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HomeSubjectsPeriodsEarly modern




  • Conference, symposium - Representation

    (Re)Ordering the Gods. The Mythographic Web through Times

    Names and epithets, historical facts, rituals and monuments, textual fragments, plants and places: these are samples of the wide material that the mythographic tradition deals with. How do we organise it? What data to choose, how to present it and what for? This online workshop organised at the Warburg Institute will question the different forms of mythographic compilation.

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  • Odense

    Call for papers - Early modern

    Settling Sophonisba

    Rediscovering a lost figure in the early modern European imagination

    Early modern European dramatists, poets, and painters took a striking interest in the Carthaginian noblewoman Sophonisba (c.235-203 BC) who chose to poison herself to avoid the humiliation of becoming a Roman captive. A minor character in Roman and Greek historical sources such as Livy’s Ab urbe condita, Plutarch’s Life of Scipio, and Appian’s Punic Wars, Sophonisba became a popular heroic figure in early modern Europe across national and confessional borders. Why did a seemingly insignificant Carthaginian noblewoman such as Sophonisba become such a popular figure across early modern culture? And what did she come to signify in different early modern contexts? This theme issue is dedicated to this enigmatic figure and her many different appearances in early modern literature and art.

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  • Call for papers - History

    Arabists and Hebraists (18th - 20th century)

    Hamsa Journal of Judaic and Islamic Studies

    Looking for new contributions about the theme within the universe of Arabic and Hebraic studies, the next volume of HAMSA will be dedicated to the topic Arabists and Hebraists (18th -20th century). It is intended to summon up Arabists and Hebraists whose activity was developed inside or outside the Academy, also encompassing those who work in a solitary way or in non-traditional more and less ephemeral groups, or alternative networks. The chronological range extends from the 18th to the 20th century, allowing the inclusion of the beginning of modern Arabic and Hebraic studies, in Europe, Middle East and new American states, as also others less obvious regions of the world.

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  • Paris

    Conference, symposium - Early modern

    Imaginary places, real territories

    Territorial imagery and the creation of Dutch identities (1579-1702)

    From the creation of a federal State in 1579 to the temporary disappearance of the Stadholderate in 1702, what role did the visual culture play in the political assertion of a national territory? How does the artist’s gaze on the territory, local or foreign, real or imagined, allows us to understand this rhetoric? How exactly are fantasized or real elements of foreign places integrated in a local visual discourse? What do these images reveal of the public who commissions, buys and looks at them? Within the process of national and territorial construction, how are these territorial perspectives integrated and part of the enrichment of the Dutch identity narrative? Considering the variety of these issues, this symposium aims to shed light on the ways in which Dutch depictions of national and transnational territories participated in the formulation of a shared identity.

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  • Study days - History

    Imperial Material

    Napoleon’s Legacy in Culture, Art, and Heritage, 1821–2021

    Napoleon Bonaparte died exactly two hundred years ago on a small island in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. He had spent the last six years of his life in exile on St Helena, removed from political and military power, in the unusual situation of being able to try to shape and preserve his own posthumous legacy. He was, in a way, phenomenally successful. Napoleon is an instantly recognisable name to this day, and despite growing efforts in recent years to critically revise his reputation and highlight his role in issues such as the reinstatement of slavery, he has largely managed to escape the same level of historical censure as other infamous military dictators. This is perhaps partly because his name has become such an adaptable brand, standing for an entire era of people, places, and events, as well as a full two centuries’ worth of art, craft, and consumer commodities. While other events marking the bicentenary of Napoleon’s death have weighed his contributions to legislative, political, and military reform, less work has been done to confront his vast material, visual, and cultural legacy. This workshop therefore brings together researchers and museum and heritage professionals to reflect on the enduring material and visual legacy of Napoleon, what our interpretation and use of it means for the future, as well as how it affects our understanding of the past.

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  • Dublin

    Call for papers - Early modern

    Terra universalis. New perspectives on Early-Modern first globalization.

    2021 The Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting

    For several years, the new concept of space that emerged between the end of the 15th and during the 16th century has been the object of study by several disciplines. Besides well-known works by historians of science, contributions by epistemologists and historians of geography analysed the genesis of both the concept of universal Earth – i.e. the representation and conception of the word as a unity – and new perspectives on art and science.

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  • Call for papers - History

    The legacy of the arts: ideas and representations

    The transmission of knowledge through tradition, orality and Academia

    The second edition of the conference on doctoral studies in art and musicology aims to focus on research on the transmission of knowledge through the arts as a means and source of knowledge in the art world. The images and musical documents that have been preserved from ancient times to the present day - throughout the world - have made it possible to understand aspects of the social, cultural and religious life of many civilizations and also to be the same reflection of these. In this way, Art and Music, as resources, have been one of the key elements to be able to understand a culture since it has been the mechanism through which humans have been able to capture and transmit ideas and knowledge.

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  • Tivoli

    Call for papers - History

    The garden of the gods

    The paradigm of antiquity in the arts at the Villa

    The establishment of humanistic culture in Italy led to one of the richest seasons in Villa architecture and a profound process of transformation of the idea and the function of the garden, in which antiquity was the absolute protagonist. The roots of this development date back to the second half of the fifteenth century, as is clearly demonstrated by Leon Battista Alberti, in the preface to his De re aedificatoria: "Our Ancestors have left us many and various Arts tending to the Pleasure and Conveniency of Life".

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  • Vilnius

    Call for papers - Europe

    Theatrum Libri: The Press, Reading and Dissemination in Early Modern Europe

    The conference is dedicated to 15-19th century printed books and manuscripts.We invite scholars from various disciplines to reflect on and share their new research, methods and applications, including the application of digital humanities and open data in research of the book: the 15-19th century book as an archival phenomenon (accumulation of knowledge and books) in Lithuania and Europe; the role of knowledge accumulators and book collectors, systematizers and sorters in forming a personal or institutional archive; the materiality of the book and its various elements (book marks, structure, parts, details, a title page, covers, inscriptions, typography, illustrations, vignettes, decorative elements, etc.) as a means of generating ideas, tool for creating a narrative or result of historical circumstances; book economics: market and business strategies (prices, book fairs, catalogs, advertising, and reviews); applying digital technology and interactive, unique tools for data storage and use.

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  • Call for papers - Early modern

    Contagion. Knowledge, Practices and Experiences from the Late Middle Ages to the Twenty- First Century

    «Genesis. Journal of the Italian Society of Women Historians», 1/2022

    We encourage proposals for papers based on original research in a long time span (from the Late Middle Ages to the present), on Italian, European and non-Western geo-political contexts. The history of epidemics and pandemics is an ever-growing and broad research field. Therefore, we have chosen to focus our analysis on issues of intersectionality, i.e. on the ways in which disease has historically been represented, treated and experienced through the lens of class, gender and race, so as to shed light on connections and tensions that at times exacerbated these differences. The intersectional dimension of contagion is one aspect of various asymmetries of power. We encourage contributors to approach power dynamics not through the simple binary opposition command/subalternity, but alert to the mediation and circulation occurring within specific contexts. Traditions of knowledge, too, are part of such circulation, which stimulates hybridity and cross- fertilization. This is a crucial aspect of our research agenda.

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  • Lausanne

    Call for papers - History

    Celebrating the Illustrious in Europe (1580-1750)

    Towards a New Paradigm?

    The aim of this study day is therefore to review all the biographical productions of a period that has been little considered until now, in order to better understand how the modes of celebrating the glory of illustrious men were transformed between 1580 and 1750, both in writing and in images, by taking into account various media such as books, prints, paintings, sculptures and even medals.

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  • Call for papers - History

    New Outlooks on the Napoleonic Empire

    Young Napoleonists’ Conference in the Bicentenary of Napoleon’s Death (1821-2021)

    Since the 1990s, the multifaceted political and social transformation started by the Napoleonic era (1799-1815) has gained increasing scholarly attention; even if these studies have, for the most part, focused on the changes that took place within the Napoleonic Europe, the scope continues to broaden toward a global-scale geography. The same is true for the angles of research from which the period can be examined: recently, historians have started to deal not only with such classic issues as military or political history, but also to address the diverse range of questions posed by the interdisciplinary study of empires. It is only fair that, as the bicentenary of Napoleon’s death (1769-1821) approaches, we seize the chance to showcase and discuss the research that young historians are pursuing on the Napoleonic legacy and its impact on the existing order. 

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  • Leuven

    Conference, symposium - History

    Language in the Global History of Knowledge

    This workshop discusses various ways in which language and the study of language figured in the global history of knowledge, from the 16th to the early 20th century. In the expanding network of mercantile, missionary, and colonial relations, language was both a vessel and a barrier for the transmission of knowledge. Moreover, languages became an object of knowledge and theory-formation in themselves, in ways that diverged from how their speakers knew their language and their world. Our aim is to address the interrelations between these different kinds of knowledge. The emergence of the language sciences has to be understood both in relation to traditions of textual scholarship within different cultures, and to developments in other fields of science (broadly understood).

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  • Paris

    Conference, symposium - Early modern

    Picturing the Margings

    Peripheries, Minorities and Taboos in the Films by Marcel Łoziński, Pál Schiffer and Želimir Žilnik

    The conference aims to study films directed by three acclaimed Central European and Balkanic documentary filmmakers who showed, through their filmic poetics, a special interest towards disqualified social groups. In parallel to the conference, multiple events will be held online: screenings, debates, masterclasses with Marcel Łoziński and Želimir Žilnik, tribute to Pál Schiffer, etc.

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  • Trier

    Scholarship, prize and job offer - Early modern

    PhD positions for the ERC projet “Pamphlets and Patrons”

    The purpose of this research project is to develop new perspectives on the emergence of modern politics, and to contribute to a re-evaluation of Ancien Régime society and to help re-assessing the origins of the French Revolution. We aim especially at developing a new way to look at the rise of the public sphere in the 18th century and at re-evaluating the political role of court nobility. The focus is on the impact of patronage by courtiers on politics in general and on pamphlets in particular. PAPA’s main hypotheses are that a) courtiers shaped the 18th-century public sphere in a crucial way, b) 18th-century society and politics show more continuities than ruptures to the 17th century, and c) the French Revolution had at its inception much more in common with 17th-century princely uprisings than has been hitherto recognised.

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  • Pisa

    Summer School - History

    Latitudes of the body

    Human-Based Measurement and its Contexts, from Leonardo to Newton (1400-1700)

    While strongly rooted in the Center for the study of medicine and the body in the Renaissance (CSMBR) intellectual history tradition, the summer school will present and discuss a variety of verbal and non-verbal sources (e.g. manuscripts, images, music pieces, and artefacts) in a multidisciplinary approach that aims at attracting and welcoming scholars with different backgrounds, interests and expertise.

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  • Florence

    Call for papers - History

    Scandalous Feasts and Holy Meals

    Food in Medieval and Early Modern Societies (12th-18th centuries)

    The researcher-led Visual and Material History Working Group of the European University Institute in Florence invites participants to a one-day conference on the visual and material culture of the history of food in medieval and early modern societies. We welcome proposals covering any aspect of food history, from the twelfth to the eighteenth century. Papers should discuss the methodology and the perspectives brought by the use of objects and visual representations as source material. We aim for this conference to reach beyond the bounds of historical scholarship and therefore warmly welcome papers from the fields of history of art and archaeology.

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  • Call for papers - History

    Or­din­ary Or­al­it­ies: Every­day Voices in His­tory

    Histories of voice are often written as accounts of greatness: great statesmen, notable rebels, grands discours, and famous exceptional speakers and singers populate our shelves. This focus on the great and exceptional has not only led to disproportionate attention to a small subset of historical actors (powerful, white, western men and the occasional token woman), but also obscures the broad range of vocal practices that have informed, co-created and given meaning to human lives and interactions in the past. The volume aims toward geographical and chronological breadth, from any region of the globe, from roughly the seventeenth to the twentieth century. Contributors to this volume seek out spaces and moments that have been documented idiosyncratically or with difficulty, and where the voice and its sounds can be of particular salience.

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  • Amsterdam

    Call for papers - History

    The Morisco Diaspora and Morisco Networks across the Western and Eastern Mediterranean

    This workshop aims to bring together scholars who work on the migrations (forced and non-forced) of Muslims from the Iberian Peninsula to other parts of Europe and the MENA Region between the fall of Granada (1492) and the first half of the seventeenth century.

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  • Florence

    Summer School - History

    What is European History in the 21st Century?

    Summer School in Global and Transnational History

    The Department of History and Civilization at the European University Institute (EUI) is happy to announce its seventeenth Summer School in Global and Transnational History, which will take place online on 14-16 September 2021. This year, the Summer School would like to invite contributions on the specific theme of What is European History in the 21st Century?

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