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Games and languages in higher education - the teaching practices and research journal

Jeux et langues dans l’enseignement supérieur

Recherche et pratiques pédagogiques en langues de spécialité journal - Volume 36, issue 2 - June 2017

Revue « Recherche et pratiques pédagogiques en langues de spécialité » Volume 36 N°2 (juin 2017)

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Published on Tuesday, September 20, 2016 by João Fernandes

Summary

In his work entitled L’anthropologie du geste, Marcel Jousse describes man as an “interactional mimic” ([1974] 2008) who cannot but replay the actions he sees around himself, actions which imprint upon him and which he expresses through replaying them. Man thus constructs his identity, his role by replaying the actions he sees around him. Playing roles allows him to “become the other” and by so doing, to understand and memorise better (Lecoq 1997). As a result, the act of playing (and replaying) a role allows the acquisition of skills and knowledge by bonding with others, because playing requires recognising and adapting to the other’s needs. Finally, playing is a creative process, because replaying is never a simple repetition or holding up of a mirror, but it is a personal and dynamic reaction. It is not a case of a figurative representation of that which we observe and replay, but an acting out of its essence – a dynamic activity.

Announcement

Argument

In his work entitled L’anthropologie du geste, Marcel Jousse describes man as an “interactional mimic” ([1974] 2008) who cannot but replay the actions he sees around himself, actions which imprint upon him and which he expresses through replaying them. Man thus constructs his identity, his role by replaying the actions he sees around him. Playing roles allows him to “become the other” and by so doing, to understand and memorise better (Lecoq 1997). As a result, the act of playing (and replaying) a role allows the acquisition of skills and knowledge by bonding with others, because playing requires recognising and adapting to the other’s needs. Finally, playing is a creative process, because replaying is never a simple repetition or holding up of a mirror, but it is a personal and dynamic reaction. It is not a case of a figurative representation of that which we observe and replay, but an acting out of its essence – a dynamic activity.

Playing (roles) can be a fun, entertaining activity which we could encourage Higher Education students to engage further in the process of language-learning. However, it remains a fundamentally innate behaviour, which is “profoundly anthropological” (ibid). In a similar vein, Berthoz considers that there can be no learning without action because “the origin of thought resides in the necessity of movement” (2009). The links between play and learning are numerous - both are eminently social phenomena which re-place the individual in his or her environment. They allow for the re-presentation of his or her identity and reinforce the role of the body in understanding others. Playing remains marginalised however in the language classroom (Lapaire & Masse 2008; Aden 2008).

How, under these conditions, should we envisage teaching and learning LSP / LAP so as to give playing its due? This is the question which we will be address in this issue of Researching and Teaching Languages for Specific Purposes. The notion of “playing” can be approached from a number of angles (theatre, strategy games, video games, physical games, etc.) as well as its implications in terms of teaching and learning languages (motivation, pleasure, autonomy, memorisation, etc.).

Contributions will adress the question of playing with regards to learning languages in Higher Education. Contributions must follow the journal’s editorial policy (https://apliut.revues.org/1965#tocto2n1) and fall within one of the four following categories:

  • research articles (25 000 to 40 000 characters without spaces, all texts included except summaries and key-word lists) ;

  • review articles and reports (10 000 to 20 000 characters without spaces, all texts included except summaries and key-word lists) ;

  • notes on teaching experiences (8000 to 15 000 characters without spaces, all texts included except summaries and key-word lists) ;

  • article or book reviews (8000 to 15 000 characters).

Key dates

Deadline for proposals:

15 October 2016

Please send your submission to: annelauredubrac@hotmail.com;linda.terrier@univ-tlse2.fr; apliut@revues.org

Please respect the guidelines for authors (https://apliut.revues.org/1965 - tocto1n3) and make sure that your proposal falls within the categories of texts published in our journal (https://apliut.revues.org/4996 - tocto1n2). Your text will then be sent for peer-review.

Editors

  • Anne-Laure Petit-Dubrac
  • Linda Terrier

Bibliography

  • Aden J. 2008. « Compétences interculturelles en didactique des langues : développer l’empathie par la théâtralisation ». In Aden J. (dir.). Apprentissages des langues et pratiques artistiques. Paris, Édition le Manuscrit, 67-102.
  • Berthoz A. 2009. La simplexité. Paris : Odile Jacob.
  • Jousse M. 2008 [1978]. L’Anthropologie du Geste. Paris : Gallimard.
  • Lapaire, J.-R. & J. Masse. 2008. « Danser la grammaire de l’anglais ». In Aden J. (dir.), Apprentissages des langues et pratiques artistiquesIn Aden J. (dir.).Apprentissages des langues et pratiques artistiques. Paris, Édition le Manuscrit, 149-176.
  • Lecoq J. 1997. Le corps poétique : un enseignement de la création théâtrale. Arles : Actes Sud.

Subjects

Date(s)

  • Saturday, October 15, 2016

Keywords

  • jeux, langue, enseignement supérieur

Contact(s)

  • Anne-Laure Dubrac
    courriel : annelauredubrac [at] hotmail [dot] com

Reference Urls

Information source

  • Anne-Laure Dubrac
    courriel : annelauredubrac [at] hotmail [dot] com

To cite this announcement

« Games and languages in higher education - the teaching practices and research journal », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Tuesday, September 20, 2016, https://calenda.org/377724

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