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HomeSubjectsZones and regionsEuropeBritish and Irish Isles




  • Reims

    Call for papers - Representation

    Retrophilia, Nostalgia, and the End of Pop Culture

    The purpose of this publication is to question and re-evaluate Simon Reynold’s 2011 statement that “We live in a pop age gone loco for retro and crazy for commemoration. […] Could it be that the greatest danger to the future of our music culture is … its past?” One decade after Reynolds’s thought-provoking analysis, one may wonder whether this assumption is still relevant today. Can it be extended to other objects of pop culture (films, series, music, video-games, tatoo art, etc.)? In the Post-pandemic age, is pop culture still fixated on its (and our) past? Is this “addiction” to the past a regressive trend or, on the contrary, an opportunity to reassess modern history and re-evaluate its legacy and its representation in popular mass media? In terms of forms and formats, can something “radically new” emerge from nostalgia?

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  • Oxford

    Seminar - Epistemology and methodology

    Channels of Digital Scholarship

    The general aim of the seminar/discussion, is an exchange of information about the different offerings of our various institutions in the field of digital humanities/scholarship training. Particular matters of interest that have been identified are: the curriculum of each course, how it evolved, and why; if there is a particular emphasis for each course (practical, theoretical, &c.); the make-up and background of the student body for each course, and how students are selected; what the prospects and possibilities might be for students going on from the course, in the sense of career directions, and whether trends might be emergent about where they want or are tending to go, once they have finished their course.

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  • Essen

    Call for papers - Early modern

    Conviviality and Sociability in the Long Eighteenth Century: Restoration to Romanticism

    Christoph Heyl (Univ. Duisburg-Essen) and Rémy Duthille (Univ. Bordeaux-Montaigne) are continuing the long tradition of the Landau-Paris Symposia on the Eighteenth Century, welcoming both established scholars of the field and early career researchers. The symposium focuses on the literature and culture of the British Isles of the period, but it is also open to topics relating to the British colonies, France, Germany, and further afield. The conference will include a panel of emerging scholars who are working on their PhD projects or are planning to begin a PhD project in the near future.

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  • Durham

    Conference, symposium - Thought

    Time at the Turn of the Twentieth Century in American-British Philosophy

    Around the turn of the twentieth century, time became a major focus of American-British philosophy. Against a broadly Kantian-Hegelian backdrop, philosophers began developing new questions and theories about time. Shadworth Hodgson argued humans perceive a ‘specious present’, a short duration rather than an infinitesimally small one; this view was further developed by Mary Calkins and William James. J. M. E. McTaggart advanced a new argument for the unreality of time. A. N. Whitehead made time the foundation of his process philosophy. This event brings together philosophers from Europe and North America exploring this period that was to become defining for the contours of twentieth-century English-speaking philosophy of time. The event will deliberately be scheduled to be compatible with European and North American time zones.

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  • Villeneuve-d'Ascq

    Call for papers - Urban studies

    Territorial fractures, ruptures, discontinuities and borders: issues for planners

    The French-British Study Planning Group / Groupe franco-britannique de recherche en aménagement et urbanisme, has worked for 20 years on the building of networks and intellectual bridges between the communities of planning research and practice on both sides of the Channel. Since 2005 it has been formally constituted as a sub-group of the Association of European Schools of Planning (AESOP). The potential retreat of the current United Kingdom from the European Union presents a new context and it is natural that the group should turn its attention to the territorial impacts which could arise as a result. It is also an occasion to reflect more widely on all forms of territorial discontinuities, ruptures and borders, including those at the national, regional and local scales, and which are of concern to planning research and practice.

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  • Nantes

    Call for papers - Language

    Networking May Sinclair

    This international conference explores the diversity of connections, inspirations and influences in the work of modernist writer, May Sinclair (1863-1946). It will be held at the University of Nantes (France) on Thursday 18th and Friday 19th June 2019.

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  • Grenoble

    Call for papers - Political studies

    Mobilizing Voters in the United States and the United Kingdom: political strategies from parties and grassroots organizations (1867 – 2017)

    Following two different and yet complementary approaches (one from the top down with parties and the other from the bottom up with grassroots organizations), we propose to compare how potential voters have been appealed to, through the use of different strategies and tools of communication”. Whether it be organizations or parties, it will be interesting to analyze how these groups either (re)connect citizens with politics or give birth to social movements which durably occupy the political landscape of the United States and the United Kingdom. Common features may be observed along with distinct approaches particularly adapted to the specificity of each country concerned.

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  • Call for papers - Europe

    What do we see, what do we hear in Ken Loach's Kes (1969)?

    The conference on Kes is, to begin with, an opportunity to look at and listen to what is registered in this remarkable film by Ken Loach, made fifty years ago. To the question “What do we see, what do we hear in Kes?”, the answers should not be anachronistic. The intention is to take in, from a variety of angles and approaches, what is shown and made audible here: a community of women, men, children, their lives woven into, both propped up and confined by, the institutional nexus of component places, home, workplace, school, public house, and component times, early morning, Friday night. What animates Ken Loach’s picture of a mining community are the tensions evident in the sights and sounds through which the modest story of Billy Casper is conveyed, a story affording access to the lives of people as they play out, in occasional and sometimes irreversible conflict with other lives.

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  • Paris

    Study days - Representation

    Biological Perspectives in 21st century Literature and Performance

    New Scales

    In 2019 and 2020, the Sorbonne Nouvelle “science and literature” group will continue to explore the biological imagination in contemporary arts. We are delighted to invite you to two symposiums on Biological Perspectives in 21st-century Literature and Performance : “New Scales”, on June 7th 2019 “New Images”, on June 12th 2020.

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  • Call for papers - History

    Ireland, the Revolution and the First World War

    Continuities, ruptures and legacies (1913-1919)

    We are pleased to host, at the Centre Culturel Irlandais de Paris, an international conference on Ireland and the First World War as part of the national commemorations for the Centenary of the First World War.

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  • Malakoff

    Study days - Law

    Third International Student Symposium on the History of Crime

    The International Symposium on the History of Crime is a forum for international university students to explore the understanding of issues surrounding the history of crime. The annual symposium was created to bring together doctoral, masters, and undergraduate students as well as early career academics in a friendly academic environment that facilitates discussion around history of crime issues. This Third edition will be attended by students and academics from the USA, UK and France. The symposium is deliberately broad in reach and we make every effort to draw together wide and diverse topics in order that contributors feel encouraged to participate and present their research in-progress as well as engaging and informative short papers.

     

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  • Nanterre

    Call for papers - Europe

    English journeys past and present, explorations of the condition of England

    The conference will address the following hypothesis: the illustration of a certain  way of being English, of a specific English way of inhabiting and making sense of the world, were given definition and cultural force through a series of writings which record the impressions of things seen in the course of a journey dedicated to the exploration of a territory, whether the land of England  in its national extension or the more local territory of a particular community. The organizers are calling for papers which will examine a corpus of writing  proposing a first-person observations of a condition of England at various moments in the history of a territory. 

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  • London

    Conference, symposium - Europe

    Stages of Utopia and Dissent, 50 years on...

    15 May 1968: the Odeon theatre in Paris is occupied by students and becomes the insurgent headquarters where every night militants recount the days' action in occupied factories to an audience of people camping in the auditorium. Youth rebellion was never as mythologised as that of the French students’ fight against institutional oppression. The effects were felt across the Channel, too – but the nature of those effects was, and remains, disputed. 50 years on… where are we? What remains of autogestion and emancipatory education? What remains of theatre inventiveness and sedition? What remains of a need for participatory audiences? What remains of utopia and dissent?

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  • Paris

    Study days - Language

    Christianity, language contact, language change

    The present workshop addresses questions of language contact and language change, as well as language standardization in the Christian context both in Europe and in the New World (Americas, Africa) through a study of diachronic and synchronic corpora. Special attention is paid, on the one hand, to the role of translation as a sight of language contact, and on the other hand, to register variation as an indicator of differential propagation of innovations appeared in Christian context.

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  • Coventry

    Call for papers - Modern

    Between and Beyond

    Transnational Networks and the British Empire (Ca. 18-20th centuries)

    This workshop intends to bring together research scholars of history and affiliated fields working on transnational networks fostered through the British Empire. We wish to focus on how certain forms of the “empire”, the “colony”, and the “outside” mutually constituted each other. Such an approach, we believe, could illumine the dense transnational convergences that shape the political, the economic, the social, and the cultural in various locations simultaneously. 

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  • Heidelberg

    Conference, symposium - Europe

    The Roll in Western Europe in the Late Middle Ages

    Rolls were used in all aspects of medieval society. Key areas in which rolls were utilized include administration, genealogies, poetry, liturgy and heraldry. Despite the significance of the roll as a form for medieval writing culture, it has not received as much attention in respect to its significance. The international conference The Roll in Western Europe in the Late Middle Ages focuses on the materiality and the praxeology of late medieval rolls (1200 – 1500), particularly in England and France. The presentations deal with questions regarding the purpose and function of the rolls, the advantages and disadvantages of the roll form and why it was preferred for certain texts over other forms, such as the codex.

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  • Oslo

    Call for papers - History

    Peacemaking and the Restraint of Violence in Medieval Europe (1100-1300)

    Practices, Actors and Behaviour

    In high medieval Europe, conflict took a number of different forms, from large-scale battles, such as disputes over crowns, power and lands, to more local disputes over inheritance and property. In the absence of well-developed administrative structures which could limit conflict, cultural conventions, rituals and behavioural norms evolved to moderate violence within the elite community.

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  • Dijon

    Call for papers - Thought

    “Literary Offenses” and Other Contentious Matter

    This one-day conference will address the subject of controversial or polemical texts such as reviews, essays, letters, prefaces and/or postfaces published between 1800 and 1900 in Britain and the United States. It seeks to open fresh approaches to controversies or polemics by focusing on literature and the literary aspects of these questions. Indeed, if controversy can be defined as a debate between two or more parties with different viewpoints before an audience, studies have mainly come from the fields of social sciences and science studies, with some interest in rhetoric and/or argumentation. However, literary controversies are as important as scientific ones for the constitution of the public, democratic debate as it was shaped in Britain and in the U.S. in the nineteenth century. Controversies and polemics contributed to legitimizing some literary genres; they gave publicity to new or avant-garde authors; they redefined the content and contours of the public debate.

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  • Montpellier

    Conference, symposium - Political studies

    Neoliberalism in the Anglophone World

    This conference aims at presenting a critical overview of issues related to neoliberalism in the Anglophone world. It will be broad in scope by covering British, American and the other English-speaking areas, as well as the fields of civilisation, literature and linguistics, while maintaining a thematic focus on the concept of neoliberalism from international and interdisciplinary perspectives.

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  • Rennes

    Study days - Europe

    Industrial Heritage in the UK

    Mutations, Conversions and Representations

    The chosen perspective for this one-day conference is an inter- and pluri-disciplinary one and it is therefore articulated around a variety of approaches such as cultural geography, cultural history, art history, media studies, urban studies, heritage studies, architecture, etc.

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