HomeSpatialisation et temporalisation de l’hospitalité

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Published on Wednesday, January 09, 2019 by Anastasia Giardinelli

Summary

We would like to question the spatial dimensions of hospitality, that is to say the way the possibility of hospitality can be conceived spatially. Correlatively, we would like to investigate the fact that the lived experience of hospitality corresponds to a temporal dynamic of gestures, relations, moments that are necessarily associated with spaces. Therefore, how does a dialogue take place, or not, in the design phase between these spatial and temporal dimensions (components) of hospitality? How is hospitality incorporated into the intentions of architects, landscape designers, artists, designers? How can one formulate in the very design phase architectural, landscape, design, artistic proposals which contribute towards hospitality?

Announcement

20th and 21st November 2019 - LACTH Laboratory

National Higher School of Architecture and Landscape design (ENSAPL) in Lille

Presentation

http://www.lille.archi.fr/recherche__index--1024417.htm

The Lacth laboratory, is organising a two-day interdisciplinary conference on the relationship between hospitality, architecture, landscape and art as part of the collaborative research project “Hospital as milieu”. The aim is to highlight the spatial dimension of hospitality.

Hospitality is linked to spaces and/or situations, and as such, refers to relationships. A relationship that is always situated, as much from the point of view, for example, of the setting, of the organisation of constraints as the layout and sharing of signification and meaning. Historically, hospitality is “the space of the other”, founded on the conceptualisation of the relationship to what is different, which is what enables “to establish society” (Gotman 2001). Through hospitality, “man is defined in a dual relationship to himself and to otherness”. In this, it may be likened to a “process of hominization” (Schérer 1993). Hospitality, taken here as a “space made for the other, a concrete other, is also a “spatialized relationship to the other” (Gotman, 2001). It would appear as “a gift of space” (Godbout, 1997), with the space given to the other to be taken literally and well as figuratively.

We would like to question the spatial dimensions of hospitality, that is to say the way the possibility of hospitality can be conceived spatially. Correlatively, we would like to investigate the fact that the lived experience of hospitality corresponds to a temporal dynamic of gestures, relations, moments that are necessarily associated with spaces. Therefore, how does a dialogue take place, or not, in the design phase between these spatial and temporal dimensions (components) of hospitality? How is hospitality incorporated into the intentions of architects, landscape designers, artists, designers? How can one formulate in the very design phase architectural, landscape, design, artistic proposals which contribute towards hospitality?  

To this end, we will look particularly at care facilities, from the hospital to the home, places of care understood in the double meaning of treatment, “cure” and “care”, Tronto, 2009). Even if here the hospital is a central element – as architecture, as a global institution (or a ‘total’ institution to take up the expression of Erving Goffman), or as a concentration of services –, it is not exclusive, since places of care also include the home.

We can thus assert that the notion of hospitality is a key for design (in general and for places of care in particular). In other words, the hospitable situation is an ideal introduction to understanding the importance of the relationship between people (living subjects) and their environment. It cannot be disregarded. On this subject, the architect André Bruyère used the term “thoughtfulness” which associates both the fact of thinking ahead and the attention paid to others (Chaslin & Roy, 2016); this indicates that design means envisaging the conditions and the qualities of the built space (environment). In relation to what emerges as a future where hospitality is lived daily by different people and groups (chronic illnesses, the ageing of the populations, increase in autism, precariousness, displacement of the population, managerial policies), is not the theme of the (un)hospitality of places of care a contemporary way of approaching the very fundamentals of architecture, of the city and society through the prism of spatial dimension and temporal dynamics?

As a living being, we cannot separate time from space; this separation is an invention, a particularly Western way of thinking, which stabilizes our relationship with the world. Consequently, we put forward that, on the one hand, architectural and landscape design is the spatial dimension of intentions associated with modes of circulation, pauses, rest, encounters, welcome, care (etc.) and that, as such, it is already time delimitated, and that on the other hand, hospitality is not an object, but a process, or a moment even. Therefore, we invite an investigation of the spatial dimension in the design as well as its experience linked with time frames. From these, we suggest taking into account the rhythms, moments, sequences, intensities linked to different places, actions and people in relation to care, whether it be an institution or in the home (threshold, wait, treatment, consultation, therapy, pause, encounters). This is accompanied by a reflection on the primary or crucial nature of lived experience and its contribution to the research as well as design.

From this point of view, an important question for the conference emerges: is hospitality, as the architect Cyrille Simonnet suggests, a “test for the architectural object” and also for landscape design (Simonnet 2004)?

To this end, we suggest that the conference be structured around three key themes:

1— Hospitality and design

The concept of hospitality envisaged (or not) and translated in the design process, in the implementation and then the reception of architectural, landscape and artistic projects associated with places of care.

What are the possible obstacles to implementation? How can one combine constraints and thoughtfulness, the programme and creativity, the different rationales? What methods for adaptation to needs (co-design, flexibility). Answers will be based on the critical analysis of built projects, project workshops (teaching) as well as with historical surveys and contemporary questions. Indeed, when one discusses interior design in the hospital sector, this implies that the space to be designed is defined, especially as regards the programmes and restrictions induced by numerous rules and regulations; this also concerns the political dimension which administers, manages and programmes, as well as the health system, whose influence on the architectural typologies, materials, (etc.) are to be questioned. For example, one might ask if it is possible to produce “undetermined” spaces in the context of contemporary medicine. Can one programme in determination or at least a lesser identification of spaces? If so, how might this be translated?

�2— Hospitality, spatialization and spatial dimensions

The spatialization and spatial dimensions inferred and implemented for and with hospitality as temporalisation, from the home to places of care. What are the experiences on the subject of paths and sensorimotor relations, from the banal to the exceptional: more specifically, peoples’ relation to (and in) the hospital as a milieu, by putting the emphasis on potential missed, missing relationships, tensions, support, welcome? The idea would be to start with interrelations and situations to discuss actual spatial dimensions and how these refer to a spatialization of hospitality (in other words, how design spatializes hospitality and demonstrates it with a specific spatial dimension). Certain strategic spaces might be discussed such as reception areas, spaces of circulation, passages, lounges. Proposals might also indicate experiences as reflective, theoretical, historical positions, etc.

This will enable us to address the recurrent problem of disorientation – which cannot simply be resumed to that of signage – which potentially affects any arrival (owing to anxiety or difficulties of extremely vulnerable people) and any departures; or again the question of accessibility, of itineraries for people with difficulties or in a wheelchair. The architecture is not or not only, also “tested” but is therefore, for example, a sensorimotor “resource”, as is landscape design.

3- Hospitality and aesthetics

Does hospitality have its own aesthetic? We mean by aesthetic an attention to the experience of places linked to their presence. The idea is to investigate forms, volumes, openings, materials, details, itineraries and how they develop over time (alternatively day/night, season, rhythms) by asking if their presence and contribution in terms of sensoriality enables an experience of space which contributes to hospitality. Therefore, the following question arises: how can a certain thoughtfulness be translated? Should the duality of form and function be re-examined?

How is the architectural design of hospitality buildings or hospitable organisations - places of care, including the home or those which take up domestic models – being transformed as regards the concept of hospitality? Can one identify an aesthetic? And this, in an international as well as a French context. The proposals will look to demonstrate criteria for interpretation and a definition of an “aesthetic of hospitality” or taking care – from details of the layout of the itinerary–, the political aspects of which are not to be neglected. Aesthetics is not limited here to formal aspects but, in the choices, involves the implementation, the uses, the resulting practices and values, politics in the wider meaning of the relationship between people (and more precisely the horizon of relations), between people and institutions.

Further reading

Cahiers Thématiques, n°18, “Hospitality(ies). Space(s) of care, tension and presence”, Ensap Lille, Lacth, Ed. Maison des Sciences de l’Homme, déc. 2018.

Cassin (Barbara), La Nostalgie. Quand donc est-on chez soi, Paris, Autrement, 2018.

Chaslin (François), Roy (Eve), André Bruyère, Paris, Editions du Patrimoine, 2016.

Derrida (Jacques), De l'hospitalité (avec Anne Dufourmantelle), Paris, Calmann-Lévy, 1997.

Godbout (Jacques), « Recevoir, c’est donner », in Communications, 65, 1997, L’hospitalité

Gotman (Anne), Le Sens de l’hospitalité : Essai sur les fondements sociaux de l’accueil de l’autre, Paris, Presses Universitaires de France, coll. Le Lien social, 2001.

Laget (Pierre-Louis), Laroche (Claude), L’Hôpital en France. Histoire et architecture, Paris, Cahiers du patrimoine, 2012.

Maldiney (Henri), « La Fondation Maeght à Saint Paul de Vence » [1964] Cahiers de Pensée et d’histoires de l’architecture, Ecole d’architecture de Grenoble, n°4, Feb. 1985.

— L'art, l'éclair de l'être, éd. Comp'act, 1993.

Montandon (Alain), Lieux d’hospitalité, hospices, hôpital, hostellerie, Clermont-Ferrand, Presses Universitaires Blaise Pascal, CRLMC, 2001.

Paperman (Patricia) and Laugier (Sandra), Le souci des autres, Paris, Ed. EHESS, 2008.

Riboulet (Pierre), Naissance d’un hôpital. Journal de travail, [1989], 3ème édition, Lagrasse, Verdier, 2010

Severo (Donato) and Kovess (Viviane), Architecture et psychiatrie. Approches françaises et internationales, Paris, Editions Le Moniteur, 2017

Simondon (Gilbert), Cours sur la perception (1964-65), Chatou, Les Editions de la Transparence, 2006.

— Imagination et Invention, (cours 1965-1966) Les Editions de la Transparence, Chatou, 2008.

Simonnet (Cyrille) « Hospitalité », Faces hiver 2004-2005, special issue on Hospitality.

Straus (Erwin), Du sens des sens (Contribution à l'étude des fondements de la psychologie), [1935], translated by Georges Thines and Jean-Pierre Legrand, Grenoble, Ed. Jérôme Millon, 1989.

Tronto (Joan), Un monde vulnérable. Pour une politique du care, Paris, La Découverte, 2009.

Worms (Frédéric), Le moment du soin, Paris, PUF, 2010.

Organisational committee

  • Céline Barrère (MCF, Ensap Lille, Lacth)
  • Catherine Grout (Pr., Ensap Lille, Lacth)
  • Ekatarina Shamova (Doctoral student, Lacth)

Scientific committee

  • Céline Barrère (MCF, Ensap Lille, Lacth)
  • Catherine Deschamps (MCF Ensa Paris Val-de-Seine, Evcau)
  • Isabelle Duhau (Cultural Heritage Inventory, Ministry of Culture)
  • Yankel Fijalkow (Pr., Ensa Paris Val-de-Seine, CRH-LAVUE)
  • Philippe Grandvoinnet, (State architect and urban planner, ENSA Grenoble)
  • Catherine Grout (Pr., Ensap Lille, Lacth)
  • Pierre-Louis Laget (Honorary heritage curator, Cultural heritage department - Hauts-de-France regional Council)
  • Pierre Lebrun (Lacth)
  • Jean-Philippe Pierron (Pr., Jean Moulin University, Lyon, Labex IMU)
  • Sylvie Salles (Pr., Ensp Versailles, Larep)
  • Donato Severo (Pr., Ensa Paris-Val-de-Seine, Evcau)

Calendar

10 December 2018: launch of the call for papers

15 February 2019: deadline for submitted papers

End March 2019: meeting of the scientific committee and feedback to the authors

September 2019: launch of the Conference programme  

End October 2019: deadline for texts – 25,000 characters

The conference will take place on 20th and 21st November 2019 at the School of Architecture and Landscape Design and at the MESHS (European centre of social human studies) in Lille (North France).

Deadline for proposals

Proposal summaries of 2000 to 2500 characters with a bibliography should demonstrate a clear angle and a methodological and disciplinary framework.

Proposals should be sent before 15th February 2019 to the following addresses:

  • Céline Barrère: c-barrere@lille.archi.fr
  • Catherine Grout: c-grout@lille.archi.fr
  • Ekaterina Shamova: hospitalites@lille.archi.fr

Places

  • 2 rue Verte
    Villeneuve-d'Ascq, France (59)

Date(s)

  • Friday, February 15, 2019

Keywords

  • hospitalité, spatialisation, temporalisation, conception spatiale, expérience, lieux de soin

Contact(s)

  • catherine grout
    courriel : c-grout [at] lille [dot] archi [dot] fr

Information source

  • catherine grout
    courriel : c-grout [at] lille [dot] archi [dot] fr

To cite this announcement

« Spatialisation et temporalisation de l’hospitalité », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Wednesday, January 09, 2019, https://calenda.org/536940

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