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Merchants, jurists and other "intermediate groups" in Early Modern Southern Europe

Mercaderes, juristas y otros "grupos intermedios" en el sur de Europa y en el espacio atlántico, siglos XVI-XVIII

Grupos Intermédios no Sul da Europa, séculos XVI-XVIII

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Publié le mardi 20 janvier 2015 par João Fernandes

Résumé

Merchants, farmers, jurists, clerks in large institutions, secretaries, independent landowners, local elites and highly sought master craftsmen, among many others, are individuals with an ambiguous social status. Looking at who was not born exactly noble, nor exactly commoner, but stood on the border between one world and the other, is one of the goals of this initiative. As part of a project developed in Portugal focusing on the Holy Office’s familiaturas, it will be held on September 16 and 17, 2015, a workshop at Escuela Española de Historia and Archaeological in Rome. Our aim is to select a total of 8 applicants, that will be joined by 4 guest speakers, for a joint reflection on the dynamics and profiles of ‘intermediate groups’, as well as on the methodologies for their study in Early Modern Times.

Annonce

Argument

Merchants, farmers, jurists, clerks in large institutions, secretaries, independent landowners, local elites and highly sought master craftsmen, among many others, are individuals with an ambiguous social status. Looking at who was not born exactly noble, nor exactly commoner, but stood on the border between one world and the other, is one of the goals of this initiative.

The so-called ‘intermediate groups’ often appear in researches on mobility processes. And, although that may be an interesting means to approach and study the problem, it is surely not the only one. We can walk other paths, and try to find out, for instance, how did those groups got to that level. What kind of factors (if any) differentiated them? Does it make any sense to speak of ‘intermediate groups’ in colonial Ibero-America? Is it eventually possible to draw their profile? How did they socially interact? In the Iberian Peninsula, many of their presumed members enjoyed prestigious places in religious organizations or were familiares of the Inquisition. What other types of social distinctions did they get? Similar strata seem to have existed throughout southern Europe. What features did they present?

As part of a project developed in Portugal focusing on the Holy Office’s familiaturas, it will be held on September 16 and 17, 2015, a workshop at Escuela Española de Historia and Archaeological in Rome. Our aim is to select a total of 8 applicants, that will be joined by 4 guest speakers, for a joint reflection on the dynamics and profiles of ‘intermediate groups’, as well as on the methodologies for their study in Early Modern Times.

Submission guidelines

If you are interested in this theme and some or all of the above related issues, please send a title, an A4 page summary and a brief CV to cidehus@uevora.pt ,

until February 15, 2015.

Working languages

Spanish, Italian and English.

Organization

  • project PTDC/HIS-HIS/118227/2010 – FCT, Portugal;
  • COMPETE/QREN/FEDER - FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-020722

Lieux

  • Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma - Via di Torre Argentina, 18
    Rome, Italie

Dates

  • dimanche 15 février 2015

Mots-clés

  • merchants, jurists, intermediate groups, early modern, Southern Europe

Contacts

  • Vaz Freire Madalena
    courriel : mvfreire [at] uevora [dot] pt

Source de l'information

  • Vaz Freire Maria Madalena
    courriel : mvfreire [at] uevora [dot] pt

Pour citer cette annonce

« Merchants, jurists and other "intermediate groups" in Early Modern Southern Europe », Appel à contribution, Calenda, Publié le mardi 20 janvier 2015, http://calenda.org/314546