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  • Granada

    Summer School - Representation

    Islamic heritage in Europe

    Over the past decades, there has been a growing interest among scholars in analysing how the Islamic heritage in Europe has been perceived, described, preserved, erased, negotiated or transformed in different areas of Europe, from medieval to modern times. However, those debates seldom crossed the borders of regional approaches. The aim of this training school is to discuss those issues from different and complementary perspectives, including art history, but also philosophy, history of science or anthropology, and to question the traditional regional narrative through a comparative examination of Islamic monuments in a wider Mediterranean perspective.

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  • Call for papers - Early modern

    “Muta poesis, pictura loquens” – Mute poetry, speaking picture

    12th international conference of the Society for Emblem Studies

    Taking as motto “Muta poesis, pictura loquens” (Mute poetry, speaking picture), the Latin version of “Muda Poesia 1, Pintura que fala”, the 12th International Conference of the Society for emblem Studies will take place in Coimbra (Portugal), from Monday 22 June to Saturday 27 June, 2020. The conference will cover the entire universe of emblem studies and papers on every aspect of emblematics are welcome.

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  • London

    Study days - Europe

    Global Social History: Class and Social Transformation in World History

    This conference interweaves global and social history, exploring global social history as a new field of historical inquiry. The papers aim to demonstrate that we cannot understand the emergence and transformation of social groups across the modern world, such as the aristocracy, the economic bourgeoisie, the educated middle classes, or the peasantry, without considering the impact of global entanglements on class formation.

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  • Poitiers

    Call for papers - History

    Colonisations, revolutions, and reinventions in early America and the Atlantic World 1600-1848

    8th biannual conference of the European Early American Studies Association

    This call for papers invites established scholars, post-doctoral students and graduate students to re-examine the fundamental concept of Atlantic history in light of current research on the themes of colonisations, revolutions, and reinventions, from 1600 to 1848. It is also an opportunity to examine the history of transformations in early America and, broadly, the early modern world, by taking fuller account of scholarship on the politics of primitive globalisation. We will focus on the empires that organised European settlements in disrupting and dislocating native peoples, prompting indigenous cultures to re-invent themselves; but we will  also be attentive to the processes that led to the formation of new Euro-American societies in the Americas, often shaped by the enslavement of Africans and other forms of unfree labor. In the North-American colonies, the West Indies, India, Latin America, and Africa, entire peoples and their lands were reinvented by trading companies, individual administrators, theoreticians and executors of empires, as well as by those rare voices, many of who were abolitionists, who developed a critical approach to European expansion abroad.

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  • Monopoli

    Summer School - Language

    Pathos. Forms and fortunes of literary emotions

    The goal of this summer school is to explore the role of emotions in literature, namely with respect to the excess of pathos in different forms and times. Pathos has been a fundamental aspect of literature in every epoch. Great poetry has always foregrounded its ability to represent feelings, evoke intense and vivid moods, and elicit readers’ emotions and empathy. On the other hand, the novel – the genre dominating literary modernity – has been o!en accused of indulging in sentimental excess, giving too much space to melodramatic expression. Indeed, in Western cultures, there is a widespread suspicion towards pathos, which has o!en been identified as a shortcoming of literature. Great books – according to a common implicit assumption – can prompt reflection and laughter, but not tears: pathos only concerns lowbrow production. The summer school is an opportunity to engage in a reflection on issues related to pathos in literature in the last few centuries. Different perspectives will be taken into account: specific literary works, reader response theory, cognitive narratology, transmedia adaptation, and publishing history.

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  • Turin

    Summer School - History

    Rethinking the Baroque (XVII and XVIII centuries)

    New historical and critical perspectives

    The Fondazione 1563 per l'Arte e la Cultura della Compagnia di San Paolo invites scholars who are younger than 40, active in the disciplines of history, art history, architecture and literature and who hold a Ph.D., a certificate of specialization, a 2nd level master’s, or are enrolled in the second year of such study courses to apply to participate in the Summer School Rethinking the Baroque (XVII and XVIII centuries). New historical andcritical perspectives. The courses of the Summer School will all be taught in Italian. The participation in the Summer School is free.

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  • Call for papers - History

    Cross-disciplinary approaches to the study of knowledge-making in the early modern world (1450–1800)

    Following the successful conference held in October 2017 in London and funded by the London Arts and Humanities Partnership, the organisers would like to extend a formative call for publications in preparation to propose a special issue on cross-disciplinarity and forms of knowledge in the early modern world (1450–1800).

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  • Florence

    Summer School - History

    Theories, methodology and case studies

    Summer school in global and transnational History

    The Department of History and Civilization at the European University Institute (EUI) is happy to announce its fifteenth Summer School in Global and Transnational History, which will take place in September 2019 in the historic Villa Salviati, looking out over the hills of Florence. The Summer School will combine discussion of methodological issues in global, transnational and comparative history with case studies by leading specialists from the European University Institute and other major universities. The structure will consist on general introductions and discussions about the new emerging fields of environmental history, guest lectures and reading groups. Contributions on the specific theme of 'Reconceptualizing the past in the age of climate change (1500 to present)’ are now welcome.

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  • Dundee

    Call for papers - History

    International Postgraduate Port and Maritime Studies Network Annual Conference

    Established in 2016, the International Postgraduate Port and Maritime Studies Network brings together postgraduates working on port and maritime studies across a wide range of chronologies and geographies. The network is supported by the Centre for Port and Maritime History, a collaborative venture between The University of Liverpool, Liverpool John Moores University, and Merseyside Maritime Museum, which facilitates research on port cities and their relationship to maritime endeavour and enterprise. Our network is currently comprised of postgraduates from universities in the Basque Country, Crete, Hamburg and New South Wales, as well as from various institutions across the UK.

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  • Oxford

    Call for papers - History

    Music and Late Medieval European Court Cultures

    Late medieval European court cultures have traditionally been studied from a mono-disciplinary and national(ist) perspective. This has obscured much of the interplay of cultural performances that informed “courtly life”. Recent work by medievalists has routinely challenged this, but disciplinary boundaries remain strong. The MALMECC project therefore has been exploring late medieval court cultures and the role of sounds and music in courtly life across Europe in a transdisciplinary, team-based approach that brings together art history, general history, literary history, and music history. Team members explore the potential of transdisciplinary work by focusing on discrete subprojects within the chronological boundaries 1280-1450 linked to each other through shared research axes, e.g., the social condition of ecclesiastic(s at) courts, the transgenerational and transdynastic networks generated by genetic lineage and marriage, the performativity of courtly artefacts and physical as well as social spaces, and the social, linguistic and geographic mobility of court(ier)s.

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  • Call for papers - Religion

    On the Crossroads of Modernity. New Perspectives on religion, culture and society since 1750

    The Research Network on Christian Churches, Culture and Society (CCSCE) is a network of individual researchers that focuses on historical research on the interaction of religion, culture and society in Europe from the second half of the 18th century until present. CCSCE stimulates innovatives themes and approaches and transnational perpectives. It aims to develop a durable and multidisciplinary research community on the subject, involving both senior and promising young scholars.

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  • Târgovişte

    Call for papers - History

    The Romanian Journal for Baltic and Nordic Studies

    Vol. 11, issues 1 and 2 (2019)

    The Romanian Journal for Baltic and Nordic Studies calls for submission of articles in all fields which are intertwined with the aims of The Romanian Association for Baltic and Nordic Studies such as: history of Baltic and Nordic Europe; Baltic and Nordic Europe in International Relations; Baltic and Nordic Cultures and Civilizations; economics and societies of Baltic and Nordic Europe; relations between Romania and the Baltic and Nordic Europe.

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  • Call for papers - History

    The paths of humanism: professional mobility and cultural expansion during the Renaissance

    Diasporas. Circulations, migrations, histoire

    The history of humanism during the Renaissance is one of an international cultural circulation which saw the rise of “humanities studies”, born in north-central Italy at the turn of the fifteenth century, and which came to dominate other models for a large part of the Western élite during the next two centuries. If the exchange of letters and books was surely an important vector in the development of this movement, it is also important to consider this phenomenon in light of mobility, particularly the professional mobility of the learned adherents of these scholarly practices, by creating a dialogue between intellectual and social history.  

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  • Frankfurt

    Scholarship, prize and job offer - History

    Governance of the Universal Church after the Council of Trent – Two PhD positions - Max Planck Research Group

    The Max Planck Research Group III investigates the emergence and development of the system of post-Tridentine global governance of the Catholic Church in depth from an interdisciplinary perspective over an extended period of time. It will do so by analysing the activity of the Congregations of the Council, the dicastery responsible for appropriately implementing the Council decisions in the entire Catholic world.  We are now looking to recruit as soon as possible (but no later than 1 April 2019) two doctoral students who will develop a doctoral thesis preferably focused on the history of the Congregation of the Council in the early modern period (XVI-XVIII century).

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  • Call for papers - History

    Leonardo and Antiquity

    Conference at Hadrian's Villa

    To mark the five hundredth anniversary of Leonardo da Vinci’s death, the “Istituto Autonomo Villa Adriana e Villa d’Este - Villae” (Tivoli, Rome) is organizing a conference with the theme of: “Leonardo and Antiquity”, at Hadrian’s Villa. At the dawn of the 16th century, Leonardo da Vinci visited Villa Adriana, then known as “old Tivoli”. The conference in preparation intends to explore ways in which this journey influenced Leonardo's genius, also in the context of the time period and work of Leonardo's contemporaries and/or disciples. In the company of internationally recognized keynote speakers, the conference welcomes the participation of both Italian and foreign researchers and scholars who answer this call for papers, as a major focus of the conference will be to place Leonardo's trip to Tivoli within a broader cultural context. The deadline for the paper proposals is fixed at January 25th, 2019.

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  • Brussels

    Call for papers - History

    Identity, citizenship and legal history

    XXVth Annual Forum of Young Legal Historians

    The conference continues the long-standing tradition of the Association of Young Legal Historians of providing a general meeting spot for young scholars working on the history of law. It seeks to transcend communal boundaries to further research and to stimulate the exchange of ideas. Ever since her foundation twenty-five years ago the Association has been able to attract a loyal and returning group of young scholars from many countries across Europe and the wider world. In 2019, it is our honour to welcome you to Brussels.

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  • Call for papers - Early modern

    Construction Techniques and Writings on Architecture in Renaissance and Early Modern Europe

    Thematic issue of the journal Opus Incertum (Florence University Press)

    The 2020 issue of the open access journal Opus Incertum (Florence University Press) aims to examine, through selected case studies, the complex relationship between construction practices and architectural writings in Renaissance and early modern Europe. Situated at the crossroads of several disciplines (architectural history, history of science and technology, history of literature), the subject can be approached from different perspectives. To begin with, confrontations of texts on construction techniques with the material realities of extant buildings may reveal, for specific contexts, to what extent these texts operated as vehicles for the transmission of technical know-how, and how much weight they gave to topoi borrowed from ancient authors. 

     

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  • Prague

    Call for papers - History

    Theologies of revolution

    Medieval to Modern Europe

    Modern researchers still struggle to balance emic and etic explanations of revolutionary action, yet at least since the XIVth century, movements and thinkers began to arise which clearly defined their violent, revolutionary action in theological terms, or terms in which the “religious” and “political” are not clearly separate spheres of existence. Such movements built and innovated upon existing understandings of matters like the human condition and history, the perfectability of the world, and the human relationship with God, to not merely legitimize violent action (post facto), but to motivate, guide, and inform it along the way. Our workshop aims to discuss and elaborate upon these and other themes related to revolution from the medieval to the modern periods in Europe, west and east. We hope to address the implications of re-opening historical debate on revolutions which take seriously the input of political-religion.

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  • Rome

    Call for papers - Language

    Cultural mobility around Shakespeare's Rome

    Mapping race and nation through performance

    This seminar asks participants to consider the implications of race or nation on stage, on screen, and in installations, happenings, or other performance venues in Shakespeare’s Roman plays and how perceptions of race shift in different venues, at different historical moments, and even from person to person.

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  • Summer School - Early modern

    Summer Course for the Study of the Arts in Flanders The Age of Bruegel in Context

    Summer Course for the Study of the Arts in Flanders

    Annually, the Summer Course brings a select group of 18 national and international, highly qualified young researchers to Flanders. They are offered an intensive 11-day programme of lectures, discussions, and visits related to a specific art historical period of Flemish art. The Summer Course provides the participants with a clear insight into the Flemish art collections from the period at hand, as well as into the current state of research on the topic.The 5th edition of the Summer Course will focus on ‘The Age of Bruegel in Context’. It will be held from June 23 until July 3, 2019. Excursions will be made to Antwerp, Bruges, Genk, Leuven, Mechelen and Brussels. We are also planning a trip to Paris. The language of the Summer Course is English.

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