HomeWriting/Translating social media

Writing/Translating social media

Écrire / traduire les réseaux sociaux

*  *  *

Published on Tuesday, March 19, 2019 by Céline Guilleux

Summary

Social media are now an integral part of our daily lives and the plurality of uses and misuses of those tools is striking : they range from personal interactions to corporate advertising or political campaigning, and from passive consumption of content to creative practices. Through their interfaces and because of their relation to time and topicality, social media trigger specific modes of writing and translating; they also impact the whole chain of publishing, redefine readership and raise archival issues. On could also mention the recent concentration of mainstream media within the GAFAM and an increased relianceon machine-generated content. We therefore welcome contributions that examine the process of writing and/or translating social media from a creative writing, translation studies, institutional, sociological or economic perspective.

Announcement

October 17-19, 2019, Paris, France

Argument

Social media, which appeared in the second half of the 2000s, have rapidly developed and are now an integral part of our daily lives. In 2018 they attracted between 2,62 and 3,19 billion users (www.statista.com/ www.smartinsights.com) and some platforms such as Facebook act as a gateway to many, if not most of our online activities.Though the number of major players is limited (Facebook, WhatsApp, Twitter, Instagram, Youtube, Snapchat, WeChat, Tumblr…), the plurality of uses and misuses of those tools is striking: they range from personal interactions to corporate advertising or political campaigning, and from passive consumption of content to creative practices.

It can be argued that social media, through the technical constraints of their interfaces and their specific relation to time and topicality, trigger specific modes of writing and translating. Online stylistics differ markedly from that of traditional paper-based texts (Crystal 2006, Cronin 2013, Saemmer 2015), new phenomena are emerging such as littératube (Bonnet 2018), and many authors embrace both multimedia and crossmedia content.

Beyond the creative practices of authors, social media also impact the whole chain of publishing. Because they are based on direct access to user-generated content through platforms and a horizontal mode of circulation through retweeting and sharing, they challenge the traditional editorial model (Bouquillion 2018, Fülöp 2019) and the traditional translation process (Desjardins 2017). They also redefine readership, both in the act of reading and the volume of potential audience. They raise archival issues related to selection, collection, and storage. Finally, this rapidly evolving industry has recently witnessed a greater concentration of mainstream media within the GAFAM and an increased reliance on machine-generated content, for instance through automated translation and tagging.

We therefore welcome contributions that examine the process of writing and/or translating social media from a creative writing, translation studies, institutional, sociological or economic perspective. We invite contributions that include, but are not limited to, the following themes:

* Copywriting/translating under specific spatial, temporal or social constraints (netiquette). * Use of non-verbal items (emojis, hastags, tinyurls) and multimedia. * Complying with or repurposing presentation algorithms. * Dealing with digital interface affordances.* Mainstream social media platforms versus specialized social media * Use of automated translation.* Interaction with readers. * The logic of sharing, repurposing, transforming content into memes.* Issues of authorship and intellectual property* Monetizing social media writing/translating* Archiving social media: selection, data collection, preservation, and storage

Scientific committee

  • Claire Larsonneur (University of Paris 8)
  • Erika Fülöp (University of Lancaster)
  • Suzanne Dumouchel (OPERAS research infrastructure)
  • Renée Desjardins (University of Saint Boniface)
  • Allan Deneuville (University of Paris 8)
  • Canan Marasligil (author and translator)

Confirmed keynote speakers

  • Renée Desjardins (University of Saint Boniface, Canada), author of Translation and social media, Palgrave-Macmillan 2017
  • Alexandra Saemmer, (University of Paris 8), author of Les frontières de l’oeuvre numérique, Presses de l’Université de Saint Etienne, 2015, and Rhétorique du texte numérique, presses de l’ENSSIB, 2015.
  • Canan Marasligil, author and translator.

Submission guidelines

Abstracts of around 300 words should be submitted to the EasyChair interface for the conference https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=wtsm19

by the 30th of April 2019.

All proposals must include a title, 4-5 keywords, author name(s), institutional affiliation(s) and contact details.We welcome proposals (and communications) both in French and English.Contact : claire.larsonneur@univ-paris8.fr

Key dates

  • 30 April 2019: Deadline for abstract submission.
  • 30 May 2019: Notification of accepted proposals.
  • Thursday 17- Saturday19 October, 2019: Conference in Paris

Places

  • Paris, France (75)

Date(s)

  • Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Attached files

Keywords

  • traduction, littérature, écriture, réseau social, translating, writing, social media

Contact(s)

  • Claire Larsonneur
    courriel : claire [dot] larsonneur [at] univ-paris8 [dot] fr

Reference Urls

Information source

  • Claire Larsonneur
    courriel : claire [dot] larsonneur [at] univ-paris8 [dot] fr

To cite this announcement

« Writing/Translating social media », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Tuesday, March 19, 2019, https://calenda.org/585659

Archive this announcement

  • Google Agenda
  • iCal