HomeGarden cities for the 21st century

Garden cities for the 21st century

Des cités-jardins pour le XXIe siècle

Valorization, preservation and challenges in France, Europe and the world

Valorisation, préservation et enjeux en France, en Europe et dans le monde

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Published on Tuesday, June 30, 2020 by Céline Guilleux

Summary

The aim of this symposium is to put into perspective the different dimensions of a common heritage stemming from the garden city concept developed by Ebenezer Howard in 1898. An overview of the situation, a comparative approach and postulations on possible futures are expected. Four lines of thought and questioning are envisaged. The themes will transversally address the dimension of the built environment and the outdoor space, at different scales encompassing collective spaces of sociability, materiality of places, representations, practices, and so forth.

Announcement

Argument

Call for papers for an international symposium organized by the Association régionale des cités-jardins d’Île-de-France (Regional Association of Garden Cities), in partnership with École d’architecture Paris-Belleville, École d’urbanisme de Paris Lab’urba, University of Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne - IREST (Institute for Research and Higher Studies on Tourism), ENSP (National School of Landscape Architecture) - Versailles-Marseille, Université Sorbonne Paris Nord, MUS (Museum of Urban and Social History of the city of Suresnes), Cultural Heritage Service of the Seine-Saint-Denis Regional Council.  

Since the 1980s, garden cities have been the subject of symposia, conferences and publications that have provided insight into and enhanced understanding of this type of heritage and its concept both as a whole and in the individual histories of each garden city. This history has been written at the local, national, European and global scale.  

Many garden cities are today facing pressure on land resources and from urban renewal, but they still remain an important marker of the history of working-class housing at the beginning of the 20th century and between the two world wars.   

The aim of this symposium is to put into perspective the different dimensions of a common heritage stemming from the garden city concept developed by Ebenezer Howard in 1898. An overview of the situation, a comparative approach and postulations on possible futures are expected. Four lines of thought and questioning are envisaged. The themes will transversally address the dimension of the built environment and the outdoor space, at different scales encompassing collective spaces of sociability, materiality of places, representations, practices, and so forth.  

1/ Valorizing garden cities

In different places, garden cities have been the object of cultural, symbolic, pedagogical and tourism valorization processes. What are the mechanisms at play in these recognition processes? What initiatives are emerging, organized for whom and by which stakeholders? What are the formal and informal networks into which they can be integrated? What are the valorization projects for the future? And on what scale?  

2/ Preserving garden cities

Garden cities are affected by sales or demolition processes, and also by maintenance work and adaptation of the built environment to contemporary levels of comfort and standards (environment, lifestyle, energy, etc.). Should garden cities be protected? What forms of protection, especially legal, have been put in place? How do restorations and renovations raise the issue of heritage conservation in garden cities, at the national and European scale? What are “best” practices for the built environment, gardens and landscapes, in the short, medium and long term? What tensions do heritage rationales reveal or activate between the different stakeholders (elected officials, landlords, home-owning residents, tenants, etc.)?

3/ Living in a garden city

Garden cities were designed as populated areas in public and private wooded spaces that remain social and shared living spaces. How do inhabitants live in these spaces? Are the characteristics of social and generational diversity still relevant? Do changes (gentrification or poverty) profoundly transform the model of the garden city? What forms of ownership and attachment, or detachment, can be identified among its inhabitants? What practices, uses and memories are transmitted? When and how do inhabitants engage around issues in these areas?

4/ Defining the garden cities of the future

Garden cities are sources of inspiration for a new approach towards urban planning, housing and landscape, but they can also be reclaimed and used as a tool for real estate marketing, or even public policies. What different social, architectural and ecological interpretations and reinterpretations can be made from the garden city model? What would a 21st-century garden city look like in terms of urban uses and modalities?

Submission procedures

This symposium will be a mix of round-table discussions and conferences.   It is open to lecturer-researchers from various disciplines (architecture, urban planning, history, law, art history, sociology, geography, landscape architecture, environment, etc.), architects and practitioners, stakeholders, representatives of collectives working for garden cities, in France and abroad. Doctoral students and young researchers are welcomed and encouraged to participate. Abstracts, in French or English and no longer than 300 words, should be sent to contact@citesjardins-idf.fr. Please include a brief presentation of the authors and a bibliography. Publication of the proceedings is planned.  

Key Dates

  • Opening of the call for papers: June 2020
  • Deadline for submissions of abstracts: 15 October 2020

  • Notification of acceptance of abstracts: 30 November 2020
  • Symposium: June 2021, held over two days, venues to be confirmed

Institutions involved

École d’architecture Paris-Belleville, École d’urbanisme de Paris Lab’urba, University of Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne - IREST (Institute for Research and Higher Studies on Tourism), ENSP (National School of Landscape Architecture) - Versailles-Marseille, Université Sorbonne Paris Nord, MUS (Museum of Urban and Social History of the city of Suresnes), Cultural Heritage Service of the Seine-Saint-Denis Regional Council.

Places

  • Théâtre Jean-Vilar
    Suresnes, France (92)

Date(s)

  • Thursday, October 15, 2020

Keywords

  • cité-jardin , valorisation, préservation, rénovation, Europe, architetcure, urbanisme, paysage, patrimoine, tourisme

Contact(s)

  • Crespo Milena
    courriel : milena [dot] crespo [at] citesjardins-idf [dot] fr

Reference Urls

Information source

  • Milena Crespo
    courriel : milena [dot] crespo [at] citesjardins-idf [dot] fr

To cite this announcement

« Garden cities for the 21st century », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Tuesday, June 30, 2020, https://calenda.org/787666

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