HomeQuestioning the Crime of Witchcraft

Calenda - The calendar for arts, humanities and social sciences

Questioning the Crime of Witchcraft

Le crime de sorcellerie en débat

Definitions, Receptions and Realities (14th-16th Centuries)

Définitions, réceptions et réalités (XIVe-XVIe siècle)

*  *  *

Published on Thursday, October 15, 2020 by Céline Guilleux

Summary

In the last decades, the multiplications of works in the field of Witchcraft Studies made it possible to profoundly renew the approaches and the study designs of the repression of witchcraft in the late Middle Ages and in the beginning of the Early Modern Era. Consequently, research has substantially specified the methods and configurations (ideological, political and doctrinal) that contribute to the genesis of the “witch-hunt”. Research also uncovered that the repression of witchcraft could take a number of different forms depending on the contexts, the spaces studied, the sources and the aims they seem to pursue. It underlines the extreme plasticity of the accusation of witchcraft and the categories of such a crime. Hence, the conference aims to focus the discussions on three main areas: the definition of the crime of witchcraft, its different receptions and the question of its reality.

La multiplication des travaux ces dernières décennies dans le champ des witchcraft studies a permis de profondément renouveler les approches et les modèles d’étude de la répression de la sorcellerie à la fin du Moyen Âge et au début de l’époque moderne. Par la même, la recherche a grandement précisé les modalités et les configurations (idéologiques, politiques et doctrinales) qui concourent à la genèse de la « chasse aux sorcières ». La recherche a également montré que la répression de la sorcellerie pouvait revêtir des formes très différentes en fonction des contextes et des espaces envisagées, des sources étudiées et des objectifs prêtées à celle-ci, soulignant ainsi l’extrême plasticité de l’accusation de sorcellerie et des catégories de ce crime. Les journées d’étude se proposent ainsi d’orienter les réflexions et les discussions autour de trois axes principaux : la définition du crime de sorcellerie, ses différentes réceptions et la question de sa réalité.

Announcement

Argument

In the last decades, the multiplications of works in the field of Witchcraft Studies made it possible to profoundly renew the approaches and the study designs of the repression of witchcraft in the late Middle Ages and in the beginning of the Early Modern Era. Consequently, research has substantially specified the methods and configurations (ideological, political and doctrinal) that contribute to the genesis of the “witch-hunt”. Research also uncovered that the repression of witchcraft could take a number of different forms depending on the contexts, the spaces studied, the sources and the aims they seem to pursue. It underlines the extreme plasticity of the accusation of witchcraft and the categories of such a crime. Hence, the conference aims to focus the discussions on three main areas: the definition of the crime of witchcraft, its different receptions and the question of its reality.

The goal of the conference is also to discuss the crime of witchcraft by highlighting new fields of research and unstudied sources. The variety of definitions, the modalities of reception and the different realities that the crime of witchcraft had undergone in the late Middle Ages and at the beginning of the Early Modern Era (14th-16th centuries) will be addressed and debated.

Defining the crime of witchcraft: issues, concepts and debates

Historiography has frequently emphasized the richness of the lexicon involved in medieval and early modern sources to name witchcraft and those who practice it. Such a typological abundance is to be seen in the context of the numerous areas where the repression of the crime of witchcraft expanded, starting at the end of the 13th century. The most recent work, in particular those concerning the Alpine region, the Pyrenees and the Kingdom of France, have shown the specific features and the distinctive regional identities of the vocabulary used to define witchcraft.

Moreover, the crime of witchcraft appears as a criminal category with a flexible and dynamic definition where the wording is closely tied to the studied sources. Therefore, the study of witchcraft seems to bear witness that this crime is a concept under construction and in debate at the end of the Middle Ages. If these elements are relatively understood today, a comprehensive review from a comparative perspective remains to be done. The confrontation of various terrains of study mobilizing various materials (judicial, normative, theological sources, pardons, literature, predication) and highlight different production backgrounds (laypersons, clergy, inquisition) would enable us to lead a global reflection on the modalities of the emergence of the crime of witchcraft in the late Middle Ages. It would also help us to clarify the issues of the use of a certain type of vocabulary by highlighting what is at stake depending on the different regional or political units.

Finally, this comparative approach could enable to point out the modalities of diffusion and circulation of the words defining the crime of witchcraft. Therefore, it could permit us to specify the conditions of their reception and their possible influences of the repressive practices against witchcraft.

Reception of the crime of witchcraft: between support and resistance

Beyond its definition, a crime can be diversely received. It is clear that before the beginning the European witch hunt a notion of witchcraft preexists and differs depending on social classes or regions. It corresponds only partially with the concept of Sabbath that emerges in courts starting in the 15th century. It can be seen in the debates of theologians on the reality or fiction of nocturnal flights. It can also be seen in the denunciations generally targeting individuals instead of groups which could be perceived as acting secretly and collectively.

The question of the role of the population in repression is a key element to understand the phenomenon, both in the impact of the popular perception of witchcraft, and in individual actions. If the repression of the diabolical sect could, in certain cases, be exploited by individuals to satisfy their own agenda, oppositions to the concept of Sabbath or to specific trials existed. They are generally difficult to grasp since justice is exercised by the dominant. Those who wanted to contest, to avoid an open revolt, had to accept disguised ways to dodge any sanction. Nevertheless, the study of medieval and early modern bookkeeping enables us to provide elements to understand the adherence of populations to the phenomenon of repression.

Realities of the crime of witchcraft: accusations under tension

In historiography, there exists broad consensus stating that the Sabbath as well as most crimes of which the defendants were accused did not actually occur. Based on this hypothesis generally demonstrated since the 1970s, most historians are now asking the question of the reality which lies behind the crime. If most of the charges against the individuals accused of witchcraft cannot be proven, what pieces of information can be extracted from these documents? The points of view are many. Should the trials be read in a way that picks out elements falling outside the expected framework of their production? Should this information be compared with other sources informing us about social and political tensions within the communities or about the agenda of judges? And finally, what is the influence of the conservation of certain sources on our own vision of the phenomenon?

Papers with topics related to these different themes are particularly welcomed. The conference will be in French and in English. The conference is open to young researchers, PhD students, Post-doctoral researchers as well as advanced graduate students.

Submission

You are invited to submit a 300-word abstract with key words in either English or French

by November 30th, 2020

to the following email address: maxime.perbellini@ehess.fr.

Please include: a brief résumé, the title of your presentation, as well as your name and your academic affiliation. Please send any additional questions you may have to the aforementioned email address. The presentations will have to be 20 minutes long maximum.

Organisers

The conference is organized by Maxime Gelly-Perbellini (PhD student at the School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (EHESS, Paris, France) and at the Free University of Brussels, Belgium, Research and Teaching Assistant at the University of Reims Champagne-Ardennes, France) and Olivier Silberstein (PhD student at the University of Neufchâtel, Switzerland).

It is sponsored by the School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (EHESS, Paris, France).

Dates and places

It will take place on the premises of the School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (EHESS, Paris, France) on May 20th-21st 2021. The conference would start on May 20th at 2pm and would end on May 21st at 5pm.

Argumentaire

La multiplication des travaux ces dernières décennies dans le champ des Witchcraft Studies a permis de profondément renouveler les approches et les modèles d’étude de la répression de la sorcellerie à la fin du Moyen Âge et au début de l’époque moderne. Par la même, la recherche a grandement précisé les modalités et les configurations (idéologiques, politiques et doctrinales) qui concourent à la genèse de la « chasse aux sorcières ». La recherche a également montré que la répression de la sorcellerie pouvait revêtir des formes très différentes en fonction des contextes et des espaces envisagées, des sources étudiées et des objectifs prêtées à celle-ci, soulignant ainsi l’extrême plasticité de l’accusation de sorcellerie et des catégories de ce crime. Les journées d’étude se proposent ainsi d’orienter les réflexions et les discussions autour de trois axes principaux : la définition du crime de sorcellerie, ses différentes réceptions et la question de sa réalité.

L'objet de ces journées d'étude est également de mettre en débat le crime de sorcellerie, en valorisant notamment les nouveaux terrains de la recherche et les dossiers inédits sur cette question, dans le but d’examiner et de débattre de la variété des définitions, des modalités de réception et des différentes réalités que le crime de sorcellerie pouvait revêtir à la fin du Moyen Âge et au début de l’époque moderne (XIVe-XVIe siècle).

Définir le crime de sorcellerie : enjeux, concepts et débats

L’historiographie a souvent souligné la richesse du lexique mobilisé dans les sources médiévales et modernes pour désigner la sorcellerie, et ceux qui la pratiquent. Ce foisonnement typologique est notamment à mettre en relation avec la diversité des espaces dans lesquels s’est développée la répression du crime de sorcellerie, à partir de la fin du XIIIe siècle. Les travaux les plus récents, portant notamment sur l’espace alpin, sur l’espace pyrénéen ainsi que sur le royaume de France, ont montré les différentes spécificités et les particularités régionales du vocabulaire employé pour définir la sorcellerie. De plus, le crime de sorcellerie apparaît comme une catégorie criminelle à la définition plastique et mobile dont la formulation est intimement liée aux types de sources mobilisés par l’historien. Ainsi, l’étude de la sorcellerie semble activement témoigner que ce crime est un concept en construction et en débat à la fin du Moyen Âge. Si aujourd’hui les données sont relativement bien connues, la synthèse dans une perspective comparatiste reste à faire. La confrontation de différents terrains d’enquête, mobilisant des matériaux diversifiés (sources judiciaires, normatives, théologiques, pratiques gracieuses, littérature, prédication) et mettant en évidence des milieux de production différents (laïcs, ecclésiastiques, inquisitoriaux) permettrait de conduire une réflexion globale sur les modalités de configuration du crime de sorcellerie à la fin Moyen Âge. Elle permettrait également de préciser les enjeux de la mobilisation d’un type de vocabulaire ou d’un autre en mettant en évidence d’éventuels jeux d’échelles en fonction d’unités régionales et politiques différentes. Enfin, la démarche comparatiste permettrait également de préciser les modalités de diffusion et de circulation des mots qui définissent le crime de sorcellerie en mettant en évidence les conditions de leurs réceptions et leurs possibles influences sur les pratiques répressives à l’encontre de la sorcellerie.

Réceptions du crime de sorcellerie : entre adhésion et résistance

Au-delà de sa définition se pose la question de la réception du crime. Il est certain qu’avant le début de la chasse aux sorcières, il préexiste une conception de la sorcellerie qui diffère en fonction des classes sociales et des régions. Celle-ci ne correspond que partiellement avec le concept du sabbat qui émergent dans les tribunaux à partir du XVe siècle. On le voit notamment à travers les débats des théologiens sur la réalité ou la fiction du vol nocturne, mais également à travers les dénonciations qui ciblent généralement des individus et non des groupes perçus comme agissant secrètement et collectivement. La question du rôle de la population dans la répression est un élément clé de la compréhension du phénomène, que ce soit par l’impact de la vision populaire de la sorcellerie ou dans des actions individuelles. Si la répression de la secte diabolique peut, dans certains cas, être instrumentalisée par des individus pour satisfaire leur propre agenda, des oppositions au concept du sabbat ou à des procès spécifiques existent. Elles sont bien souvent difficiles à saisir puisque la justice est exercée par les dominants. Ceux qui voudraient la contester, sauf révolte ouverte, doivent se contenter d’actions voilées pour éviter la sanction. Néanmoins, l’étude des comptabilités médiévales ou modernes permet d’apporter des éléments à la question de l’adhésion des populations au phénomène de la répression.

Réalités du crime de sorcellerie : l’accusation en tension

Au sein de l’historiographie, il existe un consensus important pour dire que le sabbat et la plupart des crimes qui sont reprochés aux accusées n’ont pas réellement eu lieu. Partant de cette hypothèse largement démontrée depuis les années 1970, la plupart des historiens se posent la question de la réalité qui se trouve derrière le crime. Si l’essentiel des charges retenues contre les individus accusés de sorcellerie ne peuvent être considérées comme avérées, quelles informations peut-on extraire de ces documents ? Les points de vue sont nombreux. Faut-il lire les procès en cherchant à isoler les éléments qui sortent du cadre attendu de leur production ? Croiser ces informations avec d’autres sources qui nous renseignent sur les tensions sociales ou politiques des communautés, ou les agendas des juges ? Et enfin, quelle est l’influence de la conservation des sources sur notre vision propre du phénomène ?

Des communications en lien avec ces différentes thématiques seront particulièrement remarquées.

Les langues des journées d’étude seront le français et éventuellement l’anglais.

Il s’agit de journées d’étude qui est également ouverte aux jeunes chercheurs et donc aux doctorants, post-doctorants ainsi qu’aux masterants avancés.

Comment candidater

Pour candidater, envoyer un mail à cet appel à communication (à l’adresse suivante : maxime.perbellini@ehess.fr)

le 30 novembre 2020 au plus tard

avec un titre et un court résumé (max. 300 mots) de la communication envisagée. Les communications devront être d’une durée de 20min.

Organisation

Les journées d’étude sont organisées par Maxime Gelly-Perbellini (doctorant à l’EHESS et à l’Université Libre de Bruxelles, ATER à l’Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne) et Olivier Silberstein (doctorant à l’Université de Neufchâtel). Elles sont portées par l’Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales.

Dates et lieux

Elles se tiendront dans les locaux de l’Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales les 20 et 21 mai 2021. Les journées d’étude internationales débuteront le 20 mai à 14H00 et s’achèvera le 21 mai à 17H00.

Date(s)

  • Monday, November 30, 2020

Keywords

  • medieval history, early modern history, witchcraft studies, criminal law, witch, witch-hunt, european witch-hunt

Contact(s)

  • Maxime Gelly-Perbellini
    courriel : maxime [dot] perbellini [at] ehess [dot] fr

Information source

  • Maxime Gelly-Perbellini
    courriel : maxime [dot] perbellini [at] ehess [dot] fr

To cite this announcement

« Questioning the Crime of Witchcraft », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Thursday, October 15, 2020, https://calenda.org/808891

Archive this announcement

  • Google Agenda
  • iCal
Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search