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  • Paris

    Conference, symposium - Thought

    Life and Mind. Aristotelian themes in contemporary philosophy

    Despite the interest in exploring Aristotelian themes in contemporary philosophy, there has been no coordinated attempt to survey or integrate the ways in which Aristotle’s approach to understanding life, mind, and the relation between them might inform and enrich our own. The objective of this workshop is to explore the way in which Aristotelian thought can brought to bear on contemporary research on the much-debated issue of the so-called mind-body problem and on its implications for the conceptualization of notions such as that of organism, animal and human perception and action, human moral agency, and the relation between mind and life.

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  • Cairo

    Conference, symposium - History

    Clamour from the past

    Graffiti, rock inscriptions and secondary epigraphy from Ancient Egypt

    The practice of graffiti, rock inscriptions and secondary epigraphy in Ancient Egypt need to be examined, elucidated and evaluated in relation to their archaeological and environmental contexts. This conference seeks to render ever more discernible these voices from the past, long regarded as inconsequential and perfunctory, by shedding new light on their interrelational links with visual reception, society and culture. The papers aim to map corpora of graffiti throughout the Egyptian space and to address common issues of definitions and interpretations.

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  • Dundee

    Call for papers - History

    International Postgraduate Port and Maritime Studies Network Annual Conference

    Established in 2016, the International Postgraduate Port and Maritime Studies Network brings together postgraduates working on port and maritime studies across a wide range of chronologies and geographies. The network is supported by the Centre for Port and Maritime History, a collaborative venture between The University of Liverpool, Liverpool John Moores University, and Merseyside Maritime Museum, which facilitates research on port cities and their relationship to maritime endeavour and enterprise. Our network is currently comprised of postgraduates from universities in the Basque Country, Crete, Hamburg and New South Wales, as well as from various institutions across the UK.

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  • Paris

    Call for papers - History

    Agrarian Modernization, a global transboundary process that generates local asymmetries

    4th International Conference of the European Organisation for Rural History (EURHO)

    This panel wants to analyze the technology transference during Agrarian Modernization and point its inpact at the socio-environmental level from a comparative and connected global perspective. The geopolitical context and the social reality of the different regions where it expanded were quite different, as well as the interest of local elites. Therefore, the effects of this cultural and technological package differed according to the diverse geographical, environmental, economic and social particularities where it spread. Although this process has allowed the connection between the spaces of production and consumption, it ignored local particularities. And had and enormous social cost, as broad rural sectors have been excluded and have become urban poors.

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  • Brussels

    Call for papers - History

    Identity, citizenship and legal history

    XXVth Annual Forum of Young Legal Historians

    The conference continues the long-standing tradition of the Association of Young Legal Historians of providing a general meeting spot for young scholars working on the history of law. It seeks to transcend communal boundaries to further research and to stimulate the exchange of ideas. Ever since her foundation twenty-five years ago the Association has been able to attract a loyal and returning group of young scholars from many countries across Europe and the wider world. In 2019, it is our honour to welcome you to Brussels.

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  • Paris | Nanterre

    Study days - Representation

    Ancient and Early Medieval building techniques in the mediterranean area: from East to West

    This workshop is devoted to the study of the ancient construction techniques in the Near East from the Roman period to the Early Islamic era and on the transmission and diffusion of these techniques in the Mediterranean basin.

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  • Ariel

    Summer School - Prehistory and Antiquity

    Mapping Ancient Gods

    ERC Advanced Grant MAP project (Mapping Ancient Polytheisms. Cult Epithets as an Interface between Religious Systems and Human Agency)

    The ERC Advanced Grant MAP project (Mapping Ancient Polytheisms. Cult Epithets as an Interface between Religious Systems and Human Agency; 741182; http://map-polytheisms.huma-num.fr1) works on the naming systems for the divine in the Greek and Western Semitic worlds, from 1000 BCE to 400 CE and views them as testimonies to the way in which divine powers are constructed, arranged and involved within ritual. The analysis deals both with the structural aspects of the religious systems and with their contextual appropriation by social participants. Considered to be elements of a complex language, the onomastic channels are related to the gods, therefore providing access to a mapping process of the divine, to its ways of representation and to the communication strategies between men and gods.Within this framework, the MAP Team proposes a Summer School in collaboration with the French Research Centre in Jerusalem (http://www.crfj.org) which covers the project’s themes and tools.

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  • Lyon

    Conference, symposium - Prehistory and Antiquity

    Ancient Armenia at the Crossroads

    In honor of Arkady Karakhanyan

    The aim of the conference is to exchange recent archaeological and environmental data obtained in Armenia and to bring together the points of view of researchers from various disciplines in the fields of Human Sciences and Environmental Sciences. Particular attention will be paid to the theme of traffic flows: the movement of people, in connection with the evolution of the environment; the circulation of techniques and know-how and the circulation of raw materials and objects.

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  • Nanterre

    Conference, symposium - Prehistory and Antiquity

    Textiles and Gender: Production to wardrobe from the Orient to the Mediterranean in Antiquity

    Textiles and gender intertwine on many levels, from the transformation of raw materials into fabric at one end, to dress and garments, and the construction of identity at the other. The conference will examine the gender division of work in the production of textiles, as well as attitudes to dress and gender across the Near East and Mediterranean culture in antiquity (c. 3000 BCE-300CE), tracing both cross-cultural and culturally specific associations.

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  • Mainz

    Conference, symposium - History

    Views from inside the linked Open Data (LOD) cloud

    Linked pasts IV

    Linked Pasts is an annual symposium dedicated to facilitating practical and pragmatic developments in Linked Open Data (LOD) in History, Classics, Geography, and Archaeology. It brings together leading exponents of Linked Data from academia, the Cultural Heritage sector as well as providers of infrastructures and library services to address the obstacles to, and issues raised by, developing a digital ecosystem of projects dedicated to interlinking online resources about the past.

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  • Jarandilla de la Vera

    Call for papers - Religion

    Dressing Divinely: clothed or naked deities an devotees

    The XVII International Colloquium of the Association ARYS (Antiquity, Religions and Societies) is dedicated to the study of the links between religious identity and clothing within the framework of ancient societies and religions, from the perspective of the images either of the gods or of their devotees. Within the topic of religious clothing will be included the religious use of clothes and attributes, accesories, ornaments, body modifications such as mutilations or tattoos, hairstyles, nudity and, of course, the action itself of dressing or undressing, its conception and positive, neutral or negative consideration, or the act of assuming any of those human or divine complements, adornments, attributes or modifications of the body. We welcome the participation of consolidated as well as early-career specialists in the field of ancient history, archaeology, religious sciences, art history and historiography of religions.

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  • Paris

    Conference, symposium - History

    The old Babylonian Diyala: research since the 1930s and prospects

    The region around the river Diyala, which runs approximately 500 km, from the mountains between Iraq and Iran, down to the south of Baghdad where it joins the Tigris, was the home of dozens of cities, villages and communities during the long history of ancient Mesopotamia. In the first centuries of the second millennium BCE, the strategic position of the region turned it into a point of articulation, dispute and mediation of the Babylonian area in the south and the Assyrian area in the north. Added to the growing power of the city of Eshnunna, this led the region to play a significant role in the international politics of those times.

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  • Medford

    Call for papers - Representation

    Ancient Greek and Roman painting and the Digital Humanities

    When in 1921, A. Reinach published the Recueil des textes grecs et latins relatifs à la peinture ancienne (Recueil Milliet), it was mainly to make accessible these texts about painting and aesthetics to a broader audience. Since two years, a team gathered around the Perseus Digital Library and the Perseids Project (Tufts University) seek to revitalize the Recueil Milliet (an essential tool for historians of Greek and Roman Art) implementing it into a digitalized format (http://digmill.perseids.org/commentary). In relation to the work made, the proposed conference seek to question methodologies which combine Digital Humanities and scientific research, especially in the field of history of Greek and Roman art. But also, to put forward the relationship between textual sources and the most recent archaeological findings.

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  • Florence

    Call for papers - Epistemology and methodology

    Constructing Kurgans

    Burial mounds and funerary customs in the Caucasus, Northwestern Iran and Eastern Anatolia during the Bronze and Iron Age

    The tradition of burying the dead in burial mounds (kurgans), usually consisting of a funerary chamber limited by stone or brickslabs and covered by dirt and gravel, started in the fourth millennium BCE in the northern Caucasus and then spread south to the rest of the Caucasus regions, eastern Anatolia and northwestern Iran during the Bronze Age and Iron Age. The spread of the kurgan tradition, as well as the territorial, political, social, and cultural values embedded in their construction and their symbolic relation to the surrounding landscape are under debate. The workshop aims to examine chronological issues, cultural dynamics at inter-regional scale, rituals and burial patterns related to these funerary structures. The beliefs and ideologies that possibly connected the "kurgan people" over such a wide geographical area, as well as past and present theoretical frameworks, will also be discussed.

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  • Leiden

    Scholarship, prize and job offer - Psyche

    Post-doctorate researcher – The psychology of the ancient world: cognition, social psychology, emotions

    Anchoring Work Package B

    The concept that is central in “Anchoring Innovation” is “anchoring”, connecting what is perceived as new to what is deemed already familiar. “Anchoring” has a substantial social-psychological component. It may depend on the way in which relevant social groups categorize conceptually and linguistically what they perceive as new; it relates to the way in which new input (of whichever nature) is processed cognitively, including what emotional reactions such input elicits; and to the way in which “the new” fits into the value systems of such groups (this includes the ways in which they relate to the past).

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  • Utrecht

    Scholarship, prize and job offer - Prehistory and Antiquity

    Post-doctorate researcher in Coinage in Ancient Greece

    Anchoring Work Package 4

    The use of minted coins was one of the major innovations in the ancient world of the first millennium BCE. Invented in Lydia in the seventh century, coinage spread rapidly throughout the Greek world, first in the Greek cities in Asia Minor, next to Aegina and Athens and soon to the other cities across the Aegean and Mediterranean area. Before the introduction of minted coins, exchange was largely based on weights of precious metals, in smaller amounts weighed on scales, a practice to which striking fixed weights of metal seems just a small and logical step. Yet the swift success of coinage, evidenced by rapidly increasing number of Greek poleis adopting the new medium, shows that the potential of coins to surpass weighed bullion in practical use for all kinds of transactions was recognised early on.

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  • Nijmegen

    Scholarship, prize and job offer - Prehistory and Antiquity

    Post-doctorate researcher in Anchoring in/of Greek lyric poetry

    Anchoring work package 2

    The Hellenistic scholars canonized a group of nine lyric poets who composed their poetry in the archaic and early classical period (Alcaeus, Alcman, Anacreon, Bachylides, Ibycus, Pindar, Sappho, Simonides, Stesichorus). At least by this period, but probably earlier, they became the standard of Greek lyric compositions or themes in Greek literature, such as love (Sappho), drinking (Anacreon) or praise (Pindar). The aim of this post-doc project is to investigate how these poets relate to earlier or later traditions of Greek literature.

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  • Amsterdam

    Scholarship, prize and job offer - Prehistory and Antiquity

    Post-doctorate researcher in "Roman women: legal changes and finances"

    Anchoring Work Package 4

    The transition from republican to imperial rule is one of the main turning points in the history of the ancient world, which had profound consequences for the lives of Roman men and women. As the first emperor, Augustus anchored his multiple political innovations by presenting them as the restoration of the Roman Republic. As part of this restoration programme he posed as the restorer of traditional Roman moral values, issuing legislation to stimulate marriages within the elite and to curb adultery (the Leges Juliae de maritandis ordinibus and de adulteriis coercendis). The ius trium liberorum, which was part of this legislation, gave women sui iuris with three or more children full legal capacity over their property, thus paving the way for women’s civic engagement and public visibility, for instance as benefactresses in numerous cities of Italy and the provinces.

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  • Nijmegen

    Scholarship, prize and job offer - Language

    Post-doctorate researcher in Anchoring Devices in Ancient Rhetoric

    Anchoring Work Package 1

    Ancient rhetoric offers a number of devices to anchor what is new, unfamiliar, dangerously attractive or perhaps even threatening in what is old, tried and tested, and familiar. Two concepts immediately spring to mind and they will determine the approach of this project. In the first place, loci communes in the sense of clichés, i.e., universal sayings or timeless expressions of moral beliefs commonly shared by people belonging to the same cultural community or society. These can form a background against which a particular new or controversial event or person can be framed in a positive or negative way. The second concept is oratio figurata, the umbrella term for theories and methods for phrasing particular new or controversial messages in acceptable terms, for purposes of safety, decency, or amusement.

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  • Louvain-la-Neuve

    Scholarship, prize and job offer - Middle Ages

    The origin and early development of philosophy in tenth-century al-Andalus: the impact of ill-defined materials and channels of transmission (PhilAnd)

    3 post-doc positions at the Université catholique de Louvain (Belgium) as part of the Advanced ERC project

    “PhilAnd” is a five-year advanced European Research Council project to start in October 2017 at the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL) under the supervision of Prof. Godefroid de Callataÿ. The objective of PhilAnd is to conduct a large-scale exploration of how, and under which form, philosophy appeared for the first time in al-Andalus. At the crossroads of several major lines of enquiries in modern scholarship and in line with recent discoveries having important chronological implications, PhilAnd focuses on the 10th century, a period usually disregarded by historians on the assumption that philosophy as such was not cultivated in the Iberian Peninsula before the 11th-12th centuries. Its originality is also to put emphasis on ‘ill-defined’ materials and channels of transmission, a field which remains largely unexplored. PhilAnd will be conducted in partnership with the Warburg Institute (University of London).

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