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Published on Wednesday, September 21, 2022 by Lucie Choupaut

Summary

One of the characteristics of the development of the movement of philosophy for children has been the variety of perspectives and practices that have grown from it over the decade. The aim of this symposium is to tackle this diversity of perspectives and practices in philosophy for children in its relationship to ethics education. In sum, how these different perspectives permit or limit ethics education of children and teenagers? The Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children (IAPC) calls for papers that explore how various theoretical and practical perspective on the practice of philosophy in schools fosters students’ ethics learning. We invite to submit papers using a philosophical, theoretical or empirical lens. Accepted papers will be presented at the IAPC special symposium of the 2023 American Philosophical Association, Eastern Division Annual Meeting.

Announcement

2023 American Philosophical Association, Eastern Division Annual Meeting January 4-7, 2023, Montreal, QC, Canada 

Special Symposium of the Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children, Session G2C: Wednesday, 4 January 2023, 2:00 – 5:50 PM 

Symposium Chair and Proceedings Editor

Olivier Michaud, Université du Québec à Rimouski 

Overview

Various connections have been made between children’s philosophical practice and ethics education (Gregory, 2013, 2014; Lipman, 1987; Lipman, Laverty & Park, 2004; Lipman & Sharp, 1989; Matthews, 1987, 1990; Sasseville & Gagnon, 2020; Sharp, 1995). Ethical notions such as freedom, justice, person, and courage are philosophical notions that can be inquired into philosophically. These notions are tackled in a specific way in a philosophy session. Hence, one of the central tenets of the larger movement of philosophy of children has been that philosophy session should not be used to transmit specific notions regarding moral ideas or values, but rather to create a space where children can think together on ethical issues, with the help of the teacher whose role is to ensure that they use their critical, creative and caring taking (Gregory et al., 2008; Lipman et al., 1980; Sasseville, 2009; Topping et al., 2019). As such, students learning regarding ethics is not only about the concepts that are the subject of the inquiry, but also about a way to treat these concepts and, even, how to treat each other. Furthermore, philosophical dialogue is also linked to ethics because students are called by experiencing it to reflect on the kind of person they want to be and the kind of life they will like to live. 

One of the characteristics of the development of the movement of philosophy for children has been the variety of perspectives and practices that have grown from it over the decade. The aim of this symposium is to tackle this diversity of perspectives and practices in philosophy for children in its relationship to ethics education. In sum, how these different perspectives permit or limit ethics education of children and teenagers? 

The Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children (IAPC) calls for papers that explore how various theoretical and practical perspective on the practice of philosophy in schools fosters students’ ethics learning. Here are examples of angles that could be taken to tackle this subject: 

  • theoretical discussion on the meaning of doing philosophy in schools. For instance, can and to which point critical pedagogy should inform philosophy for children. (Chetty, 2018; Kohan, 2018; Michaud, 2020)? 
  • Reflection on the ways to envision dialogue in a philosophy session. For example, what can be gained in regard of ethics education by practicing story circle (Fletcher et al., 2021) ? 
  • Analysis of how more traditional philosophical sessions could be linked to other pedagogical methods. For instance, what can bring the association of philosophy children to project-based instruction or direct instruction (Gagnon & Yergeau, 2016)? 

We invite to submit papers using a philosophical, theoretical or empirical lens. Accepted papers will be presented at the IAPC special symposium of the 2023 American Philosophical Association, Eastern Division Annual Meeting, with the larger goal of compiling the papers into a book or a special issue in a philosophy for children journal. 

Submission guidelines

Authors should send an abstract (abt. 300 words) in MS Word (.doc or .docx) to Dr. Michaud (olivier_michaud@uqar.ca)

by 15 October 2022.

Authors will be notified of their acceptance via email by 1 November 2022. 

Paper submission : Authors of accepted abstracts are expected to submit full papers to Dr. Michaud (olivier_michaud@uqar.ca) by 4 February 2022. Papers should include a word count and a 150-word abstract (not counted in total word count) on the title page. 

Presentation: Presenters will be required to pay the conference registration fee, and APA members are encouraged to maintain their APA memberships. APA members are also encouraged to submit papers to the main program, in addition to participating in this group session. 

Question: Questions or comments may be directed to Dr. Michaud at Université du Québec à Rimouski: olivier_michaud@uqar.ca. 

Important dates

  • Abstract Submission –15 October 2022 
  • Acceptance Notification – 1 November 2022 
  • IAPC Symposium at APA Annual Meeting ‒ 4 January 2023, 2:00 – 3:50 PM 
  • Full-length Paper Submission – 4 February 2022 

Scientific committee

  • Maughn Gregory, Professor, Educational Foundations, Montclair State University, New Jersey, United States
  • Olivier Michaud, Professeur, fondements de l'éducation, Université du Québec à Rimouski, Québec, Canada

References

Chetty, D. (2018). Racism as ‘reasonableness’: Philosophy for Children and the gated community of inquiry. Ethics and Education, 13(1), 39-54. 

Fletcher, N. M., Gregory, M. R., Shea, P., & Sykes, A. (2021). The story circle as a practice of democratic, critical inquiry. childhood & philosophy, 17, 01-42. https://doi.org/doi: 10.12957/childphilo.2021.53655 

Gagnon, M., & Yergeau, S. (2016). La pratique du dialogue philosophique au secondaire : vers une dialogique entre théories et pratiques. Presses de l'Université Laval. 

Gregory, M. (2013). Wisdom and Other Aims for Precollege Philosophy Education. In M. Glina (Ed.), Philosophy For, With, and Of Children. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. 

Gregory, M. (2014). Ethics education as philosophical practice: The case from socratic, critical and contemplative pedagogies. Teaching Ethics, 15(1), 19-34. 

Gregory, M., Brubaker, N., Burdick, S., Cevallos-Estarellas, P., Heinegg, J., Jackson, T. E., Kennedy, D., Laverty, M., Lipman, M., Perry, A., Sharp, A. M., Splitter, L., Turgeon, W., & Williams, M. J. (2008). Philosophy for Children: Practitioner handbook. Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children. 

Kohan, W. O. (2018, June 5 2018). Paulo Freire and Philosophy for Children: A critical dialogue. Studies in Philosophy & Education, 37, 615-629. 

Lipman, M. (1987) Ethical Reasoning and the Craft of Moral Practice. The Journal of Moral Education 16(2): 139-147. 

Lipman, M., Laverty, M. & Park, J. (2004) A Philosophy for Children Base for a Moral Education Program in Korea. Ethics Studies [Korea] 55(4): 377-399. 

Lipman, M. & Sharp, A.M. (1989) How Are Values to be Taught? Ethics in Education 9(2): 2-3. 

Lipman, M., Sharp, A. M., & Oscanyan, F. S. (1980). Philosophy in the classroom (2d ed.). Temple University Press. 

Matthews, G.B. (1987) Concept Formation and Moral Development. In J. Russell (ed.) Philosophical Perspectives on Developmental Psychology, pp. 175-90. Oxford: Blackwell. 

Matthews, G.B. (1990) Moral Development and Religious Education. In A. Tannenbaum (ed.) Studies in Jewish Education, v. 5, pp. 150-66. Jerusalem: Hebrew University. 

Michaud, O. (2020). What kind of citizen is philosophy for children educating? What kind of citizen should it be educating? Philosophical Inquiry in Education, 27(1), 31-45. 

Sasseville, M. (2009). La pratique de la philosophie avec les enfants (3e ed.). Presses de l'Université Laval. 

Sasseville, M., & Gagnon, M. (2020). Penser ensemble à l'école: Des outils pour l’observation d’une communauté de recherche philosophique en action (3 ed.). Presses de l’Université Laval. 

Sharp, A. M. (1995). Philosophy for children and the development of ethical values. Early Child Development and Gare, 107, 44-55. 

Topping, K. J., Trickey, S., & Cleghorn, P. (2019). A teacher's guide to philosophy for children. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group. 

Places

  • Le Centre Sheraton Montreal 1201 René-Lévesque Blvd W
    Montreal, Canada (H3B 2L7)

Event format

Full on-site event


Date(s)

  • Saturday, October 15, 2022

Keywords

  • philosophy, children, ethics, ethics education, community of inquiry

Contact(s)

  • Olivier Michaud
    courriel : olivier_michaud [at] uqar [dot] ca

Information source

  • Olivier Michaud
    courriel : olivier_michaud [at] uqar [dot] ca

To cite this announcement

« The Role of Philosophy in Ethics Education », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Wednesday, September 21, 2022, https://calenda.org/1017278

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