HomeAlla ricerca del lavoro operaio

Alla ricerca del lavoro operaio

Numero 14, Dicembre 2017

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Published on Wednesday, June 21, 2017 by Anastasia Giardinelli

Summary

Through this monographic issue titled Searching for the working class, edited by Stefano Musso (University of Turin) and Annalisa Tonarelli (University of Florence), the journal CAMBIO aims to address Italian and foreign scholars who throughout the years have explored this research theme in the field of the most diverse disciplinary contexts: from sociology to history, from anthropology to industrial relations, form economics to philosophy, to political science.

Announcement

Presentation

Searching for the Working Class
edit by Stefano Musso (University of Turin), Annalisa Tonarelli (University of Florence)


The Post-Fordist transition has brought the emergence of new forms of production and of work in the field of the so called “economy of knowledge”. This does not mean, however, that more traditional forms of employment have disappeared; quite the opposite. Whilst in the past few decades the working class has indubitably been weakened both numerically and symbolically, this social component still remains quantitatively relevant in many European countries, including Italy. Working men and women who carry out subordinate manual labour – often characterised by long shifts, precarity, low salaries, demanding tasks with a high risk of accidents and professional illnesses – continue to be a significant component of both the industrial sector and, increasingly, the service sector. However, the condition of the working class is only discussed in the case of dismissals or in the case of corporate restructuring, environmental disasters and incidents on the workplace. This “negative visibility” is one of the distinctive traits that characterise the working class today; a trait that contributes to reinforce the idea that, in contemporary society, it is a marginal and residual universe. We actually know very little about who and how many today’s workers are, how they live and work, what they fight for and how they continue to distinguish themselves from other social components. However, especially in a historical moment characterised by populist tendencies which stir most western countries, reflecting on the workers’ condition can help understand why it is necessary to defend those rights which tend otherwise to be exclusively seen as costs or privileges.
Through this monographic issue titled Searching for the working class, edited by Stefano Musso (University of Turin) and Annalisa Tonarelli (University of Florence), the journal CAMBIO aims to address Italian and foreign scholars who throughout the years have explored this research theme in the field of the most diverse disciplinary contexts: from sociology to history, from anthropology to industrial relations, form economics to philosophy, to political science.

Topic proposals

Though we welcome any analysis perspective, we encourage both theoretical and empirical work which discusses the theme paying attention to the following aspects:

  1. The quantitative dimension of subordinate manual labour in relation to the other components of the work world, paying attention to the criteria of statistical classification;
  2. The (not always rigid) boundaries between manual – intellectual – relational activities, hybrid forms and diverse activities;
  3. Old and new forms of stratification within the working class, both in industrial and service sectors, in particular – gender dimensions, ethnic belonging, status, social mobility opportunities, and territorial mobility;
  4. Labour conditions and social relations in factories and in places dedicated to service work activities;
  5. New restrictions and new opportunities for union action in the field of both industrial and tertiary work;
  6. Worker solidarity in the face of occupational crisis referring in particular to social relations inside and outside the workplace, and lifestyle, consumer trends and political participation;
  7. Social representations and self-representations of the working class between past and present.

Submission guidelines

The editorial staff will also consider essays for the non-thematic section of the Journal. We also encourage sending reviews and recommendations of books, essays and scientific events. The invitation to participate in the selection is aimed at researchers of every field of the social sciences, without preference for particular methodological or theoretical approaches. Essays – unpublished and not submitted simultaneously for evaluation by other journals – have to be sent

by the 20th September

to the editorial team, in docx, doc, or rtf format, following the rules for authors published on the website:

cambio@dsps.unifi.it
Essays can be both in Italian or English.
The editorial staff will determine whether contributions are publishable on the basis of the opinions of anonymous referees, in accordance with the double-blind peer review formula. Exceptions are made only for articles in the Contributions section.


The editorial team will inform authors of the outcome of the referees’ decisions, and thus whether the article has been accepted or not, within a month of its submission. Articles must be between 30,000 and 50,000 characters (spaces and bibliographical references included); the brief biographical note (approximately 600 characters, spaces included) must contain information about the university/institution to which the author belongs, research topics pursued, projects in progress, and major publications.

Authors must also attach:

  1. a short abstract in English, in which the gist of the article is indicated in a clear and concise manner;
  2. keywords (3 to 6, after the English abstract) which summarize the article’s contents;
  3. the title of the article, in English.

 

Editor in chief

Co-editor


Editorial committee

Scientific committee

  • Franca Alacevich, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Italy
  • Giacomo Becattini, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Italy
  • Ian Budge, University of Essex, UK
  • Sergio Caruso, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Italy
  • Alessandro Cavalli, IUSS Pavia, Italy
  • Idalina Conde, Instituto Universitário de Lisboa ISCTE-IUL, Portugal
  • Franco Crespi, Università di Perugia, Italy
  • Johan Goudsblom, Universität von Amsterdam, Holland
  • Paolo Jedlowski, Università delle Calabria, Italy
  • Hermann Korte, Universität Hamburg, Germany
  • Massimo Livi Bacci, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Italy
  • Alberto Marradi, Universidad Tres Febrero de Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Stephen Mennell, University College of Dublin, Ireland
  • Andrea Messeri, Università di Siena, Italy
  • Fausto Miguelez, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain
  • Teresa Torns, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain
  • Robert Van Krieken, University of Sidney, Australia 
  • Marcello Verga, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Italy
  • Giovanna Vicarelli, Università di Ancona, Italy

Editorial office

  • Andrea Bellini, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Italy
  • Davide Donatiello, Università di Torino, Italy
  • Emily Gubbini, Master MSc, University of Edimburgh, UK
  • Vincenzo Marasco, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Italy (Editor Manager)
  • Federico Silvestri, PoieinLab Pistoia, Italy

 

Date(s)

  • Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Attached files

Keywords

  • Travail ouvrier, economy of knowledge, economia della conoscenza

Contact(s)

  • Annalisa TONARELLI
    courriel : annalisa [dot] tonarelli [at] unifi [dot] it
  • Stefano MUSSO
    courriel : stefano [dot] musso [at] unito [dot] it

Information source

  • Christiane KOROL
    courriel : christiane [dot] korol [at] univ-amu [dot] fr

To cite this announcement

« Alla ricerca del lavoro operaio », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Wednesday, June 21, 2017, https://calenda.org/409294

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