HomeThinking about Postwar Latin America (19th and 20th centuries)

Thinking about Postwar Latin America (19th and 20th centuries)

Penser l’après-guerre. Amériques latines (XIXe-XXe siècles)

Special issue of Atlante – Revue d’étude romanes (nº 14, printemps 2021)

Dossier dans la revue Atlante - Revue d’étude romanes nº 14, printemps 2021

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Published on Monday, October 28, 2019 by Anastasia Giardinelli

Summary

The Latin American countries that emerged from the disintegration of the Portuguese and Spanish empires were born in a context of independence wars that lasted years, if not decades, and whose civil character and the violence that they generated, as well as the complexity of the dynamics at work, have been understood in a new light by Latin Americanist historiography in America and Europe. Postwar experiences are quite another matter. Over the past decades in France, and more broadly in Europe, this field has expanded, as shown by innovating studies of 20th century European conflicts, as well as the wars of decolonization, whether in social, cultural or political history, or even international relations. With regards to Latin America, the period following the Cold War, characterized by military dictatorships and civil wars, has been studied in terms of democratic transitions and problems associated with human rights and transitional justice.

Announcement

Presentation

The Latin American countries that emerged from the disintegration of the Portuguese and Spanish empires were born in a context of independence wars that lasted years, if not decades, and whose civil character and the violence that they generated, as well as the complexity of the dynamics at work, have been understood in a new light by Latin Americanist historiography in America and Europe. Postwar experiences are quite another matter. Over the past decades in France, and more broadly in Europe, this field has expanded, as shown by innovating studies of 20th century European conflicts, as well as the wars of decolonization, whether in social, cultural or political history, or even international relations. With regards to Latin America, the period following the Cold War, characterized by military dictatorships and civil wars, has been studied in terms of democratic transitions and problems associated with human rights and transitional justice.

On the other hand, the postwar problem it all of its diversity and complexity has been little studied for previous periods, whether concerning the wars of independence at the beginning of the 19th century[1] or the inter-American conflicts that shook the continent throughout the 19th and the beginning of the 20th centuries. Civil wars, low intensity border wars, multinational wars such as the Paraguay (1864-1870), the Pacific (1879-1883) or the Chaco (1932-1935) wars, whose civil dimensions are important, were nonetheless common. With regards to the Paraguay and Chaco wars, the most consequential work has been done in the framework of international research projects and edited volumes[2], but historians have not taken up the mantle of these studies. At the same time an epistemological reflection is still lacking on the implementation of this type of study (in accordance with the chosen methodological approach) or on the sources likely to illuminate the different facets of postwar experiences.

This edited volume for the journal Altante (https://atlante.univ-lille.fr/), which follows a workshop on the theme that was organized in June 2019 at the Université de Lille, aims to draw up an historiographical appraisal of these questions in the Americas, taking a starting point the first armed mobilizations of the 19th century such as the English invasions of Buenos Aires in 1806 up to the Chaco war. The articles might look at this question from the perspective of law (peace treaties, amnesties…), the return of exiles and soldiers, benefits granted to demobilized soldiers, widows and orphans as well as the injured (whether physically or psychologically) as well as the commemorative practices and the production of consensual narratives and the impact of war on currents of philosophical or political thought (pacifism, for example), literature, epistolary exchange or artistic expression (theatre, music, painting, statues, war photography).

Submission Guidelines

The proposals, with an abstract and a brief CV, should be sent to

  • veronique.hebrard@univ-lille.fr and
  • edward.blumenthal@sorbonne-nouvelle.fr

Deadline: Dec 15, 2019

  • Véronique Hébrard (Univ. Lille, EA 4074 CECILLE)
  • Edward Blumenthal (Univ. Sorbonne Nouvelle, EA 2052 CRICCAL)

Notes

[1] Several recent studies on the Neo Granadian and Rioplatense spaces have raised these issues. Alejandro Rabinovich, La société guerrière. Pratiques, discours et valeurs militaires dans le Rio de la Plata, 1806-1852, Rennes, PUR, 2013. Juan Carlos Chaparro Rodríguez, ¡ Desmilitarizar las repúblicas!: ideario y proyecto político de los civilistas neogranadinos y venezolanos, 1810-1858. Editorial Universidad del Rosario, 2017; Carlos Camacho, Margarita Garrido, et Daniel Gutiérrez (ed.), Paz en la república. Colombia Siglo XIX., Bogotá, U. Externado de Colombia, 2019.

[2] See in particular the volume edited by three top specialists of Paraguay on the subject. Nicolas Richard ; Luc Capdevila ; Capucine Boidin (sous la direction de), Le Paraguay à l’ombre de ses guerres. Actes du colloque international, París, 17-19 novembre 2005, París, Colibris, 2007.

Places

  • Lille, France (59)

Date(s)

  • Sunday, December 15, 2019

Keywords

  • Amérique Latine, après-guerres, histoire, littérature, archives

Contact(s)

  • Véronique Hébrard
    courriel : veronique [dot] hebrard [at] univ-lille [dot] fr

Reference Urls

Information source

  • Véronique Hébrard
    courriel : veronique [dot] hebrard [at] univ-lille [dot] fr

To cite this announcement

« Thinking about Postwar Latin America (19th and 20th centuries) », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Monday, October 28, 2019, https://calenda.org/694394

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