Página inicialFreedom and Death in the Greek Revolution of 1821

Página inicialFreedom and Death in the Greek Revolution of 1821

Freedom and Death in the Greek Revolution of 1821

Microhistorical analyses of battles in the Epirotic and Balkan areas

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Publicado quarta, 28 de outubro de 2020 por Céline Guilleux

Resumo

In 2021, during the 200th anniversary of the proclamation of the Greek Revolution of 1821, the Department of History and Archeology will hold another international conference on "Freedom and Death in the Greek Revolution of 1821. Microhistorical analyses of battles in the Epirotic and the Balkan area". The conference will address issues of Greek historiography, such as the Modern Greek Enlightenment in Epirus, Souli, and the networks of Souliotes; operations in Epirus; the battles of Peta, Philhellenes, Plaka, and Kompoti; Lord Byron on Epirus; the strategies of Ali Pasha; the Epirotic networks in Moldovlachia; and the lives and deaths of revolutionaries. Using modern methodological tools and a microhistory approach to conduct systematic research of both new and old archives, the conference will offer original and interesting approaches to an already rich discussion.

Anúncio

University of Ioannina, school of Philosophy, department of history and archaeology

Ioannina-Arta, 1-4th July 2021

Paramythia 25th June 2021

Argument

For about the last ten years, the Department of History and Archeology in the School of Philosophy at the University of Ioannina has conducted a series of courses on the Modern Greek Enlightenment and Greek Revolution. These courses have two main goals. The first is to investigate the historical, political, economic, and cultural dimensions of the Greek revolution using modern, international, and historiographical approaches to place it in the wider revolutionary wave that flooded Europe and the world at the end of the 18th and beginning of the 19th centuries. The second is to familiarize students with contemporaneous and modern interpretations of the Greek Revolution to encourage reflection and critical thinking on this important topic and challenge stereotypes they may have learned from school history, public nationalist rhetoric and national celebrations.

To achieve these goals, the Department of History and Archeology collaborated with the Municipality of Nikolaos Skoufas to conduct two international conferences in 2013 and 2014, one on Hellenism and one on the secret “Society of Friends”, Filiki Etairia. The conference proceedings were published in two volumes:

Anna Mandilara, Giorgos Nikolaou, Lampros Flitouris, & Nikolaos Anastasopoulos (Eds.). (2015). Philhellenism. The interest for Greece and the Greeks from 1821 until now. Athens: Herodotos.

Anna Mandilara, & Giorgos Nikolaou (Eds.). (2017). Filiki Etairia: Revolutionary Action and Secret Societies in Modern Europe. Athens: Asini Publications.

In 2021, during the 200th anniversary of the proclamation of the Greek Revolution of 1821, the Department of History and Archeology will hold another international conference on "Freedom and Death in the Greek Revolution of 1821. Microhistorical analyses of battles in the Epirotic and the Balkan area". The conference will address issues of Greek historiography, such as the Modern Greek Enlightenment in Epirus, Souli, and the networks of Souliotes; operations in Epirus; the battles of Peta, Philhellenes, Plaka, and Kompoti; Lord Byron on Epirus; the strategies of Ali Pasha; the Epirotic networks in Moldovlachia; and the lives and deaths of revolutionaries. Using modern methodological tools and a microhistory approach to conduct systematic research of both new and old archives, the conference will offer original and interesting approaches to an already rich discussion. Specific topics will include the following:

  • Living with death: How many casualties occurred due to hostilities, illness, captivity, hunger, and hardship? What were the perceptions about death, endurance of the body, and medical care? How many people were killed by revolutionaries? Where did refugees on both sides seek shelter?
  • Victory and defeat: How did revolutionaries manage victories and defeats? How did they bury the dead? What was everyday life like in the camps, fortresses, and battlegrounds after victory or defeat? How did they treat prisoners (men vs. women, anonymous vs. well-known)? How did they handle the exchange of hostages? How did they define bravery, sacrifice, and betrayal? How did they define the characteristics of a hero, leader, and revolutionary?
  • The economy of looting: How important was looting during the Battle? What were considered the most important objects to loot? Which items were forbidden to loot? Why did people loot?
  • Holidays, festivals, and mourning: How did the revolutionaries celebrate victories? What entertainment was allowed (e.g., dances, songs)? How did they mourn the dead? What were the obituaries like? How long did they wait between battles and celebrations?
  • Religiosity and superstition: How important was faith in the daily lives of revolutionaries? How was it expressed? How important were popular beliefs and superstitions in rural areas?
  • Surveillance and punishment: What kind of military discipline was applied? What punishments were inflicted on offenders? What was the relationship with the Philhellenes competitors?
  • The "technology" of fighting: What kind of weapons did the revolutionaries use, and where did they get them? What were markets for horses and weapons like? Which weapons and horses were preferred by the Greeks and by the Ottomans?
  • Narratives, silences, and the memory’s war: What kinds of stereotypes have been perpetuated by memoirists? What topics have been avoided? Has art (painting, literature, music, essays) influenced perceptions of the war in Greece and throughout Europe, and if so, how? Adventures of the long-term commemorations: memorial sites and the reanimation of the past.
  • Otherness and everyday life: How did the Greeks see "others" (Westerners, Ottomans) in the pre-revolutionary and revolutionary era? What were relations like between ethnic groups (Israelis, Muslims, Roma, Arvanites, Vlachs, etc.) that remained in the lands of the revolutionaries. What was it like for women in cities and rural areas?
  • New enlightenment: What led to changes in religious consciousness and demographics among former harem of Muslim officials?
  • Western influences: How were Westerners inspired by philhellenic or non-Greek influences? How did these influences affect their views of pre-revolutionary and revolutionary Epirus?

The conference will be held with organizational assistance from the following labs at the University of Ioannina:

  • «Historical Research of Modern and Contemporary Societies»
  • «Archeology and History of Art»
  • «Folk Culture»
  • «Modern Greek Philology»
  • «Balkan and Ottoman Music, History and Civilizations»
  • The conference will take place from 1 to 4 July 2021 in Ioannina and in Arta. 25th of June will be organized a workshop in Paramythia, concerning Souli’s history.
  • The conference will be conducted in Greek, English, and French. Each presentation will not exceed twenty (20) minutes.
  • An effort will be made to cover a large portion of delegates' travel and accommodation expenses.

Important dates

24 November 2020: Deadline to submit proposal.

All proposals must be sent to the following email address: ioannina1821@gmail.com. Proposals should include the participant name, the title of the presentation, a short summary (up to 300 words), and a short biography. Please submit abstracts in .doc or .pdf format.

19 December 2020: The scientific committee will announce the selected proposals.

1-4th July 2021 (Ioannina-Arta) and 25th June 2021 (Paramythia): Conference dates.

Honoris causa committee

  • Prof.Ioannis Tzamtzis, dean of Philosophy School
  • Prof. Ioannis Lolos, President of History/Archeology Dep.
  • Prof. Alexandros Alexakis, President of Literature Dep.
  • Prof. Golfo Maggini, President of Philosophy Dep.

Scientific and organizing committee

  • Anna Mandilara, University of Ioannina
  • Lampros Flitouris, University of Ioannina
  • Giorgos Nikolaou, University of Ioannina
  • Nikos Anastasopoulos, University of Ioannina
  • Elias G. Skoulidas, University of Ioannina
  • Panagiotis Kimourtzis, University of Aegean
  • Aris Sarafianos, University of Ioannina
  • Renata Dalianoudi, University of Ioannina
  • Vasilis Sabatakakis, University of Lund
  • Dimitris Kargiotis, University of Ioannina
  • Golfo Maggini, University of Ioannina

Locais

  • Ioannina, Arta and Paramythia
    Ioannina, Grécia

Datas

  • terça, 24 de novembro de 2020

Ficheiros anexos

Palavras-chave

  • Greek Revolution, 1821, Nationalism

Contactos

  • Flitouris Lampros
    courriel : flitouris [at] gmail [dot] com

Fonte da informação

  • Flitouris Lampros
    courriel : flitouris [at] gmail [dot] com

Para citar este anúncio

« Freedom and Death in the Greek Revolution of 1821 », Chamada de trabalhos, Calenda, Publicado quarta, 28 de outubro de 2020, https://calenda.org/811381

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