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  • Lisbon

    Call for papers - History

    African Ivories

    In the Atlantic World, 1400-1900

    Since April 2015, the international team working on the project “African Ivories in the Atlantic World: a reassessment of Luso-African ivories” (Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia: PTDC/EPH-PAT/1810/2014), composed of 27 researchers from the University of Lisbon, the University of Évora and the Federal University of Minas Gerais in Brazil, has been researching the trade, circulation and production of raw and carved African ivory in the Atlantic area from the fifteenth to the eighteenth century. The team has identified and listed objects from Portuguese and Brazilian (Minas Gerais) collections, also collecting references and descriptions extant in written Portuguese sources. For the first time a selection of ivory pieces was subjected to lab tests with a view to helping establish their age and origin. The project research team has submitted proposals for re-interpreting material culture in the framework of its African contexts of production. 

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  • Lisbon

    Call for papers - History

    Insularities and enclaves in colonial and post-colonial circumstances

    Crossings, conflicts and identitarian constructions (15th - 21st centuries)

    Historically, archipelagos were considered as rehearsal spaces for new social constructions. Since colonization and, afterwards, colonialism and imperialism, many of them evolved in association with the strengthening of international networks, while others did not escape isolation and forced unequal integration in different spaces. On the other hand, enclaves were the outcome of historical circumstances, often externally decided, which prompted some degree of insularity regarding the immediate geographical surroundings. When those territories did not become independent, there were demands for autonomy or, at least, some underlying emancipatory and anti-colonialist feelings. Even when these feelings did not mobilize relevant segments of the population, they disclose the alterity – above all cultural – in regard to sovereignty.

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