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  • Créteil

    Conference, symposium - America

    The Return of the Rust Belt and the Populist Moment

    This conference considers the “Rust Belt” through various thematic, methodological and disciplinary angles. The Rust Belt is a rather loose name for the deindustrialized region around the Great Lakes, encompassing all or parts of the states of Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, West Virginia, Pennsylvania as well as several northwestern counties of New York state.

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  • Shanghai

    Summer School - Political studies

    The governance of socio-ecological systems

    Exploring the land-ocean continuum: coastal zones, river deltas, islands and wetlands

    East China Normal University is hosting a Summer School on the Governance of Socio-Ecological Systems (SES), which is a rapidly emerging issue in many environment related disciplines and especially sustainability science. The GOSES Summer School is organized together with the University of Reims and SENSE (Netherlands Research School for Socio-Economic and Natural Sciences of the Environment).

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  • Budapest

    Call for papers - Sociology

    Violence and film

    The Philosophical Journal of Conflict and Violence is seeking articles dealing with philosophical issues that arise in connection with the depiction of violence in film and television. Violence, real or threatened, drives the plots of many, if not most, of the narratives we watch on the screen. Detectives solve grisly murders, victims seek revenge, teenagers flee slashers, gangsters spray bullets, Kungfu fighters trade punches, and armies clash on the battlefield (or in outer space). While almost everyone claims to wants to reduce the levels of violence in society, movie audiences regularly get an enormous kick out of watching on the screen what we abhor in real life. But not all cinematic violence is meant to titillate. Often the aim is to bring audiences closer to the sickening reality of the mistreatment and abuse suffered by those whose plights might otherwise remain invisible to us. While many worry that exposure to cinematic violence may desensitize us, perhaps it can also serve to awaken our empathy.

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  • Ghent

    Call for papers - History

    Blasphemy and Violence. Interdependencies since 1760

    Liberas (Ghent, Belgium) in conjunction with the School of History, Religion and Philosophy at Oxford Brookes University (Oxford, United Kingdom) and the Leibniz Institute of European History (Mainz, Germany) announce a Call for Papers for a conference and subsequent edited volume on the subject of blasphemy and violence since 1760. Contributions are invited for a conference to be held at Liberas in Ghent. Papers delivered at this conference will be expected to be nearing completion with a view to subsequent publication in the second volume of ‘New Perspectives on the History of Liberalism and Freethought’ in early 2021, a new peer-reviewed open access series published by De Gruyter Oldenbourg.

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  • Warsaw

    Call for papers - Political studies

    1989’s contested legacies

    The challenging of ideological, institutional and (geo)political heritage

    This conference aims at rethinking the legacy of 1989 in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) through the prism of its ongoing contestations, with a focus on the current trends and deliberate political efforts that challenge the major achievements of Velvet Revolutions as well as the outcomes of the collapse of the Iron Curtain. 1989 launched a process that continues to this day. Three decades of transformations, crises and setbacks have noticeably changed the shape of Central and Eastern European societies.

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  • Paris

    Conference, symposium - Sociology

    Antibio-addicts? Defining and governing antimicrobial resistance in the age of One Health

    The power of antimicrobials is now weakened. Since the “magic bullets” have been introduced in medicine and agriculture in the late 1940s, numerous warnings about the problem of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) have been relayed by international agencies, political leaders, scientists and medical practitioners, or various NGOs. These concerns have highlighted the extent and great diversity of antimicrobial use in a world that has proved to be “antibio-addicted”. Recently the AMR problem seems to have been institutionalized and framed in innovative forms.

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  • Lisbon

    Call for papers - Thought

    Fields of collaboration in contemporary art practices

    Can all art be considered collaborative? What has motivated so many artists, in recent decades, to organize in collectives and participate in collaborative projects? Does collaboration in the arts play a major role in redefining the art world and in the production of new subjectivities? How do collaborative art practices challenge the myths of creative genius and artistic individuality?

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  • Call for papers - History

    Cross-disciplinary approaches to the study of knowledge-making in the early modern world (1450–1800)

    Following the successful conference held in October 2017 in London and funded by the London Arts and Humanities Partnership, the organisers would like to extend a formative call for publications in preparation to propose a special issue on cross-disciplinarity and forms of knowledge in the early modern world (1450–1800).

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  • Paris

    Study days - Sociology

    Risk, Violence, and Collective Agency

    This colloquium will assemble a multidisciplinary group of literary scholars, philosophers, sociologists and historians to explore the interrelation of concepts of risk, violence, and collective agency. Participants will do so in a number of literary, historical and geographical contexts, such as Rimbaud’s or Zola’s Paris, Dostoevsky’s or Mandelstam’s Russia, or the 16th century French religious wars and the Armenian genocide. Conversations will engage the critical and philosophical work of Hobbes, Goethe, Arendt, Berlin, Derrida or Balibar. What is at stake is how theories of risk and collective agency might reveal new ways of understanding not only acts of violence or massacre, nihilism and collective political affect, collective will and democracy, or totalitarianism and genocide, but also the complexities of their aesthetic, literary, historiographical or sociological representations.

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  • Dublin

    Call for papers - Political studies

    Identities and Identifications: Politicized Uses of Collective Identities (8th Edition)

    Identity is one of the crown jewelries in the kingdom of ‘contested concepts’. Few concepts are so integral to social assumptions, beliefs and claims of belonging while simultaneously escaping a clear definition or even a minimal consensus. The idea of identity is conceived to provide some unity and recognition while it also exists by separation and differentiation. From personal to group and collective identities, multiple layers of identifications juxtapose conflict or exclude. Few concepts were used as much as identity for contradictory purposes. From the fragile individual identities as self-solidifying frameworks, to layered in-group identifications in families, orders, organizations, religions, ethnic groups, regions, nation-states, supra-national entities or any other social entities, the idea of identity always shows up in the core of debates and makes everything either too dangerously simple or too complicated. Constructivist and de-constructivist strategies have led to the same result: the eternal return of the topic. Some say we should drop the concept, some say we should keep it and refine it, some say we should look at it in a dynamic fashion while some say it’s the reason for resistance to change. In the meantime, identities are programmatically asserted and promoted to generate cohesion and demand recognition while the process of identification excludes and creates boundaries and alterity making practices.

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  • Call for papers - Political studies

    8th PhD conference on international development

    This PhD conference is a student-led initiative. It will offer an international platform for exchange with fellow doctoral researchers, senior academics, and experts. The conference will include two keynote lectures, parallel sessions, a guided poster walk, lunch, refreshments and one conference dinner.

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  • Lisbon

    Call for papers - Sociology

    Breaking boundaries: academia, activism and the arts

    The international conference Breaking Boundaries: Academia, Activism and the Arts proposes to bring into focus and critically question common grounds and boundaries between and within the Humanities, political activity and aesthetic production.​At a time when boundaries are simultaneously questioned and reinforced – for example between geographical territories, political states, public and private spheres, gendered bodies, creative media, theory and practice, local and global, human, non-human and post-human – the question of what such frontiers stand for, and how and why they might be transgressed offers itself for and, indeed, urges discussion.

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  • Dublin

    Call for papers - Political studies

    Europe inside-out

    Europe and Europeanness exposed to plural observers (9th Edition)

    The 9th International Conference ‘Europe Inside-Out: Europe and Europeanness Exposed to Plural Observers’ aims exactly to refresh a broader approach and understanding of Europe by enlarging the platform of regular conferences and workshops for a wider arena of participants and disciplinary backgrounds in order to put on stage a worldwide monadology for such concerns. The conference aims also to enable critical alternatives to the disciplinary orthodoxies by creating a framework for interaction and dissemination of diversity that has to become once more a European trademark.

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  • Leuven

    Call for papers - Education

    Islamic Schools in Europe

    Many Muslim organizations, local mosques and associations establish formal or informal, private and publicly funded extra-curricular Islamic classes in order to transmit Islamic culture and tradition to their next generation. In addition to these extra-curricular Islamic activities organized by local associations and mosques, the opening of Islamic schools diversifies and strengthens this transmission of Islamic tradition and faith for Muslims in Europe in various countries. The aim of this conference is to present an overview of private and publicly funded Islamic schools in Europe and more specifically to understand a comparative analysis of these schools, their education system and the government policies related to the Islamic schools.

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  • Call for papers - Education

    School and national identities in French-speaking Africa

    Political choices, means of transmission and appropriation

    This volume on schools and national identities in French-speaking Africa will be published in the Routledge series “Perspectives on Education in Africa”. The aim of this volume is to provide an in-depth and transdisciplinary understanding of the role of school in the various processes of identity-building, and to showcase research from and about countries outside the former British empire, either as individual case studies or through a comparative framework within or beyond the continent. It will include contributions focusing on the multiple and changing role of schools in the construction of collective identities and the (re)production of national imaginings in francophone Africa. It will also consider how different actors (media, diasporas, social networks, religious communities) shape the appropriation, formulation and implementation of curriculums and discourses about education.

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  • Berlin

    Call for papers - Sociology

    Solidarity at Work

    The term “solidarity” seems to have fallen out of theoretical fashion despite the fact that it has a long history of describing the shared struggles of those oppressed by economic or political power structures. This conference aims to explore the past, present and future of “solidarity at work” on both the conceptual and empirical level. Its focus is on the world of work, which it wants to investigate from a transnational perspective. How have the concepts, conceptions and categories of solidarity shaped labor and the labor movements of different countries? What about the divergent conceptual meanings and practices in these assorted contexts? How have power relations as well as people’s everyday life been changed by the various practices related to solidarity? How do technological and managerial changes help to shift ideas and practices of solidarity? Do we see new forms emerging? Who are the agents of “solidarity at work” and what are the concrete mechanisms involved? More broadly, what are the levers and brakes of solidarity in the workplace today?

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  • Guildford

    Call for papers - Representation

    Dispossession: Agency, ecology and theatrical reality

    TaPRA Theatre, Performance and Philosophy Working Group

    In Ursula Le Guin’s 1974 novel The Dispossessed: An Ambiguous Utopia, children are educated to engage only with what interests others; the opposite is considered self-indulgence, condemned as “egoizing”. The disowning of any idea of the self is considered a virtue, as is the ability to speak the language of others. Le Guin’s novel fictionalises a common narrative in processes of 20th and early 21st century art: the withdrawal of the self. In relation to concurrent processes that reclaim agency for those who are already dispossessed, that call for the legitimisation of systematically marginalised voices, is the withdrawal of the self merely a privilege? How might wilful dispossession and agency be related through difference, as interconnected transitions of power, in such a way that reveals theatricality in the construction of reality?

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  • Portsmouth

    Miscellaneous information - Representation

    Magic, exits/endings and water: How does performance escape?

    In this day-long event at the University of Portsmouth, the Theatre, Performance and Philosophy Working Group and the Applied and Social Theatre Working Group come together to interrogate how an exit from today’s crisis of reality might be envisioned and conjured through performance.  

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  • Ghent

    Call for papers - Geography

    What does carceral geography bring to carceral studies?

    19th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology : convergent roads, bridges and new pathways in criminology

    The term ‘carceral geography’ describes a vibrant field of geographical and space-centred research into practices and institutions of incarceration, ranging from prisons to migrant detention facilities and beyond. Although rapid, its development is far outpaced by the expansion, diversification and proliferation of those strategies of spatial control and coercion towards which it is attuned. The dictionary definition of carceral is ‘relating to, or of prison’, but as Routley notes ‘carceral geography is not just a fancier name for the geography of prisons’. Carceral geography is in close dialogue with longer-standing academic engagements with the carceral, most notably criminology and prison sociology. Dialogue initially comprised learning and borrowing from criminology, but within a more general criminological engagement with spaces and landscapes  recent years have seen criminologists increasingly considering and adopting perspectives from carceral geography.

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  • Prague

    Call for papers - Modern

    Working all night

    Modernity, night shifts and the temporal organization of labour across political and economic regimes

    Issues we would like contributors to address in the workshop are: How did the temporal organization of labour and the night shift evolve in different places and different times? How has the night shift been perceived and ‘lived’ by workers who have engaged in this activity? Who are, and were, the workers involved in night work? To what extent has the ‘night shift’ been carried out by specific groups and/or categories (such as unskilled workers, women, migrants, etc). To what extent has the night shift been seen as compatible or clashing with with key social, human and labour rights?  How has night work been legitimized, contested, and negotiated by different stakeholders at all levels of the economic hierarchy?  And, what are the threats to well-being of night workers due to lack of regulations to night work (in global cities)?

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