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The politics and geopolitics of translation

Políticas e geopolíticas de tradução

Politiques et géopolitiques de la traduction

The multilingual circulation of knowledge and transnational histories of geography

Circulação multilingue do conhecimento e histórias transnacionais da geografia

Circulation multilingue des savoirs et histoires transnationales de la géographie

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Published on Wednesday, March 18, 2020 by Céline Guilleux

Summary

In the last fifty years, the field of the history of geography has moved from an approach dominated by National Schools to an attention to the circulation of knowledge in its multiple scales. The history of science and of geography have in the last decades incorporated concepts such as transit, networks, mobilities, the transnational, circulation, centre of calculation, spaces of knowledge, geographies of science, spatial mobility of knowledge, geographies of reading and geographies of the book. More recently, a turn has emerged towards considering the dynamics and necessities of decolonizing the history of geography. This work is turning the field of the history of geography into one of the most dynamic areas of the discipline. Yet we suggest that questions of language and translation have remained under-determined in this new field. Translation and writing have not received the same attention as, for instance, departmental histories, sites of museums, laboratories, botanic gardens, and scientific societies, for example. We suggest, therefore, that new perspectives opened up by translation studies can open new windows on the history of geography.

Nos últimos cinquenta anos, de modo geral o campo da história da geografia têm operado a passagem de uma abordagem centrada nas Escolas Nacionais em prol da circulação do conhecimento em suas múltiplas escalas. Consequentemente, o léxico da história das ciências e da geografia vem sendo progressivamente povoado por conceitos como trânsito, redes, mobilidades, transnacional, circulação, transferência, centrais de cálculo, espaços do conhecimento, geografias da ciência, mobilidade espacial do conhecimento, geografias da leitura e geografias do livro. Mais recentemente, tem surgido um movimento que considera a necessidade de descolonizar a própria história da geografia, tornando este campo um dos mais dinâmicos da disciplina. Entretanto, mesmo no interior desse quadro, temas como línguas, traduções e escrita não têm recebido a mesma atenção em comparação a museus, laboratórios, jardins botânicos e sociedades científicas, por exemplo. Ao recorrermos às recentes perspectivas abertas pelo domínio dos translation studies, constatamos que as Ciências Humanas têm negligenciado o alcance e a relevância do papel das traduções.

Durant les cinquante dernières années, le champ de l’histoire de la géographie a connu un mouvement de transformation de ces approches, passant d’une lecture par les écoles nationales à une appréhension par la circulation des savoirs et des connaissances à différentes échelles. L’histoire des sciences et de la géographe a ainsi incorporé des concepts tels que « transit », « reseaux », « mobilités», « transferts », « circulations », « centres de calcul », « espaces de connaissance », « géographie des sciences », « mobilité spatiale de la connaissance », « geographies de la lecture et du livre », etc. Plus récemment, un tournant a émergé, qui considère les dynamiques et les nécessités de décoloniser l’histoire de la géographie et de la production de savoirs géographiques. Cette thématique apparaît aujourd’hui comme l’une des plus actives dans le champ de l’histoire de la géographie.

Announcement

Editors

Guilherme Ribeiro, Laura Péaud and Archie Davies

Argument

In the last fifty years, the field of the history of geography has moved from an approach dominated by National Schools to an attention to the circulation of knowledge in its multiple scales. The history of science and of geography have in the last decades incorporated concepts such as transit, networks, mobilities, the transnational, circulation, centre of calculation, spaces of knowledge, geographies of science, spatial mobility of knowledge, geographies of reading and geographies of the book (Latour 1987; Ophir & Shapin 1991; Shapin 1998; Livingstone 2003; Secord 2004; Meusburger, Livingstone & Jöns 2010; Keighren 2010; Jöns, Meusberg & Heffernan 2017). More recently, a turn has emerged towards considering the dynamics and necessities of decolonizing the history of geography (Craggs & Neate, 2019). This work is turning the field of the history of geography into one of the most dynamic areas of the discipline. Yet we suggest that questions of language and translation have remained under-determined in this new field. Translation and writing have not received the same attention as, for instance, departmental histories, sites of museums, laboratories, botanic gardens, and scientific societies, for example. We suggest, therefore, that new perspectives opened up by translation studies can open new windows on the history of geography. In general terms, the history of the Human Sciences have neglected the breadth and extent of the role of translation (Schulte 1992; Bachmann-Medick 2009). This begins from recognizing the singularity of translation, and rejecting the idea that it is merely a process of copying (Venuti 2004, 2009, 2013). Thus, if we are interested on how ideas, authors, and books travel, we cannot ignore the presence of language and translation.

Given its ethical, political, and geopolitical content (Spivak 2004 [1993]; Cassin 2018 [2004], 2018; Ricoeur 2004; Mignolo 2012), the amnesia over translation is more grave because language and translation have been active processes in promoting scientific hierarchies through periodicals, research networks, congresses, and books. The hierarchical relationship between language worlds has led to some works being designated as central, and others as peripheral to knowledge production. Translation is a key vector in the academic division of labor. From this angle, both plurilingualism and translations are phenomena that could be explain in terms of dominant and dominated languages — Latin and French in the past, English nowadays (Casanova 2015). Joining geographers from different nationalities the role of translation and the effects of the English language on academic publications have been examined by a stimulating litterature (Minca 2000; Wright 2002; Cameron 2003; Garcia-Ramon 2003; Aalbers 2004; Desbiens & Ruddick 2006; Müller 2007; Houssay-Holzschuh et Milhaud 2013 ; Novaes 2015; Germes & Husseini de Araújo 2016; Gyuris 2018). While these issues effect English native speakers in different ways, it is also worth highlighting the fractures within Global English itself, and the hierarchical practices inscribed in different modes of speaking and writing within one language. In practice, however, the criteria established by rankings, awards, and funding end up directing academic capital to papers and networks in the English language and in Anglo-saxon and European universities. The hegemony of English makes it difficult to question the canon (Keighren, Abrahamsson & della Dora 2012), or to focus attention on other geographical traditions (Ferretti 2019). This state of things  needs to be questioned in order to explore the dimensions of linguistic circuits and the resistance and fissures within Anglophone hegemony.

Recognizing that these matters continue to elicit work by geographers around the world, and encouraging their exploration from different locations and perspectives, we introduce the special issue The politics and geopolitics of translation: the multilingual circulation of knowledge and transnational histories of geography proposed by Terra Brasilis. Revista Brasileira de História da Geografia e Geografia Histórica [https://journals.openedition.org/terrabrasilis/1080]. The journal has been translating classic and contemporary geographers since its refoundation in 2012 and now seeks a wider conversation on translation, language, and circulation.    

We invite papers addressing the following questions:

The politics and geopolitics of translation and its effects on the production of geographical knowledge

The special issue seeks to question: 

  • The spatial dynamics and forms of translation in geography
  • Les traductions en zones frontalières
  • Translation in the border zones
  • The circulation of knowledge produced by the work of translating
  • Actors and networks of translation in geography   
  • The effects of domination and hegemony made visible through translation
  • The intersections between gender and translation, and feminist theories of translation

Publications, readers and writings in the light of the transnational history of geography

Here the themes could be as follows :

  • Hierarchies and asymmetries around the production of geographical knowledge in different languages
  • The coloniality of geographical knowledge
  • postcolonialism and postcolonialiy of geographical knowledge: the role of language in the search for alternatives
  • Communication, muteness, and exchanges in the “international” conferences of geography
  • Experiences of teaching and research on multilingualism
  • Individuals, networks, travels, artifacts: transnational histories of geography

Language, geography and intersectionality

Cross-cutting questions can also be envisaged, favoring an approach by minorities

  • Translation and writing in geography : issues of gender, race and class
  • The place of the Global South in the linguistic politics
  • Histories of translation and geography from the Global South: archives, journals, institutions

Information for authors

Idioms: Portuguese, Spanish, English, French

Deadline: 20th August 2020

Size: until 12 thousand words or 30 pages

Formatting: Times New Roman 12, space between paragraphes 1,5. More informations: https://journals.openedition.org/terrabrasilis/3441

Email from editors:  Guilherme Ribeiro [geofilos@msn.com], Laura Péaud [laura.peaud@gmail.com], Archie Davies [archie.oj.davies@gmail.com] and Terra Brasilis [terrabrasilis@redebrasilis.net]. Please send to all four email adresses.

References

Aalbers, M. B. (2004). Creative destruction through the Anglo-American hegemony: a non-Anglo-American view on publications, referees and language. Area 36.3, 319–322.

Bachmann-Medick, D. The translational turn. Translation Studies, vol. 2, n.1, 2-16 (2009).

Cameron, D. (2003). Foreign exchanges: the politics of translation. Critical Quaterly, vol. 45, issue 1-2, july, 215-219.

Casanova, P. (2015). La langue mondiale. Traduction et domination. Paris : Seuil.

Cassin, B. (2018). Translation as politics. Javnost - The Public, 1-9.

Cassin, B. (2018 [2004]). Apresentação da 1ª edição francesa do Vocabulaire Européen des Philosophies. Tradução de Fernando Santoro. In: Cassin, B. Dicionário dos intraduzíveis: um vocabulário das filosofias. Volume Um: Línguas. Organização de Fernando Santoro e Luisa Buarque. Belo Horizonte: Autêntica, pp. 16-21.

Craggs, R. Neate, H. (2019). What happens if we start from Nigeria? Diversifying Histories of Geography. Annals of the American Association of Geographers, 1-18.

Desbiens, C., Ruddick, S. (2006). Speaking of geography: language, power, and the spaces of Anglo-Saxon `hegemony'. Society and Space 24, pp.1-8.

Ferretti, F. (2019). Rediscovering other geographical traditions. Geography Compass, Volume 13, Issue 3, 1-15.

Garcia-Ramon, M-D. (2003). Globalization and international geography: the questions of languages and scholarly traditions. Progress in Human Geography 2 7, 1-5.

Germes, M., Husseini de Araújo, S. (2016). For a critical practice of translation in geography. ACME: an international journal for critical geographies 15 (1), 1-14. 

Gyuris, F. (2018). Problem or solution? Academic internationalization in contemporary human geography in East Central Europe. Geographische Zeitschrift 106, 1, 38-49.

Houssay-Holzschuch, M., Milhaud, O. (2013). Geography after Babel. A view from the French province. Geographica Helvetica, 68, 51-55.

Jöns, H., Meusburger, P., Heffernan, M. (Eds.). (2017). Mobilities of knowledge. Cham: Springer.

Keighren, I. M., Abrahamsson, C., della Dora, V. (2012). On canonical geographies. Dialogues in Human Geography, vol 2 (3), 296-312.

Keighren, I. M. (2010). Reading the messy reception of Influences of geographic environment (1911). In: Ogborn, Miles, Withers, Charles W.J. (Eds). Geographies of the book. Farnham: Ashgate, 277-298.

Latour, B. (1987). Science in action. How to Follow Scientists and Engineers Through Society. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.

Livingstone, D. (2003). Putting science in its place. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Meusburger, P., Livingstone, D., Jöns, H. (Eds.).  Geographies of science. Heidelberg: Springer (2010).

Mignolo, W. (2012). Reflections on translation across colonial epistemic differences. Languages, media and visual imaginary. In: Italiano, F., Rössner, M. (edited by). Translatio/n: Narration, Media and the Staging of Differences. Bielefeld: Transcript Verlag.

Minca, C. (2000). Venetian geographical praxis. Society and Space 18, 285-289.

Müller, M. (2007). What’s in a word? Problematizing translation between languages. Area, vol. 39, n. 2.

Novaes, A. R. (2015). Celebrations and challenges: the international at the 16th International Conference of Historical Geographers, London, July 2015. Journal of Historical Geography, Volume 50, October 106-108.

Ophir, A., Shapin, S. (1991). The place of knowledge. A methodological survey. Science in context 4, 1, 3-21.

Ricoeur, P. (2004). Sur la traduction. Paris: Bayard.

Secord, J. (2004). Knowledge in transit. Isis 95, 654-672.

Shapin, S. (1998). Placing the view from nowhere: historical and sociological problems in the location of science. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 23, 5-12.

Schulte, R. (1992). Translation and the academic world. Translation Review, 38-39:1.

Spivak, G. C. (2004 [1993]). The politics of translation. In: Venuti, Lawrence (edited by). Translation Studies Reader. London and New York: Routledge, 397-416.

Venuti, L. (2013). Traduire Derrida sur la traduction: relevance et résistance à la discipline. Noesis, 21, 125-129. Translated by René Lemieux. 

Venuti, L. (2009). Translation, intertextuality, interpretation. Romance studies, v.27, n.3, july, 157-173.

Venuti, L. (2004). How to read a translation. Words without borders. The online magazine for international litterature, july. Available on https://www.wordswithoutborders.org/article/how-to-read-a-translation

Wright, M. W. (2002). The scalar politics of translation. Geoforum 33, 413-414.

Direção

Sob a direção de Guilherme Ribeiro, Laura Péaud e Archie Davies

Apresentação

Nos últimos cinquenta anos, de modo geral o campo da história da geografia têm operado a passagem de uma abordagem centrada nas Escolas Nacionais em prol da circulação do conhecimento em suas múltiplas escalas. Consequentemente, o léxico da história das ciências e da geografia vem sendo progressivamente povoado por conceitos como trânsito, redes, mobilidades, transnacional, circulação, transferência, centrais de cálculo, espaços do conhecimento, geografias da ciência, mobilidade espacial do conhecimento, geografias da leitura e geografias do livro (Latour 1987; Ophir & Shapin 1991; Shapin 1998; Livingstone 2003; Secord 2004; Meusburger, Livingstone & Jöns 2010; Keighren 2010; Jöns, Meusberg & Heffernan 2017). Mais recentemente, tem surgido um movimento que considera a necessidade de descolonizar a própria história da geografia (Craggs & Neate 2019), tornando este campo um dos mais dinâmicos da disciplina. Entretanto, mesmo no interior desse quadro, temas como línguas, traduções e escrita não têm recebido a mesma atenção em comparação a museus, laboratórios, jardins botânicos e sociedades científicas, por exemplo. Ao recorrermos às recentes perspectivas abertas pelo domínio dos translation studies, constatamos que as Ciências Humanas têm negligenciado o alcance e a relevância do papel das traduções (Schulte 1992; Bachmann-Medick 2009). Neste contexto, é preciso tomá-las em suas múltiplas singularidades recusando, antes de mais nada, o sentido de cópia insistentemente a elas rotulado (Venuti 2004, 2009, 2013). Assim, quando tentamos investigar como idéias, autores e livros viajam, não podemos ignorar a presença dos idiomas e das traduções.

Este tipo de amnésia torna-se ainda mais grave porque, dados os seus conteúdos ético, político e geopolítico (Spivak 2004 [1993]; Cassin 2018 [2004], 2018; Ricoeur 2004; Mignolo 2012), as línguas participam ativamente das hierarquias e das assimetrias científicas responsáveis pela constituição de periódicos, redes de pesquisa, congressos e obras tidos como centrais ou periféricos no bojo da divisão do trabalho acadêmico. Não por acaso, tanto os países que mais traduzem quanto o plurilinguismo são fenômenos derivados de uma balança na qual a maior parte dos idiomas são considerados dominados em relação a idiomas dominantes — latim e francês no passado, inglês no presente (Casanova 2015). Reunindo geógrafos de várias nacionalidades, os papéis da tradução e os efeitos da hegemonia da língua inglesa sobre a produção geográfica  têm sido discutidos por uma crítica e estimulante literatura (Minca 2000; Wright 2002; Cameron 2003; Garcia-Ramon 2003; Aalbers 2004; Desbiens & Ruddick, 2006; Müller 2007; Houssay-Holzschuh et Milhaud, 2013; Novaes 2015; Germes & Husseini de Araújo 2016; Gyuris 2018). Uma vez que essas questões afetam nativos falantes de língua inglesa de diferentes formas, é importante sublinhar também as fraturas no bojo do próprio inglês global, assim como as práticas hierárquicas inscritas em distintos modos de falar e de escrever no interior de uma língua. Na prática, porém, os critérios estabelecidos por rankings universitários, premiações e instituições de fomento acabam por valorizar muito mais as publicações em inglês e as redes com o mundo anglo-saxão que com outros espaços. Referindo-se especialmente aos impactos sobre a história da geografia, tal estrutura dificulta seja o questionamento dos cânones (Keighren, Abrahamsson & della Dora 2012), seja o interesse pela busca de outras tradições geográficas (Ferretti 2019). Tal situação precisa ser interrogada se quisermos explorar tanto as dimensões dos circuitos idiomáticos quanto as resistências e fissuras no seio da hegemonia anglófona.

Entendendo que tais tópicos continuam a incidir sobre o trabalho de geógrafos ao redor de todo o mundo e que podem ser explorados sob os mais variados ângulos e a partir de diferentes lugares de fala, a Terra Brasilis. Revista Brasileira de História da Geografia e Geografia Histórica [https://journals.openedition.org/terrabrasilis/1080] propõe o dossiê “Políticas e geopolíticas de tradução, circulação multilingue do conhecimento e histórias transnacionais da geografia”. Se muito embora desde sua refundação em 2012 a revista tem se dedicado de maneira pontual às traduções de geógrafos clássicos e contemporâneos, por meio do presente dossiê ela buscará questionar de modo mais sistemático os desafios envolvendo tradução, língua e circulação.

            Sem querer esgotar todas as possibilidades, as temáticas sugeridas são as seguintes:

Políticas e geopolíticas de tradução e suas consequências sobre a produção de saberes geográficos

Nesta perspectiva, questionar-se-ão, entre outros tópicos:

  • dispositivos espaciais da tradução em geografia
  • traduções em zonas fronteiriças
  • circulação científica resultante do trabalho de tradução
  • atores e redes de tradução em geografia
  • efeitos da dominação e da hegemonia visíveis através das traduções

Publicações, leituras e escrita à luz de uma história transnacional da geografia

Aqui, as questões indicadas são as seguintes:

  • hierarquias e assimetrias ao redor da produção geográfica em diferentes idiomas
  • colonialidade do saber geográfico
  • pós-colonialismo, pós-colonialidade, descolonização do saber geográfico: o papel das línguas na busca de alternativas
  • comunicação, silenciamento e intercâmbio nas conferências internacionais de geografia
  • experiências de ensino e de pesquisa em plurilinguismo
  • indivíduos, redes, viagens e artefatos no âmago das histórias transnacionais da geografia

Língua, geografia e interseccionalidade

A fim de contemplar a necessária agenda das minorias, aponte-se:

  • questões de gênero ao redor da tradução e da escrita geográficas
  • o lugar do Sul Global face aos desafios linguísticos
  • histórias da geografia desde o Sul Global: arquivos, revistas, instituições

Normas de submissão

Línguas: português, espanhol, inglês, francês

Deadline: 20 de agosto de 2020

Tamanho dos artigos: até 12 mil palavras ou 30 páginas

Formatação: Fonte Times New Roman 12, espaço entre parágrafos 1,5. Mais informações: https://journals.openedition.org/terrabrasilis/3441

Email dos organizadores:  Guilherme Ribeiro [geofilos@msn.com], Laura Péaud [laura.peaud@gmail.com], Archie Davies [archie.oj.davies@gmail.com] e Terra Brasilis [terrabrasilis@redebrasilis.net]. Favor enviar para os quatro simultaneamente.

Referências

Aalbers, M. B. (2004). Creative destruction through the Anglo-American hegemony: a non-Anglo-American view on publications, referees and language. Area 36.3, 319–322.

Bachmann-Medick, D. The translational turn. Translation Studies, vol. 2, n.1, 2-16 (2009).

Cameron, D. (2003). Foreign exchanges: the politics of translation. Critical Quaterly, vol. 45, issue 1-2, july, 215-219.

Casanova, P. (2015). La langue mondiale. Traduction et domination. Paris : Seuil.

Cassin, B. (2018). Translation as politics. Javnost - The Public, 1-9.

Cassin, B. (2018 [2004]). Apresentação da 1ª edição francesa do Vocabulaire Européen des Philosophies. Tradução de Fernando Santoro. In: Cassin, B. Dicionário dos intraduzíveis: um vocabulário das filosofias. Volume Um: Línguas. Organização de Fernando Santoro e Luisa Buarque. Belo Horizonte: Autêntica, pp. 16-21.

Craggs, R. Neate, H. (2019). What happens if we start from Nigeria? Diversifying Histories of Geography. Annals of the American Association of Geographers, 1-18.

Desbiens, C., Ruddick, S. (2006). Speaking of geography: language, power, and the spaces of Anglo-Saxon `hegemony'. Society and Space 24, pp.1-8.

Ferretti, F. (2019). Rediscovering other geographical traditions. Geography Compass, Volume 13, Issue 3, 1-15.

Garcia-Ramon, M-D. (2003). Globalization and international geography: the questions of languages and scholarly traditions. Progress in Human Geography 2 7, 1-5.

Germes, M., Husseini de Araújo, S. (2016). For a critical practice of translation in geography. ACME: an international journal for critical geographies 15 (1), 1-14. 

Gyuris, F. (2018). Problem or solution? Academic internationalization in contemporary human geography in East Central Europe. Geographische Zeitschrift 106, 1, 38-49.

Houssay-Holzschuch, M., Milhaud, O. (2013). Geography after Babel. A view from the French province. Geographica Helvetica, 68, 51-55.

Jöns, H., Meusburger, P., Heffernan, M. (Eds.). (2017). Mobilities of knowledge. Cham: Springer.

Keighren, I. M., Abrahamsson, C., della Dora, V. (2012). On canonical geographies. Dialogues in Human Geography, vol 2 (3), 296-312.

Keighren, I. M. (2010). Reading the messy reception of Influences of geographic environment (1911). In: Ogborn, Miles, Withers, Charles W.J. (Eds). Geographies of the book. Farnham: Ashgate, 277-298.

Latour, B. (1987). Science in action. How to Follow Scientists and Engineers Through Society. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.

Livingstone, D. (2003). Putting science in its place. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Meusburger, P., Livingstone, D., Jöns, H. (Eds.).  Geographies of science. Heidelberg: Springer (2010).

Mignolo, W. (2012). Reflections on translation across colonial epistemic differences. Languages, media and visual imaginary. In: Italiano, F., Rössner, M. (edited by). Translatio/n: Narration, Media and the Staging of Differences. Bielefeld: Transcript Verlag.

Minca, C. (2000). Venetian geographical praxis. Society and Space 18, 285-289.

Müller, M. (2007). What’s in a word? Problematizing translation between languages. Area, vol. 39, n. 2.

Novaes, A. R. (2015). Celebrations and challenges: the international at the 16th International Conference of Historical Geographers, London, July 2015. Journal of Historical Geography, Volume 50, October 106-108.

Ophir, A., Shapin, S. (1991). The place of knowledge. A methodological survey. Science in context 4, 1, 3-21.

Ricoeur, P. (2004). Sur la traduction. Paris: Bayard.

Secord, J. (2004). Knowledge in transit. Isis 95, 654-672.

Shapin, S. (1998). Placing the view from nowhere: historical and sociological problems in the location of science. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 23, 5-12.

Schulte, R. (1992). Translation and the academic world. Translation Review, 38-39:1.

Spivak, G. C. (2004 [1993]). The politics of translation. In: Venuti, Lawrence (edited by). Translation Studies Reader. London and New York: Routledge, 397-416.

Venuti, L. (2013). Traduire Derrida sur la traduction: relevance et résistance à la discipline. Noesis, 21, 125-129. Translated by René Lemieux. 

Venuti, L. (2009). Translation, intertextuality, interpretation. Romance studies, v.27, n.3, july, 157-173.

Venuti, L. (2004). How to read a translation. Words without borders. The online magazine for international litterature, july. Available on https://www.wordswithoutborders.org/article/how-to-read-a-translation

Wright, M. W. (2002). The scalar politics of translation. Geoforum 33, 413-414.

Direction

Sous la direction de Guilherme Ribeiro, Laura Péaud et Archie Davies

Argumentaire

Durant les cinquante dernières années, le champ de l’histoire de la géographie a connu un mouvement de transformation de ces approches, passant d’une lecture par les écoles nationales à une appréhension par la circulation des savoirs et des connaissances à différentes échelles. L’histoire des sciences et de la géographe a ainsi incorporé des concepts tels que “transit”, “reseaux”, “mobilités”, “transferts”, “circulations”, “centres de calcul”, “espaces de connaissance”, “géographie des sciences”, “mobilité spatiale de la connaissance”, “geographies de la lecture et du livre”, etc. (Latour 1987; Ophir & Shapin 1991; Shapin 1998; Livingstone 2003; Secord 2004; Meusburger, Livingstone & Jöns 2010; Keighren 2010; Jöns, Meusberg & Heffernan 2017).  Plus récemment, un tournant a émergé, qui considère les dynamiques et les nécessités de décoloniser l’histoire de la géographie et de la production de savoirs géographiques (Craggs & Neate 2019). Cette thématique apparaît aujourd’hui comme l’une des plus actives dans le champ de l’histoire de la géographie.

Pourtant, dans ce context de renouvellement thématiques, la langue, la traduction ou l’écriture n’ont cependant pas encore la même importance que les lieux de savoir (musées et muséums, laboratoires, jardins botaniques ou sociétés savantes par exemple), qui restent les entrées majeures des historiens des sciences et de la géographie. Or, il apparaît pourtant que ces thèmes s’intègrent pleinement à l’histoire des sciences : les récentes perspectives ouvertes par le champ des translation studies le montrent, tout en signalant que les sciences humaines et sociales ont pour l’instant négligé cette approche (Schulte 1992; Bachmann-Medick 2009; Venuti 2004, 2009, 2013). Il nous semble ainsi intéressant de considérer les traductions et plus généralement les enjeux linguistiques, car de la même manière que les idées, les auteurs et les livres voyagent, les mots ont aussi leurs propres circulations.

En considérant par ailleurs leur aspect éthique, politique et géopolitique (Spivak 2004 [1993]; Cassin 2018, 2018; Ricoeur 2004; Mignolo 2012), il est d’autant plus urgent de considérer la manière dont les langues et traductions scientifiques ont contribué activement à l’élaboration de structures et de hiérarchies scientifiques assez figées. Que l’on considère en effet les réseaux de recherche, les revues, les congrès ou les livres, toutes ces productions sont engagées dans une logique de concurrence, les plaçant selon leur langue dans une position centrale ou périphérique dans le champ. Vus sous cet angle, à la fois le plurilinguisme et la traduction peuvent être compris dans une logique de domination par une ou quelques langues hégémoniques – le latin, le français hier ; aujourd’hui l’anglais (Casanova 2015). Hormis les géographes anglo-saxons, nettement moins concernés par cet enjeu du fait de leur position hégémonique, cette question engage les géographes de toutes nationalités et de toutes langues. Le rôle de la traduction et les effets de l’anglais sur les publications académiques ont en effet été bien démontrés par une littérature récente très stimulante (Minca 2000; Wright 2002; Cameron 2003; Garcia-Ramon 2003; Aalbers 2004; Desbiens & Ruddick, 2006; Müller 2007; Houssay-Holzschuh et Milhaud, 2013; Novaes 2015; Germes & Husseini de Araújo 2016; Gyuris 2018). En pratique, les critères de ranking, de récompense et de recherche de fonds favorisent les articles écrits en langue anglais et les réseaux anglo-saxons et/ou européens plus que les autres. Même au sein de l’anglophonie, des effets de domination entre Amérique du Nord-Europe et reste du monde sont bien sensibles. Dans l’histoire de la géographie, cette prégnance linguistique de l’anglais rend difficile la remise en question des canons académiques (Keighren, Abrahamsson & della Dora 2012) ou l’intérêt porté à d’autres traditions géographiques nationales (Ferretti, 2019). De tels effets méritent d’être interrogés par l’histoire de la discipline, afin de montrer les invariants, la structuration des circuits linguistiques et de traduction et l’existence de poches de luttes, de résistances et d’alternatives à cette hégémonie.

Reconnaissant que ces enjeux linguistiques pèsent, de manière aussi bien historique que contemporaine, sur le travail des géographes, et qu’ils peuvent être interrogés selon un angle de vue renouvelé, la revue Terra Brasilis. Revista Brasileira de História da Geografia e Geografia Histórica [https://journals.openedition.org/terrabrasilis/1080] propose un numéro spécial « Politiques et géopolitiques de la traduction, circulation des savoirs et histoires transnationales de la géographie ». Depuis sa refondation en 2012, la revue se penche sur les enjeux de traduction, de manière ponctuelle. A travers ce numéro, elle cherche à questionner plus systématiquement les enjeux de traduction, langage et circulation.

De manière non exhaustive, les articles pourront porter sur les thématiques suivantes :

Les politiques et géopolitiques de la traduction et leurs conséquences sur la production des savoirs géographiques

Dans cette perspective, il s’agira entre autres de questionner :

  • Les dispositifs spatiaux de la traduction en géographie
  • Les traductions en zones frontalières
  • Les circulations scientifiques résultant du travail de traduction
  • Les acteurs et réseaux de la traduction en géographie
  • Les effets de domination et d’hégémonie visibles à travers la traduction

Publications, lectures et écritures dans une perspective d’histoire transnationale de la géographie

Ici les enjeux soulevés pourront être de plusieurs ordres :

  • Les hiérarchies et asymétries autour de la production de la géographie en différentes langues
  • La colonialité du savoir géographique
  • Postcolonialisme et postcolonialité du savoir géographique : la place de la langue dans la recherche d’alternatives
  • Communication, silence et échange dans les conférences internationales de géographie
  • Expériences d’enseignement et de recherche en plurilinguisme
  • Les individus, les réseaux, les voyages et les artefacts au cœur des histoires transnationales de la géographie

Langue, géographie et intersectionnalité

Des questionnements transversaux peuvent également être envisagés, en privilégiant une approche par les minorités :

  • Les questions de genre autour de la traduction et de l’écriture de la géographie
  • La place du Global South dans les enjeux linguistiques
  • Histoires de la géographie depuis le Global South: archives, journaux et institutions

Modalités de soumission

Langues : Portugais, Espagnole, Français, Anglais

Deadline : 20/08/2020

Taille de l’article : jusqu’à douze mille mots ou 30 pages

Mise en page : Fonte Times New Roman 12, l’espacement entre paragraphes 1,5. Plus d’informations : https://journals.openedition.org/terrabrasilis/3441

Adresses mail des coordinateurs : Guilherme Ribeiro [geofilos@msn.com], Laura Péaud [laura.peaud@gmail.com], Archie Davies [archie.oj.davies@gmail.com] et Terra Brasilis [terrabrasilis@redebrasilis.net]. Merci d’envoyer à tous les quatre en même temps.

Bibliographie

Aalbers, M. B. (2004). Creative destruction through the Anglo-American hegemony: a non-Anglo-American view on publications, referees and language. Area 36.3, 319–322.

Bachmann-Medick, D. The translational turn. Translation Studies, vol. 2, n.1, 2-16 (2009).

Cameron, D. (2003). Foreign exchanges: the politics of translation. Critical Quaterly, vol. 45, issue 1-2, july, 215-219.

Casanova, P. (2015). La langue mondiale. Traduction et domination. Paris : Seuil.

Cassin, B. (2018). Translation as politics. Javnost - The Public, 1-9.

Cassin, B. (2018 [2004]). Apresentação da 1ª edição francesa do Vocabulaire Européen des Philosophies. Tradução de Fernando Santoro. In: Cassin, B. Dicionário dos intraduzíveis: um vocabulário das filosofias. Volume Um: Línguas. Organização de Fernando Santoro e Luisa Buarque. Belo Horizonte: Autêntica, pp. 16-21.

Craggs, R. Neate, H. (2019). What happens if we start from Nigeria? Diversifying Histories of Geography. Annals of the American Association of Geographers, 1-18.

Desbiens, C., Ruddick, S. (2006). Speaking of geography: language, power, and the spaces of Anglo-Saxon `hegemony'. Society and Space 24, pp.1-8.

Ferretti, F. (2019). Rediscovering other geographical traditions. Geography Compass, Volume 13, Issue 3, 1-15.

Garcia-Ramon, M-D. (2003). Globalization and international geography: the questions of languages and scholarly traditions. Progress in Human Geography 2 7, 1-5.

Germes, M., Husseini de Araújo, S. (2016). For a critical practice of translation in geography. ACME: an international journal for critical geographies 15 (1), 1-14. 

Gyuris, F. (2018). Problem or solution? Academic internationalization in contemporary human geography in East Central Europe. Geographische Zeitschrift 106, 1, 38-49.

Houssay-Holzschuch, M., Milhaud, O. (2013). Geography after Babel. A view from the French province. Geographica Helvetica, 68, 51-55.

Jöns, H., Meusburger, P., Heffernan, M. (Eds.). (2017). Mobilities of knowledge. Cham: Springer.

Keighren, I. M., Abrahamsson, C., della Dora, V. (2012). On canonical geographies. Dialogues in Human Geography, vol 2 (3), 296-312.

Keighren, I. M. (2010). Reading the messy reception of Influences of geographic environment (1911). In: Ogborn, Miles, Withers, Charles W.J. (Eds). Geographies of the book. Farnham: Ashgate, 277-298.

Latour, B. (1987). Science in action. How to Follow Scientists and Engineers Through Society. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.

Livingstone, D. (2003). Putting science in its place. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Meusburger, P., Livingstone, D., Jöns, H. (Eds.).  Geographies of science. Heidelberg: Springer (2010).

Mignolo, W. (2012). Reflections on translation across colonial epistemic differences. Languages, media and visual imaginary. In: Italiano, F., Rössner, M. (edited by). Translatio/n: Narration, Media and the Staging of Differences. Bielefeld: Transcript Verlag.

Minca, C. (2000). Venetian geographical praxis. Society and Space 18, 285-289.

Müller, M. (2007). What’s in a word? Problematizing translation between languages. Area, vol. 39, n. 2.

Novaes, A. R. (2015). Celebrations and challenges: the international at the 16th International Conference of Historical Geographers, London, July 2015. Journal of Historical Geography, Volume 50, October 106-108.

Ophir, A., Shapin, S. (1991). The place of knowledge. A methodological survey. Science in context 4, 1, 3-21.

Ricoeur, P. (2004). Sur la traduction. Paris: Bayard.

Secord, J. (2004). Knowledge in transit. Isis 95, 654-672.

Shapin, S. (1998). Placing the view from nowhere: historical and sociological problems in the location of science. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 23, 5-12.

Schulte, R. (1992). Translation and the academic world. Translation Review, 38-39:1.

Spivak, G. C. (2004 [1993]). The politics of translation. In: Venuti, Lawrence (edited by). Translation Studies Reader. London and New York: Routledge, 397-416.

Venuti, L. (2013). Traduire Derrida sur la traduction: relevance et résistance à la discipline. Noesis, 21, 125-129. Translated by René Lemieux. 

Venuti, L. (2009). Translation, intertextuality, interpretation. Romance studies, v.27, n.3, july, 157-173.

Venuti, L. (2004). How to read a translation. Words without borders. The online magazine for international litterature, july. Available on https://www.wordswithoutborders.org/article/how-to-read-a-translation

Wright, M. W. (2002). The scalar politics of translation. Geoforum 33, 413-414.

Date(s)

  • Thursday, August 20, 2020

Keywords

  • translation, knowledge, multilingualism, circulation

Contact(s)

  • Ribeiro Guilherme
    courriel : geofilos [at] msn [dot] com
  • Davies Archie
    courriel : archie [dot] oj [dot] davies [at] gmail [dot] com
  • Péaud Laura
    courriel : laura [dot] peaud [at] gmail [dot] com

Reference Urls

Information source

  • Ribeiro Guilherme
    courriel : geofilos [at] msn [dot] com

To cite this announcement

« The politics and geopolitics of translation », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Wednesday, March 18, 2020, https://calenda.org/761051

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