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Forest ecosystems, living forests

Habitats forestiers et forêts habitées

How do usages, management options and social practices interact with wildlife in the forest?

Comment usages, gestions et pratiques sociales interagissent avec la faune sauvage en forêt ?

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Published on Friday, July 06, 2018 by Anastasia Giardinelli

Summary

During this workshop, we will deal with the forest, a part of our landscapes and a privileged place of interactions between nature and society, between man and wildlife. We will discuss on the past footprint of our activities, their current determinants and their challenges, as well as how forests and associated habitats might change. To achieve that task, we will favour pluridisciplinary approaches taking into account wildlife and forest ecology, their social representations and the tourist attendance associated with these natural and cultural heritages.

Announcement

Argument

During this workshop, we will deal with the forest, a part of our landscapes and a privileged place of interactions between nature and society, between man and wildlife. We will discuss on the past footprint of our activities, their current determinants and their challenges, as well as how forests and associated habitats might change. To achieve that task, we will favour pluridisciplinary approaches taking into account wildlife and forest ecology, their social representations and the tourist attendance associated with these natural and cultural heritages. We have identified four axes.

  1. Environmental and human factors that shaped current animal populations

Which usages, practices and politics have favoured the development of animal populations like wild ungulates ? Should we consider hunting as the single option to control their abundance ? Would the recolonisation of natural areas by large predators, such as the wolf, modulate the demographic and geographical expansion of these large animals ? Would that lead to the social acceptance of this natural comeback ? Will hunting or natural predation be efficient tools to preserve forest structure, composition and renewal ? 

  1. Role of wildlife in the functioning of forest ecosystems

Large herbivores lay at the centre of a network of interactions that involves flora, various faunae from the ground to the canopy and that depends on abiotic factors (water, light, temperature…). By selectively feeding on certain plants, they determine the abundance, composition and structure of the vegetation, a common resource that other faunae also use for food, as shelter or reproduction site. These animals contribute to long distance plant dispersal, nutrient fluxes and ecosystem physical engineering, with direct and indirect effects on other forest compartments. 

  1. Consequences of forest habitat management options on the wildlife

Management choices, changes in the use of forest areas or their assignment to specific uses can reshuffle in space and time resources accessible to the wildlife. How are these changes reorienting wildlife movements and influencing their use of forest habitats and landscape mosaics ? And what are the consequences for wildlife-mediated ecological processes ? 

  1. Usages and social practices around wildlife and forest habitats

Large animals interact with human activities and populations (forest and crop damages, zoonoses and traffic accidents …) but also contribute to cultural services (naturalist tourism, recreation activities like hunting and animal photography …). How can we globally tackle the social and economic benefits of this wildlife ? How do interdisciplinary research initiatives approach a multifunctional forest, at the same time a place of healing, a naturalistic observatory, a habitat for wildlife and a support for the wood resource ?

Accepted oral and posted contributions can address different spatial (from the forest plot to the entire forest) and temporal (from paleohistory to foresight) scales, apply to all forest biomes (boreal, temperate and tropical), and will shed light on at least one of the four identified axes.

Scientific committee

  • Dr. Colleen T. Downs, professor in Biodiversity & Ecosystem health at Pietermaritzburg University, South Africa
  • Dr. David Ward, professor in Plant biology at Kent State University, USA
  • Dr. Laine Chanteloup, assistant professor in Geography at Limoges University, France
  • Dr. Farid Benhammou, associated researcher at EA RURALITES and teacher in Geography at C. Guérin high school (preparation for competitive examinations), Poitiers, France
  • Dr. Guillaume Marchand, geographer at Amazonas University in Manaus, Brazil
  • Dr. Séraphine Grellier, assistant professor in Ecohydrology at UMR Citeres, University of Tours, France
  • Dr. Amélie Robert, researcher in Geography at UMR Citeres, University of Tours, France
  • Dr. Sylvie Servain, professor in Geography at UMR Citeres, Insa Centre Val de Loire, France
  • Dr. Lolita Voisin, assistant professor in Landscape and Urban Planning at Insa Centre Val de Loire, France
  • Dr. Jean-Louis Yengué, professor in Geography at EA Ruralités, University of Poitiers, France
  • Dr. Christophe Baltzinger, coordinator, Forest ecologist at UR Forest ecosystems, Irstea, France

Organizing committee

  • Dr. Séraphine Grellier, assistant professor in Ecohydrology at UMR Citeres, University of Tours, France
  • Dr. Amélie Robert, researcher in Geography at UMR Citeres, University of Tours, France
  • Dr. Sylvie Servain, professor in Geography at UMR Citeres, Insa Centre Val de Loire, France
  • Dr. Lolita Voisin, assistant professor in Landscape and Urban Planning at Insa Centre Val de Loire, France
  • Dr. Jean-Louis Yengué, professor in Geography at EA Ruralités, University of Poitiers, France
  • Dr. Christophe Baltzinger, coordinator, Forest ecologist at UR Forest ecosystems, Irstea, France

Inscription fees

(provisional amount including breaks, lunchs and Tuesday, March 26 dinner)

Professors, Researchers, Professionnals : 100 €

Students, Jobless : 80 €

A possible supplement will be asked to people wishing to participate in the visit of Chambord Castle, or discover Chambord Hunting and Wildlife Sanctuary by 4*4, Thursday, March 29, 2019, after the conference.

Schedule and terms of submission

Sunday, November 4, 2018 : deadline for abstract submission

Proposals (oral and posters) must be submitted online https://living-forests.sciencesconf.org/ 

Abstracts must contain 350 words max. Authors must precise first name, family name, affiliation and e-mail. Each proposal must refer to at least one of the four axes described and identify four key-words.

Each talk can be given either in english (preferentially) or french, with a slideshow prepared in english.

  • Friday, November 30, 2018 : date for abstract acceptance by the scientific committee
  • Monday, March 18, 2019 : deadline for manuscript submission for publication in a journal special issue or a collective work.
  • From Monday, November 18, 2018 to Friday, March 1, 2019 : online inscription to the conference (inscription tab), to be exclusively paid by credit card.
  • Tuesday, March 26 & Wednesday, March 27, 2019 : conference

For any question, please contact us via livingforests@gmail.com

Subjects

Places

  • Chambord, France (41)

Date(s)

  • Sunday, November 04, 2018

Keywords

  • Forêt, écosystème, habitat, faune, paysage, chasse, pratiques, usages, gestion, services écosystémiques, tourisme de nature

Contact(s)

  • Amélie Robert
    courriel : amelie [dot] robert [at] univ-tours [dot] fr

Reference Urls

Information source

  • Amélie Robert
    courriel : amelie [dot] robert [at] univ-tours [dot] fr

To cite this announcement

« Forest ecosystems, living forests », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Friday, July 06, 2018, https://calenda.org/451576

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