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Margins (XIth-XVIIth Century)

Marges (XIe-XVIIe siècles)

5th International Postgraduate Symposium of Transitions

5es Journées doctorales internationales de Transitions 

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Published on Thursday, July 04, 2019 by Anastasia Giardinelli

Summary

From History to Philology, to Art History, to Codicology, and Linguistics, the notion of margin is omnipresent. This meaningful concept, both in its literal and figurative acceptions, has remained at the heart of critical thought for a long time, as scholars have sought to reflect on its particular potentialities whilst attempting to renew approaches to their own subjects of study. Participants, starting from their specific subjects and disciplines, are invited to reflect on the notion of margin, on the similar notions of limit and border, and on the place they hold in their own research.

Announcement

Presentation

The Research Unit Transitions (Research Department on the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period, University of Liège), in collaboration with the CESCM (Centre d’étudessupérieures de civilisation médiévale, University of Poitiers) and the Center for Medieval Literature (University of York and University of Southern Denmark, Odense) is pleased to open the call for its biennial postgraduate symposium, divided in three sessions.

These meetings are organized by PhD candidates and constitute a platform for exchange between junior researchers and senior colleagues of different fields, such as History, Philology, Linguistics, Art History, Literature, Codicology, Paleography, or Book History.

The first session will be held in Liège, Belgium, on February 5th-6th 2020 and will be dedicated to the notion of margins (XIth-XVIIth centuries).

Themes

From History to Philology, to Art History, to Codicology, and Linguistics, the notion of margin is omnipresent. This meaningful concept, both in its literal and figurative acceptions, has remained at the heart of critical thought for a long time, as scholars have sought to reflect on its particular potentialities whilst attempting to renew approaches to their own subjects of study.

The traditional idea of “border” and the fertile notional duo “centre/periphery” still raise central questions: what are the relations between the so-called centre and “its”periphery? What are the dynamics in terms of power and supremacy (in the political, religious, cultural, artistic or linguistic domains)? Is the concept of Kunstgeographiestill relevant today? Moreover, we know that the geographic border tends to determine some fields of study. But how do language and literature evolve in bordering territories? How do art and literature play with these borders? What are the limits of fictional spaces and fictional worlds? How can one work beyond these limits, and do they need to be overcome?

The margin can also be interpreted in relation to a norm. It might then become a space of either constraint or freedom to be used by artists and authors in the creation of works that synthesize both tradition and innovation. How do authors, painters, sculptors, and architects engage with codes and norms to conceive novelty? Can we identify any resistances or opposition to these rules? In which ways do grammarians establish the norms of a language? What is the impact of their prescriptions on writing practices and language productions, above all on literature and on specific strata of society (e.g. the concept of sociolect)? Do rules lead to resistance or opposition to the rule, and how can the latter be described?

Margins can be also be studied for their materiality, e.g. when separating real and fictional worlds. Marginalia, grotesques, trompe l’œil – the artist cleverly transgresses the structural limits imposed by the frame. In the paratext, the copyist or the printer interacts with other contributors to the making or the reception of a book (corrections, glosses, instructions for the illuminator, engraver or reader). This space is also where the owner makes himself known (ex libris, comments), and where redactors and planners of manuscripts create a setup to facilitate the interaction between text and reader (titles, summaries).

Participants, starting from their specific subjects and disciplines, are invited to reflect on the notion of margin, on the similar notions of limit and border, and on the place they hold in their own research.

Presentations (c. 20 min.) can be given in either English, French, German, Spanish or Italian. At the end of each presentation, there will be time for questions and comments; the organizers strongly encourage all participants to engage in transdisciplinary discussions.

Practical Informations

Proposal must be submitted by August 31th 2019 at the latest, in pdf format, and sent by e-mail to RU Transitions (transitions.jd2020@gmail.com). The proposal will include the name and surname of the PhD candidate and those of their advisor(s), as well as the title of the thesis, the starting year of their PhD, the title of the lecture and a fifteen-line abstract, written in French, English, German, Spanish or Italian.

Applicants will be contacted by September 15th 2019, after the committee completes the selection process. At the end of the symposium, a certificate of participation will be released on request.

RU Transitions is delighted to offer lunches and coffee breaks to the participants. Travel and accomodation costs, however, will be at the expense of participants or of their research centres.

Organising committee

  • Giulia Barison
  • Alexandre Goderniaux
  • Eva Trizzullo
  • Gaylen Vankan
  • Véronique Winand

Scientific committee

  • Renaud Adam
  • Giulia Barison
  • Émilie Corswarem
  • Laure Fagnart
  • Alexandre Goderniaux
  • Marie-Élisabeth Henneau
  • Julie Piront
  • Eva Trizzullo
  • Gaylen Vankan
  • Véronique Winand

About Transitions

From the Middle Ages until the upheavals brought about by Galilean science, Europe underwent a period of unceasing questioning which challenged the political stability and its legitimacy, shook the foundations of confessional unity, and expanded the limits of knowledge and creation. In an attempt to transcend the inherited divisions of a long historiographical tradition, the Research Unit Transitions at the University of Liege (http://web.philo.ulg.ac.be/transitions/fr/) explores these constant transformations in the Western and in the Mediterranean Basin. Open to Medievalists and Modernists, it promotes confrontation between research practices, original collaborations, and the sharing of results in an interdisciplinary fashion. Furthermore, it attempts to elucidate several factors which have contributed to the construction of the social and cultural frameworks by which we define ourselves even today.

Places

  • Université de Liège, Place du 20 Août 7
    Liège, Belgium (4000)

Date(s)

  • Saturday, August 31, 2019

Keywords

  • marges; margins; limites; limits; histoire; histoire de l'art; linguistique; littérature; codicologie; histoire du livre; literature; history; art history

Contact(s)

  • Eva Trizzullo
    courriel : e [dot] trizzullo [at] uliege [dot] be

Reference Urls

Information source

  • Eva Trizzullo
    courriel : e [dot] trizzullo [at] uliege [dot] be

To cite this announcement

« Margins (XIth-XVIIth Century) », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Thursday, July 04, 2019, https://calenda.org/647363

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