Calenda - Le calendrier des lettres et sciences humaines et sociales

Vous avez dit halal ?

Did you mean halal?

Normativités islamiques, mondialisation et sécularisation

Islamic Normativities, Globalization and Secularization

*  *  *

Publié le mardi 15 janvier 2013 par Loïc Le Pape

Résumé

The study of Islamic normative dynamics will be at the heart of this conference that will focus on ‘halal’ qualification / disqualification processes in all areas: how and by whom, for whom, for what reasons objects, discourses, practices can or are actually called "halal" or "haram"? What methods, institutions, arguments of Islamic legitimation / de-legitimation are used ? What are the procedures for monitoring compliance with the standard and how and by whom are they developed or institutionalized? Proposals may question the issues of qualification and disqualification through objects, practices, behaviours qualified as halal or haram in areas such as: food, matrimonial relationships , sexualities, finance, tourism etc. We will select in priority contributions in the social sciences and humanities, history and law, based on empirical studies, archival research, comparisons and syntheses that take a deconstructive perspective.
L’étude des dynamiques normatives islamiques sera au cœur de ce colloque qui s’intéressera aux processus de qualification / déqualification « halal » dans tous les domaines : comment et par qui, à l’intention de qui, en vertu de quoi, les objets, discours, pratiques peuvent-ils être ou sont-ils qualifiés de « halal » / « haram ». Quels sont les modes, institutions, argumentaires de légitimation / délégitimation islamiques ? Quelles sont les procédures de contrôle de conformité de la norme et comment et par qui sont-elles élaborées voire institutionnalisées ? L’appel à contributions s’adresse aux disciplines des sciences humaines et sociales, notamment l’histoire, l’anthropologie, la sociologie, le droit, les sciences politiques, la philosophie etc. Les contributions devront être étayées empiriquement, elles expliciteront leurs démarches méthodologiques, sources, bibliographies. 

Annonce

Did you mean halal ? Islamic normativities, Globalization and Secularization

Presentation

The Larousse dictionary defines the term "halal" as an adjective describing, "meat of an animal killed according to the Islamic rites that can be consumed by Muslims". This definition reflects the ordinary meaning of that term in a secularised industrial context in which the "halal market" refers mainly to meat for a population defined by religious affiliation. However, over the past years, especially in countries without Muslim tradition, we have witnessed an expansion of this term attached to other products and services offered by Islamic banks and insurance companies (halal credits), sharia-compliant hotels as well as behaviours and institutions (marriage, sexuality, etc.) to the point that "halal", originally qualifier, has become a noun: " the halal". Some see in this proliferation of halal the invisible hand of the market eager to ride on the heritage and values of a multisecular religion. Others detect a religious attempt to recapture a hackneyed concept: as it reaches out and into the ethics of action, halal, according to them, rediscovers its original theological sources. Finally, for a number of political analysts, the extension of the halal domain is, above all, symptomatic of the way European Muslims communities restructure themselves – one could even talk of communitarism – in the early twenty-first century, as they compete for the representation and the control of their communities.

The fact remains that the word halal, having become a noun, implicitly refers to the normative system itself rather than to its sole positive polarity of « permitted ». This contributes to obscure the history of this concept, its construction and its unique genesis. Neither the meat market nor the religious market need deconstruct and historicize the concept in order to expand their sales or their influence: its efficiency actually lies precisely in its opacity. On the contrary, “the halal” must embody qualitative (good, tasty and healthy) or religious properties (good, pure and holy), all of which are relative and subjective attributes. Halal items are in that sense what economists call « credence goods » (Darby and Karni) whose quality cannot be obtained either before or after their acquisition.

Whether ritual killing is considered as a result of the industrial application of religious directives, hereby submitting the market to religious forces, or as an industrial ploy of marketers taking advantage of religious credulity, both interpretations corroborate and reinforce the imaginary tale of the "truth of halal." However, halal is neither purely economic nor purely religious, it is an object negotiated according to different normative dynamics.

To understand the construction of the halal norm (in the sociological sense of the term), it may prove useful to apply the socio-economic theory of conventions. For conventionalists, quality is the result of negotiations between actors, in compliance with norms, rules and institutions beyond the trade relation itself and involving different sized worlds within the context of global uncertainty (Boltanski, Thévenot, Knight).

This conference proposes to welcome contributions whose approach avoids the trap of normative validation, which reduces halal to what it claims to be : merely a religious attribute. Halal products (i.e objects, ideas and behaviours) should, in that perspective, be analysed as the interaction of various actors and institutions within the different frameworks of economic, religious, cultural and expertise markets.

Contributors may regard them as 1) a constituted object 2) an object in constitution or, 3) in relation to their uses.

1. "The halal" as a constituted object

By applying the theory of conventions, the process of making a product halal results from negotiations between producers, consumers and regulators who have different responsibilities in the production, distribution and consumption activities. Considering that the qualities of halal goods can never be objectified, since no individual and no means of traceability can prove its authenticity, how can the belief in halal be sustained? To analyze the construction of a halal domain, one must identify the players, locations, collaborative patterns, recognition practices and the competition that are at work in maintaining the belief and its conditions of emergence far beyond the mere religious field, even though everything seems to point in that direction.

2. "The halal" as an object in constitution

In principle, anything can, at least potentially, be "halalised", but that does not necessarily happen. What are the processes involved in the definition of objects intended to convey, translate and embody the "halal"? How and by whom are these choices among various possibilities made and what rationale is behind the decision’? How to understand the choices and non-choices of certain objects produced and retained as ‘haram’ or as undetermined.

3. The uses of "halal"

Although the products or behaviours are defined by contradistinction between halal and haram, people who consume or use halal do not refer to ‘halalised’, but to ‘religious’ items.

As the halal food market has shown, ‘credence goods ‘ require third instance validation, able to certify the product authenticity. This produces a strategic arena in which various groups (Islamic certifiers, Muslim consumer associations, virtuous associations etc.), compete to define the norm that determines its use and therefore its effectiveness. What normative dynamics are at work to determine not the items, objects and services to be regarded as halal, but their halal use? What is at stake in the process? The control of halal is a financial issue, since it enables some to accumulate the income resulting from Muslim and sharia friendly consumption. But beyond the financial benefits, islamic fashion, a type of Muslim pride consumerism, is also coveted by traditional religious institutions: the challenge of controlling halal standards is thus clearly a political issue in the religious realm. Finally, the control of halal standards, particularly as far as food is concerned, is a godsend for moral entrepreneurs (Becker). The plasticity of halal makes it an ethical stake. When it comes to food, this opens the way to speeches on themes that go far beyond the mere intake of food. Food is good to eat and good for thought (L-Strauss): how is this or that type of food constituted (production processes), how is it distributed and sold (distribution channels), how is it produced (the death of animals), who guarantees its compliance (trust), who controls it (food safety), who prepares it at home (male/female relationships), who eats it (identity), with whom (commensality) etc.?

The study of Islamic normative dynamics will be at the heart of this conference that will focus on ‘halal’ qualification / disqualification processes in all areas: how and by whom, for whom, for what reasons objects, discourses, practices can or are actually called "halal" or "haram"? What methods, institutions, arguments of Islamic legitimation / de-legitimation are used ? What are the procedures for monitoring compliance with the standard and how and by whom are they developed or institutionalized?

Proposals may question the issues of qualification and disqualification through objects, practices, behaviours qualified as halal or haram in areas such as: food, matrimonial relationships , sexualities, finance, tourism etc. We will select in priority contributions in the social sciences and humanities, history and law, based on empirical studies, archival research, comparisons and syntheses that take a deconstructive perspective.

Contributions may, for example, include:

The history of halal markets: communications on the history of the market of halal meat, its birth and development from the last third of the twentieth century and on its prehistory are welcome (Middle East, Australasia).

  • The history of Islamic standards for food, sex, marital relations: analysis of reviews and discursive fatwas concerning slaughtering practices, dietary laws and the commensality with non-Muslims, especially since the end of the nineteenth century in Muslim and non Muslim countries.
  • Halal-haram, Islam, postislamism and consumerism: the Islamic way of life through different expressions of what is called the urban (sub) cultures. The construction of halal in the cultural field: Islamic fashion, exhibitions, consumerism.
  • Halal and free market economies: the role of multinational companies (such as Nestlé) in the definition of the halal norm, as well as the incidence of the theory of free trade on Islamic standards in food, finance etc., especially in in South-East Asia countries (Malaysia, Indonésia, etc.).
  • The halal industry: the role of industrial-economic constraints on the definition of halal, including the issue of stunning before slaughter, ethical conflicts (‘animal welfare’ representations and practices).
  • Halal sciences: standards, knowledge, certification: how the ‘science of halal’ is taken in a dynamic innovation which consists in optimizing returns thanks to new discoveries and the steady expanding of the scope of halal to new product categories (cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, or even household products).
  • Halal policies: legitimacy, representation: control of the reach of halal within community representation strategies implemented by Islamic institutions regarding the organization of local halal markets in ordinary or festive situations (Eid Al Adha).
  • Consumption and collective mobilization: theoretical and methodological contributions that do not directly look at halal quality but might elicit insights on the mechanisms of its attractiveness, mobilization patterns, etc.

Submissions and agenda

We would be happy to welcome contributors from the main disciplines of human and social sciences, notably history, anthropology, sociology, law, political sciences, philosophy etc.

Contributions should be based on empirical evidence and explicitly detail their methodology, sources and bibliography. 

Propositions will be selected on the basis of a text of 2 000 signs max + last name, first name, professional status, institution and e-mail address of each author, to be sent

before 31st January 2013 to :

Responses will be sent to the authors by the 31st March 2013.

  • Date of colloquium : Thursday 7th and Friday 8th November 2013
  • Venue : EHESS Paris (to be precised)

Organization and partners

This colloquium is initiated and organized by Dr Florence Bergeaud-Blackler (LAMC/ULB-IREMAM) with the support of Marie Curie Actions and IISMM. Other partners are : LAS; Marie Curie Actions; LABEXMed (AliMed); IREMAM ; IRENE network.

Publication

Papers selected by the scientific committee will be published in a collective book edited by Karthala/IISMM.

Scientific Committee

  • Mohamed Hocine Benkheira, Directeur d’Etudes at Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes (France)
  • Anne-Marie Brisebarre, Director of Research CNRS at Laboratoire d’Anthropologie Sociale (France) ;
  • Christian Bromberger, Professor of Ethnology at l'université de Provence , member of  l'Institut universitaire de France ;
  • Chantal Crenn, Maitre de conférences en anthropologie sociale, Université Michel de Montaigne à Bordeaux ;
  • Baudouin Dupret, Director of Research CNRS and Directeur of Centre Jacques Berque Rabat (Maroc) ;
  • Khadiyatoulah Fall, Chaire d’enseignement et de recherches interethniques et interculturels de l’Université du Québec à Chicoutimi (Québec) ;
  • Franck Fregosi,  Director of Research,Chargé de cours à l’Institut d’études politiques d’Aix en Provence/Université de Strasbourg ;
  • Bernard Heyberger, Director of Institut d'Etudes de l'Islam et des Sociétés du Monde Musulman-IISMM (France);
  • Rémy Madinier, Co-Director of IISMM Paris; Chargé de Recherche at CNRS (Centre Asie du Sud-Est) (France)
  • Mara Miele, Reader at Cardiff school of Planning and Geography (UK) ;
  • Pierre Petit, Director of Institut de Sociologie at Université Libre de Bruxelles (Belgique) ;
  • Mohamed Tozy, Professor of political sciences at Casablanca université Hassan II (Morocco) and at Aix-en-Provence Institut d’Etudes Politiques (France)

Argumentaire

Le dictionnaire Larousse définit le terme « halal » comme adjectif invariable qualifiant « la viande d'un animal tué selon les rites, et qui peut être consommée par les musulmans »[1]. Cette définition reflète l’acception courante de ce terme dans un contexte sécularisé industriel selon lequel le « marché des produits halal » concerne essentiellement des nourritures carnées destinées à une population définie par son appartenance religieuse. Or, on observe depuis quelques années, et particulièrement dans les pays sans tradition musulmane, un élargissement  sémantique de ce terme accolé à d’autres produits et services commercialisés par les banques et assurances islamiques (crédits halal), les hôtels sharia-compatibles aux prestations garanties halal, mais aussi à des comportements ou des institutions (le mariage, la sexualité, etc.) au point que « halal » de qualificatif devient un substantif : « le halal ». Certains pensent voir dans cette prolifération du halal la main invisible d’un mercantilisme cynique affairé à détourner à son profit le patrimoine et les valeurs d’une religion multiséculaire. D’autres décèlent dans cet élargissement une tentative de réappropriation religieuse d’un concept galvaudé : le halal en s’élargissant à l’éthique de l’action reviendrait à ses sources théologiques premières. Enfin pour nombre d’analystes politiques, l’extension du domaine du halal serait surtout symptomatique d’un mode de structuration communautaire -ou communautariste- des musulmans européens de ce début du XXI°, dans une course à la représentativité et  au contrôle de la communauté.

Il reste qu’ainsi substantivé le halal renvoie implicitement au système normatif lui-même et non plus à sa seule polarité positive de « permis ». Cette substantivation du halal contribue en effet à opacifier l’histoire de ce concept, sa construction et sa genèse singulière. Ni le marché de la viande ni le marché religieux n’ont besoin, pour vendre ou élargir leur influence, de déconstruire et d’historiciser ce concept dont l’efficace tient précisément à son opacité. Bien au contraire, le halal doit incarner des propriétés qualitatives (du bon, du goût, du sain) ou religieuses (du bon, du pur, du saint) qui sont toutes des propriétés relatives et subjectives. Les biens halal constituent  à ce titre ce que les économistes nomment des « biens de croyance » (credence goods[2]) pour lesquels l’information sur la qualité́ des biens ne peut être obtenue ni avant ni après l’acquisition des biens.

Que l’on considère la norme d’abattage halal comme résultant de l’application industrielle de directives religieuses par soumission du marché aux forces religieuses, ou qu’on la voit comme une pure créature industrielle que le marketing imposerait à la crédulité religieuse, voilà deux interprétations qui corroborent et renforcent le récit imaginaire de la « vérité du halal ».  Or le halal n’est ni purement économique ni purement religieux, c’est un objet négocié selon des dynamiques normatives différentes.

Pour comprendre la construction de la norme halal (norme, au sens sociologique du terme), on peut faire utilement appel à la théorie socio-économique des conventions qui s’est affranchie de la théorie économique classique selon laquelle la coordination sur la qualité du produit ne se réalise qu’entre les acteurs de l’échange. Pour les conventionnalistes, la qualité est le fruit de négociations entre des acteurs en vertu de normes, règles et institutions qui dépassent les seuls réseaux marchands et qui font intervenir des mondes de grandeurs différentes dans un univers d’incertitudes (Boltanski, Thévenot, Knight).

Dans cette perspective, cette conférence propose de rassembler des contributions qui, par leur approche, évitent de tomber dans le piège de la validation normative qui réduit le halal à ce qu’il prétend être : une propriété religieuse. Les produits (objets, idées, comportements) qualifiés halal, seront plutôt étudiés comme résultant d’un travail entre différents acteurs, institutions, au sein de différents marchés : marchés économiques, marchés religieux, marché culturel, marché du savoir etc.

On pourra les analyser sous forme 1/ d’objet constitué, 2/ d’objet en constitution et 3/ sous l’angle de leurs usages. 

1. « Le halal » comme objet constitué

Par application de la théorie des conventions, on peut considérer que le travail de qualification halal résulte d’une négociation entre des producteurs, des consommateurs et des régulateurs qui ont des responsabilités différentes dans le processus de production, de distribution et de consommation. Puisque les qualités du bien halal ne peuvent jamais être objectivées, que personne, ni aucun procédé de filature ou de traçabilité ne peut conclure à son authenticité, comment la croyance est-elle maintenue ? Pour analyser la construction d’un domaine du halal,  il faut identifier les protagonistes, les lieux, les logiques collaboratives, de distinctions, de compétition qui sont à l’œuvre dans le maintien de la croyance et ses conditions d’émergence bien au-delà du seul champ religieux même si tout y renvoie.

2. « Le halal » comme objet en constitution

En principe, tout peut, potentiellement du moins, être « halalisé » mais tout ne l’est pas. Quels sont les processus à l’œuvre dans la définition d’objets destinés à véhiculer, traduire et incarner le « halal » ? Par quels acteurs ces choix parmi les possibles sont-ils opérés et selon quelles logiques ? Comment comprendre les choix et les non-choix de certains objets produits et conservés tantôt comme illicites tantôt comme indéterminés.

3. Les usages « du halal »

Bien que les produits ou les comportements halal soient définis par contradistinction du haram, ceux qui consomment ou usent du halal se référent non à des produits halalisés mais à des « choses religieuses ».

Comme le marché des nourritures halal l’a montré, les « biens de croyance » nécessitent une instance de validation tierce apte à certifier  la véracité du produit. Se crée un espace stratégique de lutte pour la définition de la norme qui conditionne son usage et donc son efficacité (certificateurs islamiques, associations de consommateurs musulmans, associations vertueuses etc,). Quelles sont les dynamiques normatives à l’œuvre dans  la détermination non pas des choses, objets et services halal, mais de leur usage ? A quels enjeux ces dynamiques normatives renvoient-elles ?Le contrôle du halal est un enjeu financier, puisqu’il peut permettre d’accumuler les revenus monétaires du consumérisme islamo ou sharia-compatible. Au-delà de l’attrait financier, l’islamic fashion, la muslim pride consumériste est également convoitée par les institutions religieuses traditionnelles : l’enjeu du contrôle des normes halal peut donc constituer un enjeu politique dans le champ religieux. Enfin, le contrôle des standards halal, notamment dans le champ alimentaire est pain bénit pour les entrepreneurs de morale (Becker). La plasticité du halal en fait un enjeu éthique. Dans le domaine de l’alimentation, il permet de discourir sur des thèmes qui vont bien au-delà de la simple ingestion alimentaire. L’aliment est bon à manger et bon à penser (L-Strauss) : comment tel aliment est-il constitué (les processus productifs), par qui (la distribution des moyens de distribution), comment (la mort animale), qui le garantit (la confiance), qui le contrôle (sécurité alimentaire), qui le prépare au foyer (relations hommes/ femmes) qui le mange (l’identité), avec qui le manger (la commensalité) etc ?

L’étude des dynamiques normatives islamiques sera au cœur de cette conférence qui s’intéressera aux processus de qualification/déqualification « halal » dans tous les domaines : comment et par qui, à l’intention de qui, en vertu de quoi, les objets, discours, pratiques peuvent-ils être ou sont-ils qualifiés de « halal »/« haram ». Quels sont les modes, institutions, argumentaires de légitimation/ délégitimation islamiques ? Quelles sont les procédures de contrôle de conformité de la norme et comment et par qui sont-elles élaborées voire institutionnalisées ?

Les propositions pourront s’interroger sur les enjeux de la qualification et de disqualification au travers des objets, pratiques, comportements qualifiés de halal / haram dans des domaines comme : l’alimentation, les relations matrimoniales, les sexualités, la finance, le tourisme  etc. Nous privilégierons les contributions en sciences sociales et humaines, en histoire, en droit,  fondées sur des études empiriques, recherches archivistiques, comparaisons et synthèses qui adoptent une perspective déconstructiviste.

Les contributions pourront, par exemple, porter sur :

L’histoire et la pré-histoire du marché de la nourriture halal : les communications sur l’histoire du marché de viande halal, sa naissance et sa progression à partir du dernier tiers du XX°, sa préhistoire, sont bienvenues (notamment les échanges marchands entre le Moyen Orient et l’Australasie dans la seconde moitié du 20° siècle).

  • L’histoire des normes islamiques relatives à l’alimentation, à la sexualité, aux relations matrimoniales des recensions et analyses discursives des fatwas relatives aux pratiques d’abattage, aux interdits alimentaires, à la commensalité avec des non musulmans, aux liens entre interdits alimentaires et régimes matrimoniaux, sexualité, en particulier depuis la fin du XIX° dans les pays musulmans et non musulmans.
  • Halal- haram, islamisme, postislamisme et consumérisme l’islamic way of life à travers  différentes expressions de ce que l’on appelle les (sous) cultures urbaines. La construction du halal dans le champ culturel : islamic fashion, congrès, foires, exhibitions, etc.
  • Halal et économies libéralisées des contributions sur le rôle des multinationales (comme Nestlé) dans la définition du standard halal, de la théorie du libre-échange sur les normes islamiques dans l’alimentation, sur la finance etc. En particulier dans les pays du Sud-Est asiatique (Malaisie, Indonésie etc.). 
  • L’industrie du halal : des contributions sur le rôle des contraintes économico-industrielles sur la définition du halal, notamment la question de l’étourdissement préalable à l’abattage, les conflits éthiques (représentations et pratiques du « bien-être animal »).
  • Les « sciences du halal » : normes, savoirs, certification comment la « science du halal » est prise dans une dynamique d’innovation consistant à optimiser la rentabilisation des résultats par de nouvelles découvertes en élargissant en permanence le périmètre du halal à d’autres produits, cosmétiques, pharmaceutiques, ou même  produits ménagers.
  • Les politiques du halal : légitimation, représentation le contrôle du champ du halal dans les stratégies de représentation communautaire  des institutions islamiques, dans l’organisation du marché de la viande halal local en situation ordinaire, ou festive (Aîd el Adha).
  • Consommation et mobilisation collective : des contributions théoriques et méthodologiques qui ne portent pas directement sur la « qualité halal » mais pourrait en éclairer les mécanismes d’attraction et de mobilisation etc.

Calendrier récapitulatif, échéances

Cet appel à contributions s’adresse aux disciplines des sciences humaines et sociales, notamment l’histoire, l’anthropologie, la sociologie, le droit, les sciences politiques, la philosophie etc.

Les contributions devront être étayées empiriquement, elles expliciteront leurs démarches méthodologiques, sources, bibliographies.

Les propositions seront sélectionnées sur la base d’une note d’intention de maximum 
2 000 caractères espaces compris + les nom, prénom, statut, rattachement institutionnel et adresse e-mail de chaque auteur.

Ces notes devront être envoyées impérativement avant le 31 janvier 2013 à

Les auteurs seront avisés par mail des propositions retenues avant le 31 Mars 2013.

Date et lieu du colloque : jeudi 7 et vendredi 8 novembre 2013 à l’EHESS, Paris (amphi à préciser)

Publication

Sur avis du comité scientifique certaines communications présentées au colloque seront retenues - éventuellement amendées - et donneront lieu à la publication d’un ouvrage  publié dans la Collection « Terres et gens d’islam » IISMM - Karthala. Les consignes de l’éditeur en vue de cette publication seront données durant ou immédiatement après le colloque.

Partenariat :

Colloque initié et organisé par Florence Bergeaud-Blackler, Marie Curie fellow  LAMC ULB / IREMAM. Avec le soutien de l’Institut d'études de l'Islam et des sociétés du monde musulman  et la participation du Laboratoire d’Anthropologie Sociale ; du LABEXMed ; du réseau IRENE, de l’IREMAM.

Comité scientifique

  • Mohamed Hocine Benkheira, Directeur d’Etudes à l’Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes (France) ;
  • Florence Bergeaud-Blackler , Marie Curie fellow du Laboratoire d’Anthropologie des Mondes Contemporains-ULB (Belgique) /associée à l’Institut de Recherche et d’Etude sur le Monde Arabe et Musulman à Aix en Provence ;
  • Anne-Marie Brisebarre, Directrice de Recherche CNRS au Laboratoire d’Anthropologie Sociale ;
  • Christian Bromberger, Professeur d'ethnologie à l'université de Provence et membre de l'Institut universitaire de France ;
  • Chantal Crenn, Maitre de conférences en anthropologie sociale, Université Michel de Montaigne à Bordeaux ;
  • Baudouin Dupret, Directeur de Recherche CNRS et Directeur du Centre Jacques Berque à Rabat ;
  • Khadiyatoulah Fall,  Titulaire de la Chaire d’enseignement et de recherches interethniques et interculturels de l’Université du Québec à Chicoutimi ;
  • Franck Fregosi,  Directeur de Recherche,Chargé de cours à l’Institut d’études politiques d’Aix en Provence/Université de Strasbourg ;
  • Bernard Heyberger, Directeur de l’Institut d'Etudes de l'Islam et des Sociétés du Monde Musulman-IISMM ;
  • Rémy Madinier, Co-Directeur de l'IISMM Paris; Chargé de Recherche au CNRS Centre Asie du Sud-Est ;
  • Mara Miele, Reader at Cardiff school of Planning and Geography (UK) ;
  • Pierre Petit,  Directeur de l’Institut de Sociologie de l’Université Libre de Bruxelles;
  • Mohamed Tozy, Professeur de sciences politiques à l'université Hassan II de Casablanca (Maroc) et à l'IEP d'Aix-en-Provence.

 

Notes

[1] Le dictionnaire Larousse le définit comme un adjectif : « se dit de la viande d'un animal tué selon les rites, et qui peut être consommée par les musulmans »

[2]  selon les inventeurs de ce concept (Darby et Karni)

Lieux

  • IISMM - 96 Boulevard Raspail
    Paris, France (75006)

Dates

  • jeudi 31 janvier 2013

Fichiers attachés

Mots-clés

  • halal, islam, norms

Contacts

  • Florence Bergeaud-Blackler
    courriel : florence [dot] blackler [at] gmail [dot] com

URLS de référence

Source de l'information

  • Florence Bergeaud-Blackler
    courriel : florence [dot] blackler [at] gmail [dot] com

Pour citer cette annonce

« Vous avez dit halal ? », Appel à contribution, Calenda, Publié le mardi 15 janvier 2013, https://calenda.org/234622

Archiver cette annonce

  • Google Agenda
  • iCal