir, Morocco.
  • Otman Ait Ouarasse, professor of english language, Faculté Pluridisciplinaire de Ouarzazate, Université Ibn Zohr, Agadir, Morocco.

Provisional program

Mercredi 21 octobre 2015

Morning:

08h30-09h00: Participants Welcome

09h00-10h00: Welcome speeches

10h15-12h15: Opening communications

12h30: lunch

Afternoon:

  • 14h00-15h45: Communications thematic workshops
  • 16h00-17h45: Communications thematic workshops

Jeudi 22 octobre 2015

Matin:

  • 08h30-10h15:  Communications thematic workshops
  • 10h30-12h15:  Communications thematic workshops

12h30 Repas – lunch

Afternoon :

  • 14h00-15h45:  Communications thematic workshops
  • 16h00-17h30: Summary of thematic workshops
  • 17h30-18h00:  Closing of the conference

16h30: Conference end.

Schedule

  • April 30: Registering
  • May 20: Deadline for proposals
  • June 30: Deadline for evaluation
  • July 30: Return of full articles.
  • Sept. 20 : Publication of full articles.

Registration and indicative price

  • Registration: 1650 dirhams (150 euros)
  • Single room with half board (breakfast included): 60 euros per night. (payable in Ouarzazate)
  • Flight from Paris to Ouarzazate Royal Air Morocco : 350 euros (depending on dates)

Argumentaire

La 14e Conférence Internationale Annuelle d’Intelligence Territoriale de Ouarzazate (Maroc) portera sur le «Developpement durable des territoires vulnérables».

Les communications se répartiront entre cinq thématiques :

  1. Transition socio-écologique et résilience des territoires vulnérables
  2. Observation des territoires vulnérables
  3. La valorisation des territoires vulnérables
  4. La qualité des territoires
  5. Initiatives dans les territoires vulnérables

L’humanité a pris conscience que le système basé sur l’accumulation des biens matériels aiguillonnée par la concurrence dans le contexte de la globalisation et de la financiarisation, conduit à des inégalités insoutenables entre les hommes et les communautés territoriales, produit l’épuisement des ressources à l'échelle planétaire avec un impact inégal selon les territoires, et accroit les risques environnementaux qui remettent en cause l’existence même de l’espèce humaine.

L’intelligence territoriale, "projet de recherche action dont l'objet est le développement durable des territoires et dont les sujets sont les communautés territoriales" (Girardot, 2008, 2013)  veut établir la perspective d'un autre modèle de développement orienté par l'amélioration du bien-être de chacun et de tous (Conseil de l'Europe, 2005), élaboré démocratiquement par chaque communauté territoriale. Elle propose un processus de co-construction d’une intelligence collective qui met en relation les acteurs d’un territoire, au sein de la communauté territoriale, pour élaborer de façon concertée un projet local durable et le réaliser de façon coopérative, transparente, rationnelle et équitable. La participation de la communauté territoriale, et de chaque personne, vise à améliorer la qualité de vie de chacun et de tous.

Transition socio-écologique et résilience des territoires vulnérables

Pour ce faire, l’intelligence territoriale adhère au concept de transition socio-écologique qui propose de profiter des défis démographiques, économiques, sociaux et environnementaux, pour inventer de nouveaux modèles de développement afin d’anticiper ces défis, et de renverser l’augmentation des inégalités sociales et territoriales (Baer, Commission Européenne, 2009). L'intelligence territoriale met l’accent sur les changements dans les comportements sociaux, mais aussi individuels, qui contribueront, s’ils sont stimulés par des réformes structurelles et des gouvernances adéquates, à diminuer la consommation des ressources fossiles et à résorber les inégalités sociales et territoriales.

Les communautés territoriales sont incitées à se réapproprier leurs territoires pour en améliorer la résilience en valorisant des initiatives qui ont été marginalisées par la financiarisation de l’économie.

L’intelligence territoriale contribue ainsi au moyen d’une approche multidisciplinaire au plan scientifique et multisectorielle au plan de l’action, à la combinaison équilibrée de l’efficience économique, de l’équité sociale et de la protection de l’environnement. Elle se distingue de l’intelligence économique qui poursuit uniquement un avantage compétitif, un gain monétaire, sur le marché concurrentiel globalisé. L'intelligence territoriale ne confond pas le territoire avec un marché, ou une entreprise, ni les citoyens avec des clients ou des salariés. Elle n’est pas uniquement préoccupée par la compétitivité économique.

La résilience territoriale est un des concepts clés de la transition socio-écologique, popularisé par Rob Hopkins dans le “Transition handbook” (2008). La résilience s’inspire de la conception de Hollings (1973) selon laquelle après une perturbation le système n'est pas marqué par un retour à l'équilibre, expression d'un comportement mécanique, mais réagit souvent au contraire de manière positive, créatrice, grâce à de multiples réajustements. Dans la mesure où « Le concept de transition évoque l’opportunité de co-construction d’une évolution rationnelle, pacifique et transparente, mais radicale, contre le risque d’un changement autoritaire » (Girardot, 2012) « La résilience d’un territoire décrit la capacité de sa communauté à assumer pacifiquement sa transition d’un développement fondés sur le critère du gain égoïste à court terme vers un développement durable, conciliant les objectifs économiques, sociaux, environnement et culturels face chocs externes qui accroissant sa vulnérabilité et qui peuvent remettre en cause son existence » (Girardot, 2013).

Nous proposons de poursuivre dans le cas spécifique des territoires vulnérables la réflexion engagée à l’occasion des rencontres internationales de Roscoff (mai 2014) : Comment développer un agenda de transition et une analyse intégrée de la résilience des territoires, soulignant les risques et les opportunités ? Quels sont les bornes de l'agenda de transition et les indicateurs de la résilience ? Comment s’articulent-ils avec les modes de gouvernance des territoires et en particulier avec une gouvernance latérale participative?

Observation des territoires vulnérables

Dans une logique d’intelligence territoriale, l’observation territoriale se fonde sur la collecte, le partage et le croisement de données sur les usagers, les services et les indicateurs territoriaux, afin d’élaborer et d’argumenter des projets partenariaux, de les suivre et de les évaluer de façon participative.

À l’échelle locale elle est confrontée à cinq difficultés majeures :

  • La plus importante est le manque d’information publique disponible au niveau infra communal.
  • Paradoxalement nous pouvons être confrontés à une masse d’informations aux plus petites échelles.
  • On trouve ensuite peu d’indicateurs sociaux et environnementaux cohérents avec le développement durable.
  • Les disparités entre les secteurs d’activité, les découpages spatiaux et l’actualisation dans le temps des données compliquent la représentation cartographique.
  • L’information locale manque encore de transparence.

Ces difficultés sont a priori plus importantes dans les territoires vulnérables. Quelles formes prennent-elles alors ? Comment y remédier ?

La valorisation du territoire

La valorisation du territoire a un objet plus ambitieux que la compétitivité économique. Elle se réfère au concept d’intelligence collective qui évalue les « résultats tirés de la collaboration et du partage de l’information, avec ceux de la compétition entre de nombreux individus … L’intelligence collective peut être considérée comme une forme de réseau, qui a été activé par l'évolution récente des technologies de l'information » (Prior, 2010).

Le développement territorial n'est pas limité à la croissance économique, ni à la compétition économique. La logique économique du partenariat, instrument de l’approche globale, se fonde d’abord sur la coopération (y compris au sein des « pôles de compétitivité »), et vise à rassembler les ressources locales disponibles avant de recourir à d’autres moyens. Les réseaux permettent aux acteurs privés, aux associations et aux personnes, comme aux acteurs publics, de prendre part aux décisions dans le cadre de la démocratie participative. La valorisation du territoire considère ce dernier à la fois comme un espace de compétition et de coopération.

La qualité du territoire

La qualité du territoire est un concept complémentaire à celui de valorisation.  À l’origine la qualité est la capacité d’un produit ou d’un service à satisfaire les besoins exprimés ou latents des consommateurs. Ce sont les attributs intrinsèques du produit ou du service. La satisfaction du client et l’amélioration continue du produit ou du service sont au centre du concept. S’agissant du territoire, la définition de la qualité prend une dimension plus large, où la communauté territoriale se substitue aux consommateurs et les dimensions du développement durable aux attributs. Dès lors, on peut définir la qualité du territoire comme la capacité de ce dernier à répondre aux attentes de sa communauté à travers l’amélioration continue de ses dimensions économiques, sociales, environnementales et culturelles. Elle est souvent assimilée à la qualité de vie, un concept né à la suite des évolutions des modes de vie de la société actuelle et de la perception des risques engendrés par le développement économique.

Initiatives dans les territoires vulnérables

Indépendamment des programmes internationaux et nationaux, le développement durable se caractérise par des  initiatives locales portées par des collectivités locales, des associations, des groupes informels ou des personnes privées.

Nous nous intéressons à celles qui s'inscrivent dans le processus de transition socio-écologique, contribuent à la résilience du territoire, valorisent le territoire et illustrent sa qualité.

Modalités de soumission

Les propositions de communications doivent comprendre

Sous la forme d’un résumé de 400 mots maximum en anglais ou en français, en indiquant au début :

  • Le titre,
  • L’auteur et ses coordonnées professionnelles,
  • La forme proposée : exposé, poster ou démonstration,
  • La thématique concerné : A, B, …

Elles doivent être adressées par mail à : m.oudada@uiz.ac.ma avec copie à jjg@mshe.univ-fcomte.fr

avant le 20 mai.

Les propositions de communications seront évaluées en double aveugle.

Comité scientifique

  • Jean-Jacques Girardot, assistant professor of economy,  MSHE USR 3124 CNRS/UFC/UTBM, ThéMA UMR 6049 CNRS/UFC/UB, Université de Franche-Comté, France.
Scientific coordinator of International Network of Territorial Intelligence.
  • Mohamed Oudada, professor of geography, Faculté Polyidisciplinaire de Ouarzazate, Université Ibn Zohr d’Agadir Morocco.  Coordinator of ESEAD
  • Cyril Masselot, assistant professor of information and communication science, MSHE USR 3124 CNRS/UFC/UTBM, CIMEOS EA 4177-UB, Université de Franche-Comté, France. .
  • Serge Ormaux, full professor of geography, ThéMA UMR 6049 CNRS/UFC/UB, Université de Franche-Comté, France.
  • Philippe Woloszyn, researcher, Laboratoire "Espaces et Sociétés" (ESO), UMR 6590 CNRS/URENNES2, Université de Rennes 2, France.
  • Giovanna Truda, professor of sociology, Université de Salerno, Italy.
  • Blanca Miedes Ugarte, assistant professor of economy, C3IT, OLE Observatorio local de Empleo, Universidad de Huelva, Spain.
  • Guénaël Devillet, assistant professor of geography, SEGEFA Service d’Étude en Géographie Économique Fondamentale et Appliquée ULG/FNRS, Université de Liège, Belgique.
  • Natale Ammaturo, full professeur of sociology, DISUFF Dipartimento di Scienze Umane, Filosofiche e della Formazione, Université de Salerno, Italy.
  • Horacio Bozzano, full professeur of geography, Equipo TAG Territorio Actores Gobernanza UNLP/CONICET, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina.
  • Raul Montenegro, full professeur of evolutive biology, Alternative Nobel Price  2004 (Stockholm), Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina .
  • Nanta Novello Paglianti, assistant professor of information and communication science, MSHE USR 3124 CNRS/UFC/UTBM, CIMEOS EA 4177-UB, Université de Franche-Comté, France .
  • Sylvie Damy, assistant professor of computer science, UMR Chrono-environnement  6249 CNRS/UFC,  Université de Franche-Comté,  France.
  • Bénédicte Herrmann, assistant professor of computer science, Laboratoire Femto-ST UMR 7174 CNRS/UFC/ENSMM, Université de Franche-Comté, France,
  • Marc Cote, emeritus professor of geography, Université de Provence, Aix-en-Provence, France.
  • Mohamed Ait Hamza, full professor of geography, Université Mohamed V, Rabat, Morocco.
  • Brahim Akdim, full professor of geography, Université Sidi Mohammed Ben Abdellah, Fès, Morocco.
  • Mohamed Daoud, full professor of geography,  Université Chouaib Doukkali, Eljadida, Morocco.
  • Mohamed Benattou, full professor of geography, Université Ibn Zohr, Agadir, Morocco.
  • El Madani Mountasser, full professor of geography, Université Ibn Zohr, Agadir, Morocco.
  • Abdelhadi Bounar, full professor of geography, Université Ibn Zohr, Agadir, Morocco.
  • Lakbir Ouhajou, full professor of geography, Université Ibn Zohr, Agadir, Morocco.
  • Hassan Benhalima full professor of geography, Université Ibn Zohr, Agadir, Morocco.
  • Elhassane Elmahdad, full professor of geography, Université Ibn Zohr, Agadir, Morocco.
  • Ahmed Belkadi, full professor of geography, Université Ibn Zohr, Agadir, Morocco.
  • Otman Ait Ouarasse, professor of english language, Faculté Pluridisciplinaire de Ouarzazate, Université Ibn Zohr, Agadir, Morocco.

Proprogramme prévisionnel

Mercredi 21 octobre 2015

Matin:

  • 08h30-09h00: Accueil des participants
  • 09h00-10h00: Discours d’accueil
  • 10h15-12h15: Conférence invitées

12h30: Repas

Après-midi:

  • 14h00-15h45: Communications en ateliers thématiques
  • 16h00-17h45: Communications en ateliers thématiques

Jeudi 22 octobre 2015

Matin:

  • 08h30-10h15: Communications en ateliers thématiques
  • 10h30-12h15: Communications en ateliers thématiques

12h30 Repas – lunch

Après-midi

  • 14h00-15h45: Communications en ateliers thématiques
  • 16h00-17h30: Synthèse des ateliers thématiques
  • 17h30-18h00: Clôture de la conférence
  • 16h30: Fin de la conférence

Calendrier

  • April 30: Inscription
  • May 20: Deadline pour les propositions de communication
  • Juin 30: Deadline pour l’évaluation des propositions
  • Juillet 30: Retour des articles complets.
  • Sept. 20 : Publication des articles complt

Droits d'inscription et prix indicatifs

Inscription : 1650 dirahms, (150 euros)

Chambre single en demi-pension (pdj inclus) : 60 euros par nuit. (paiement sur place)

Vol Paris–Ourzazate, Royal Air Maroc. (350 euros environ selon dates)

Places

  • Ouarzazate, Kingdom of Morocco

Date(s)

  • Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Keywords

  • intelligence territoriale, développement durable, territoire, observation, gouvernance, participation

Contact(s)

  • Jean-Jacques Girardot
    courriel : jjg [at] mshe [dot] univ-fcomte [dot] fr
  • Mohamed Oudada
    courriel : m [dot] oudada [at] uiz [dot] ac [dot] ma

Reference Urls

Information source

  • Jean-Jacques Girardot
    courriel : jjg [at] mshe [dot] univ-fcomte [dot] fr

To cite this announcement

« Sustainable Development of Vulnerable Territories », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Wednesday, April 22, 2015, https://calenda.org/326253

Archive this announcement

  • Google Agenda
  • iCal