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  • Venice

    Call for papers - History

    Waging war and making peace

    European ways of inciting and containing armed conflict, 1648-2020

    The history of Europe is as much about violence and divisions – including religious wars, national clashes and ideological conflicts – as it is about shared cultural, social and economic accomplishments. If war has been such a constant presence in the history unfolding on the continent, the incessant efforts to limit its destructiveness are also an undeniable fact. It was such efforts that eventually led to the birth of Jus ad bellum and, ultimately, laid down the foundations of modern international law. From such a viewpoint, one might even find another definition of what European history might be. Some scholars have suggested that if war has structured a common European space, the containment of violence and the art of peacemaking have constituted ‘Europe’ in thought and practice. 

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  • Budapest

    Call for papers - Sociology

    Violence and film

    The Philosophical Journal of Conflict and Violence is seeking articles dealing with philosophical issues that arise in connection with the depiction of violence in film and television. Violence, real or threatened, drives the plots of many, if not most, of the narratives we watch on the screen. Detectives solve grisly murders, victims seek revenge, teenagers flee slashers, gangsters spray bullets, Kungfu fighters trade punches, and armies clash on the battlefield (or in outer space). While almost everyone claims to wants to reduce the levels of violence in society, movie audiences regularly get an enormous kick out of watching on the screen what we abhor in real life. But not all cinematic violence is meant to titillate. Often the aim is to bring audiences closer to the sickening reality of the mistreatment and abuse suffered by those whose plights might otherwise remain invisible to us. While many worry that exposure to cinematic violence may desensitize us, perhaps it can also serve to awaken our empathy.

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  • Lisbon

    Call for papers - Sociology

    Breaking boundaries: academia, activism and the arts

    The international conference Breaking Boundaries: Academia, Activism and the Arts proposes to bring into focus and critically question common grounds and boundaries between and within the Humanities, political activity and aesthetic production.​At a time when boundaries are simultaneously questioned and reinforced – for example between geographical territories, political states, public and private spheres, gendered bodies, creative media, theory and practice, local and global, human, non-human and post-human – the question of what such frontiers stand for, and how and why they might be transgressed offers itself for and, indeed, urges discussion.

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  • Athens

    Call for papers - Middle Ages

    Transformation, renovation, continuity

    Medieval culture and war conference

    It is an undeniable fact of human history that war has been on many occasions and in many different historical contexts a powerful stimulus for innovations and change in culture, politicals, and thought. During periods of transition warfare had a crucial role in medieval societies. Following previous meetings in Leeds (2016), Lisbon (2017) and Brussels (2018) the 2019 Medieval Culture and War Conference will be held in Athens in the Faculty of History and Archaeology of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (NKUA). The conference will focus on ‘Transformation, Renovation, and Continuity’.

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  • Call for papers - History

    Dissent Versus Conformism in the Nordic, Baltic and Black Sea Areas

    The tenth annual international conference on Nordic and Baltic Studies in Romania

    In the meanwhile, conformism seems to have pervaded larger categories of public in East-Central Europe and beyond and new “illiberal democracies” evolved. A composite of authoritarian leader and godfather have taken the reins of power in the area. Populist parties and movements are on the rise. Resurgent nationalisms are again offered as a substitute to solutions. The refugee crisis lingers on and no common decisions have been adopted within the EU to solve it on the basis of the European values. The EU institutions are in need of reform and decisions on the course of the organization and its future enlargement process are still pending. The conference aims at analyzing two often interrelated phenomena: dissent and conformism.

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  • Prague

    Call for papers - History

    Reshaping the Nation

    Collective Identities and Post-War Violence in Europe 1944–1948

    The conference will analyze the composition of nationalities (who belonged to the national community?), the legitimizing function of nationalism, and its relation to acts of violence at the end of war and to the reshaping of postwar societies. At the same time, we want to address the differences between countries. How did a specific occupation policy in a specific place, with its specific national and racist criteria, influence the “responses” of the occupied society? Is there any evidence of a biological understanding of nationhood? How did competing concepts shape a new understanding of the “nation”—particularly taking into consideration the different political and cultural developments in various nation-states after the war ended? We are interested in papers that touch upon violent acts occurring at the end of World War II and stemming from nationalism as reshaped by previous war experiences.

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  • Budapest

    Call for papers - Modern

    Technology and Armed Forces

    Numéro spécial – Philosophical Journal of Conflict and Violence (Issue 1, Vol. 3)

    This special issue welcomes contributions concerning the philosophical issues raised by the use of existing and emerging military and civilian forms of technologies in armed conflict.

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  • Ypres

    Conference, symposium - History

    To end all wars?

    Geopolitical aftermath and commemorative legacies of the first world war

    Taking worldwide perspectives, this unique and prestigious conference brings together international specialists including Jay Winter, Nicolas Offenstadt, Carole Fink, Stefan Berger, Bruce Scates, Pieter Lagrou, Piet Chielens and many others. They will discuss and reflect upon the consequences of the new geopolitical order that came into being after the First World War, and how that war and its legacy have been remembered up to the present day.

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  • Budapest

    Miscellaneous information - Ethnology, anthropology

    The Philosophical Journal of Conflict and Violence

    Call for Guest-Editors : Volume III, Issue I. 2019

    The Philosophical Journal of Conflict and Violence is looking for a Guest-Editor for its May 2019 issue. Preferred topics are : (1) violence and technology; (2) philosophical perspectives on modern wars; (3) reflections on conflict and violence pertaining to the work of a modern western philosopher. 

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  • Rome

    Call for papers - History

    The European Left and the Jewish question

    Zionism, anti-semitism and the Arab-Israeli conflict (1789-1989)

    The seminar on contemporary history of the Department of social and economic sciences of Sapienza University of Rome will organize a conference that will take place from 13 to 14 December 2018 in Rome titled: “The European Left and the Jewish question: Zionism, anti-Semitism and the Arab-Israeli conflict”. The goal is to explore the relationship between the Left and Jews in the two hundred years’ history of the political left, considering three major themes: the Jewish question as seen by left-wing authors; Anti-Semitism and its representations in left-wing culture; The Arab-Israeli conflict as a node of comparison between the Left and the Jewish question.

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  • Paris

    Conference, symposium - History

    War as Contact Zone in the Nineteenth Century

    The workshop seeks to encourage further debate on the mechanics of encounter and transfer processes in war during the "long nineteenth century" (1789-1914). It wiil also explore how historians working on this subject can use new digital methods and impact case studies to make their findings accessible to the public. The choice of period is informed by this era’s manifold innovations in such fields as communication, mass transport, weaponry, international law and the conduct of war, which have generated fruitful dialogue on the question whether the nineteenth century set the path for a totalitarianisation of warfare or should instead be evaluated on their own terms.

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  • Pau

    Call for papers - Sociology

    Pluralizing perspectives? Truth and Reconciliation in societies emerging from conflict and/or violence

    This is a one-day workshop on the plurality of reconciliation practices in post-conflitc societies.  What various meanings are assigned to the word ‘reconciliation’ in the different communities where such initiatives have been implemented? How may conflicting interests or views be reconciled? The organisers also wish to study the influence of historical factors, and assess how the accounts of those seeking reconciliation have evolved over time. An analysis of past initiatives will also be relevant. Finally, a distinction between nationally and locally devised initiatives may be made to better assess the policies implemented, their sustainability, and their impact on the local communities. This is a cross-disciplinary workshop and submissions by researchers in Humanities or Political and Social Sciences will be welcome.

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  • Sibiu

    Call for papers - Modern

    Instances of power and cultural discourse

    Intercultural exchange in the age of globalization, second edition

    In the context of today’s social, political and economic changes, power is one of the governing principles of culture. Power comes in many shapes and sizes and it manifests itself under various forms: it can be tyrannical or a combination of forces (Foucault); it can be charismatic, traditional and rational (Weber) or the opposite – manipulative; it can also appear as a system of diluted forces that spring from the “social field” (Bourdieu); it can remain in the unconscious or it can manifest itself in the speech act. However it may appear, it has become clear that power shapes the course of the creation, interpretation and analysis of literary texts and other cultural products.

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  • Geneva

    Call for papers - History

    Divided memories, shared memories: Poland, Russia, Ukraine

    History mirrored in literature and cinema

    In Central and Eastern European countries, memorial questions appeared right after the demise of the communist regimes in 1989–1991, revealing long-denied processes. The phenomenon of the rise of repressed memories along with the rewriting of history, and the political uses of the past are noticeable in Poland, Russia, and Ukraine, three countries whose histories are as often shared as their memories are divided. The “memory wars” in which these three states have sometimes been engaged since the end of the 1980s have been the subject of an abundant historiography.

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  • Rome

    Call for papers - Religion

    The effects of World War I on the christian churches

    11 November 1918 saw the end of the First World War, known at the time as the “Great War” (1914-1918) for its global scale, extreme destructivity and unseen casualty rates. On the one hand, wars evoke heroism and patriotism and bring people and groups to alter their mental boundaries and abilities. On the other hand, wars also elicit hatred, envy and violent behaviour, the settling of hidden accounts, the abandonment of ethical standards, and deep divisions and confrontations between families and societies. Since effects of the first world conflict were enormous and the shock waves were felt for years and generations to come, the question arises about the impact of the Great War on religion and the established churches.

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  • Oslo

    Conference, symposium - History

    Peacemaking and the Restraint of Violence in Medieval Europe (1100-1300)

    Practices, Actors and Behaviour

    In high medieval Europe, conflict took a number of different forms, from large-scale battles, such as disputes over crowns, power and lands, to more local disputes over inheritance and property. In the absence of well-developed administrative structures which could limit conflict, cultural conventions, rituals and behavioural norms evolved to moderate violence within the elite community.

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  • Call for papers - Ethnology, anthropology

    Violence and conflict in sports and games

    “Philosophical Journal of Conflict and Violence” - Special Issue on Sport and Game Studies

    The Philosophical Journal of Conflict and Violence (PJCV) welcomes contributions concerning philosophical issues raised by sports and games. The selected articles will be published open access by Trivent Publishing in December 2018. Deadline for paper submission is May 1, 2018.

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  • Paris

    Conference, symposium - History

    Destroying Cultural Heritage in Syria (2011-2017)

    Les différents intervenants reviendront sur les destructions et déprédations de nombreux sites archéologiques et institutions muséales en Syrie intervenues depuis 2011, ainsi que sur les méthodes et moyens de documentation et d'inventaire développés et mis en œuvre pour sauvegarder ce patrimoine archéologique en péril.

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  • Call for papers - History

    War as contact zone in the nineteenth century

    We now know more than ever before about the multilayered webs of entanglement that connect army and society, as well as the way in which soldiers and civilians experience violence. Work in this vein has shown that instead of being an exceptional state, war has been implicated in some of history’s most far-reaching changes, such as the evolution of the modern idea of citizenship.

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  • Paris

    Conference, symposium - History

    Home as a place for anti-Jewish persecution in European cities, 1933-1945

    Anti-Jewish persecution didn’t only happen in specifically designed or transformed spaces such as camps and ghettos. It invaded spaces of everyday life in European cities: public spaces, work places and private spaces such as homes. In this landscape not only Jews and agents of persecution appear but also their immediate residential environment: concierges, neighbors, nannies, landlords, property managers, sub-tenants, local administrations, etc. These figures have an essential place in the memories of Jewish survivors. Though, so far, scholars have hardly addressed their role. The spatial turn that occurred during the last fifteen years in Anglophone Holocaust studies focused on the symbolic places of genocide. It mostly neglected apartment blocks and ordinary cities as spaces of persecution. This conference thus intends to focus on urban housing as a place for anti-Jewish persecution.

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