Calenda - The calendar for arts, humanities and social sciences

Dominion of the Sacred

Dominio del Sacro

Image, Cartography, Knowledge of the City after the Council of Trent ("In_bo" vol. 12, no. 16)

Immagine, cartografia, conoscenza della città dopo il Concilio di Trento (In_bo vol. 12, no. 16)

*  *  *

Published on Monday, July 27, 2020 by Céline Guilleux

Summary

Between the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the Italian political geography was polarized by a number of cities of different sizes and traditions: Rome and Florence, Milan and Naples, Genoa and Venice, Turin and Modena, either ancient republics or new dynastic capitals, satellites of the great European monarchies or small Signorias. The conjunction — less frequently the conflict — between the mandates of the Council of Trent and the interests of the ruling élites of those cities set the foundation for novel forms of social, cultural and spiritual control, fostering new urban structures and policies, deeply conditioned by the presence and government of the sacred.

Fra Cinque e Seicento la geografia politica italiana si polarizza intorno a un gruppo di città di varia grandezza e tradizione: Roma e Firenze, Milano e Napoli, Genova e Venezia, Torino e Modena, antiche repubbliche e nuove capitali dinastiche, satelliti delle grandi monarchie europee e piccoli centri signorili. L’incontro – più sporadicamente lo scontro – tra i dettami del Concilio di Trento e gli interessi delle élites dominanti di queste città pone le basi per inedite forme di controllo sociale, culturale, spirituale, alimentando nuovi assetti e politiche urbani, in cui la presenza e la gestione del sacro diventa elemento fortemente condizionante.

Announcement

Editors

Mario Bevilacqua (Università degli Studi di Firenze) and Marco Folin (Università degli Studi di Genova)

Argument

Between the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the Italian political geography was polarized by a number of cities of different sizes and traditions: Rome and Florence, Milan and Naples, Genoa and Venice, Turin and Modena, either ancient republics or new dynastic capitals, satellites of the great European monarchies or small Signorias. The conjunction — less frequently the conflict — between the mandates of the Council of Trent and the interests of the ruling élites of those cities set the foundation for novel forms of social, cultural and spiritual control, fostering new urban structures and policies, deeply conditioned by the presence and government of the sacred.

Prominent issues at the time were the widespread presence of male religious orders and cloistered female orders, the renewed role played by the residing diocesan curias, the parishes with their activities of social recording and control, the stabilization of the confraternities, the construction of places of worship, and the emergence of devotional practices.

In these circumstances, the Italian city became the object of a renewed attention, partly reflecting the political-religious context, and partly responding to some tangible developments of the European urban landscapes: changes in scale due to economic or demographic dynamics, ‘aristocratization’ processes, a broad stiffening of the habits, of relationships and values affecting all aspects of urban life. These are all phenomena that were keenly observed by the contemporaries, who in turn developed new tools for the investigation, analysis and representation of the city, of its spaces and buildings, with the intention of directing its transformation, its architectural and urban renewal.

The culture at that time was imbued with a new interest for the city, for its history and its present condition: the emergence and first orientations of Christian archaeology are just one among many possible examples of this tendency. In the printing market this interest for the city fed into new editorial fields; some books came to have great success and can be considered as emblematic, such as Delle cause della grandezza delle città by Giovanni Botero or Roma sotterranea by Antonio Bosio. Municipal histories, antiquarian guides, inventories of epigraphs, genealogical histories, lives of local saints, heroes and artists, all contributed to a collective imaginary that was built around the definition of the sacred.

A widespread necessity was to develop instruments to understand the city in its topography: plans, views, measurements, either handwritten or printed. Engravings, illustrated books and cartographies became means of government and instruments to disseminate official and controlled representations, hagiographical or slandering in nature, political or polemical. The case of Bologna — subject of printed plans, surveys and of the grand view in the Sala Bologna of the Vatican palace — is emblematic, but the case of the new capital of Turin is equally as compelling. Images of exemplary symbolic significance were conceived in Rome (where the ancient, the Christian and the Papal cities were stratified one onto another), as well as in Milan, Siena, Naples, just to remember a few of the most renowned cases.

New magistracies responsible for water and street management were established in different urban contexts, while medieval magistracies became subject to more rigid control by the ruling authorities. Specific laws were promulgated to regulate the regime of public spaces, more accurately than in the past: rules of urban decorum, expropriation laws, incentives for architectural renewal, etc. The ‘technical’ knowledges and their actors (architects, engineers, land surveyors, jurists, consultants of various kinds) acquired a more relevant and specific role.

We encourage contributions regarding:

  • individual urban realities and aspects of their topographical, landscape and symbolic representations, in relation to the different uses and intentions that arose specifically in the post-Tridentine age;
  • cases of urban interventions directed towards the construction of a new city image in the post-Tridentine age;
  • cross-cutting analyses of aspects, dynamics, and issues connected to the topics previously mentioned (conjunctures, contaminations, turning points, generational affinities …).

This issue of In_bo aims to shed new light on the many grey areas — within a relatively well-known research field — that have not been studied extensively yet: cities, magistracies, emblematic personalities; documentary, graphic and cartographic sources, either ignored in the past, or looking for a new interpretation; paradigmatic cases of urban images and their dissemination.

From a chronological standpoint, the definition ‘post-Tridentine’ must be intended in a wide sense: contributions regarding later transformations of the post-Tridentine layouts, will be welcome. We also wish to read comparisons with other political-institutional, social and cultural contexts, as well as for insights on cases where the instances of the reform of Roman Catholicism met/conflicted with the Protestant Reformations or with non-Christian beliefs.

Possible leads:

  • Sacred cartography (maps and views of the city under the auspices of the Virgin or of patron saints)
  • Cartographies of catastrophe (pestilence, earthquakes, fires, war destructions)
  • Religious orders and maps of the city (surveys commissioned within specific religious orders; maps of convents and monasteries…)
  • Maps and views of poverty/marginality/segregation in the city (hospitals, hospices, ghettos…)
  • Urban images as instruments of religious controversy
  • Urban iconography in the printing market (one-page prints, auteur engravings, book illustrations…)
  • Plans and surveys in the office of urban magistracies
  • City of paper VS city of stone (graphic inventories/physical demarcations of streets, quarters, districts)
  • The representation of the city in the great geo-iconographic cycles (e.g. the Gallery of Maps in the Vatican)
  • Urban images and class distinctions (maps and views as instruments for social demarcation)
  • Instruments, practices, manuals, crafts of urban survey and urban representation

Submission guidelines

Authors are invited to submit an abstract in Italian or English (3000–4000 characters, spaces included) to the email address ,

no later than October 1st, 2020.

Abstracts have to follow the Journal guidelines. The submission must include a short bio statement (350 characters max, spaces included) and the author’s affiliation. 

Click here for more information on the Journal guidelines.

In case of acceptance of the abstract, the full paper must be uploaded on the website https://in_bo.unibo.it. The essay could be in Italian or English, between 20.000 and 60.000 characters, spaces included. Full papers will undergo a double-blind peer review process.

Deadlines

  • October 1st, 2020 | Abstract submission

  • October 31st, 2020 | Abstract acceptance notification
  • April 30th, 2021 | Full paper submission
  • June 2021 | Results of peer review process
  • September 2021 | Publication

A cura di:

  • Mario Bevilacqua Università degli Studi di Firenze
  • Marco Folin Università degli Studi di Genova

Argomento

Fra Cinque e Seicento la geografia politica italiana si polarizza intorno a un gruppo di città di varia grandezza e tradizione: Roma e Firenze, Milano e Napoli, Genova e Venezia, Torino e Modena, antiche repubbliche e nuove capitali dinastiche, satelliti delle grandi monarchie europee e piccoli centri signorili. L’incontro – più sporadicamente lo scontro – tra i dettami del Concilio di Trento e gli interessi delle élites dominanti di queste città pone le basi per inedite forme di controllo sociale, culturale, spirituale, alimentando nuovi assetti e politiche urbani, in cui la presenza e la gestione del sacro diventa elemento fortemente condizionante.

Protagonisti sono allora la capillare presenza degli ordini religiosi maschili e della clausura femminile, il rinnovato apporto della curia vescovile residente, l’entità parrocchiale e il suo ruolo di controllo e registrazione sociale, il consolidarsi della presenza confraternale, il sorgere di nuovi luoghi di culto e pratiche di devozione.

In questo contesto la città italiana viene investita da nuove attenzioni, che in parte riflettono la temperie politico-religiosa, in parte rispondono ad alcuni cambiamenti tangibili del paesaggio urbano europeo: variazioni di scala dovute alle dinamiche demografiche ed economiche, processi di aristocratizzazione, il generale irrigidimento dei costumi, dei rapporti, dei valori coltivati nei più diversi ambiti della vita cittadina. Sono fenomeni che i contemporanei osservano con attenzione, elaborando nuovi strumenti di indagine, analisi, rappresentazione della città e dei relativi spazi ed edifici, ponendosi il problema di come indirizzarne la trasformazione, il rinnovamento architettonico e urbano.

Tutta la cultura del tempo è intrisa di questo rinnovato interesse per la città, la sua storia passata e il suo stato presente: la nascita e i primi orientamenti dell’archeologia cristiana ne sono un esempio fra i molti. Il mercato della stampa registra questi indirizzi che alimentano interi filoni editoriali, marcati da libri di grande fortuna e che possono essere considerati emblematici, come Delle cause della grandezza delle città di Giovanni Botero o Roma sotterranea di Antonio Bosio. Storie municipali, guide antiquarie, repertori di epigrafi, storie genealogiche, vite di santi, eroi e artisti locali, costruiscono un immaginario collettivo che passa attraverso la definizione del sacro.

Un’esigenza diffusamente avvertita è quella di poter disporre di strumenti di conoscenza della città nella sua dimensione topografica: piante, vedute, rilievi, manoscritti e a stampa. L’incisione, il libro illustrato, la cartografia diventano un mezzo di governo, ma anche uno strumento per diffondere rappresentazioni ufficiali e controllate, al tempo agiografiche o denigratorie, politiche e polemiche. Il caso di Bologna – soggetto di piante e rilievi a stampa, oltre che della grande veduta nella Sala dedicata nel palazzo Vaticano – è emblematico, ma quello di Torino nuova capitale è ugualmente significativo. Immagini di esemplare valore simbolico sono prodotte a Roma (dove la città antica, la cristiana e la pontificia si stratificano una sull’altra), così come a Milano, Siena, Napoli, solo per ricordare i casi più noti.

Un po’ dappertutto si istituiscono nuove magistrature con competenze in fatto di acque e strade, oppure le magistrature medievali vengono assoggettate a più stretti controlli da parte delle autorità sovrane. Vengono emanate normative che mirano a regolamentare il regime degli spazi pubblici in modo più puntuale che in passato: norme di decoro urbano, leggi di esproprio, incentivi al rinnovamento architettonico, ecc. I saperi ‘tecnici’ e i relativi cultori (architetti, ingegneri, agrimensori, giuristi, periti di vario genere) si vedono riconosciuto un ruolo più rilevante e specifico.

Si sollecitano pertanto contributi che prendano in considerazione:

  • singole realtà urbane e aspetti della loro rappresentazione topografica, vedutistica, simbolica, in relazione a usi e fini diversi, a partire dalle specificità insorte in età post-tridentina;
  • episodi di intervento urbano in relazione alla configurazione di una nuova immagine della città in età post-tridentina;
  • analisi trasversali di aspetti, dinamiche, questioni legate ai temi di cui sopra (congiunture, contaminazioni, punti di svolta, affinità generazionali…).

Il volume ambisce a esplorare – in un contesto già relativamente noto – le molte zone d’ombra che rimangono poco studiate: città, magistrature, personaggi emblematici; fonti documentarie, grafiche e cartografiche, ignorate o che potrebbero essere interrogate in modo diverso dal passato; casi paradigmatici di immagini urbane e della relativa diffusione. 

Dal punto di vista cronologico, l’accezione post-tridentina va intesa in una dimensione dilatata: proposte che tocchino le trasformazioni degli assetti cinque-seicenteschi nei secoli successivi saranno benvenute. Altrettanto auspicabili le aperture comparative ad altri contesti politico-istituzionali, sociali e culturali, così come verso gli orizzonti in cui le manifestazioni di riforma del cattolicesimo romano si sono incontrate/scontrate con le riforme protestanti o i credi non cristiani.

Possibili spunti:

  • Cartografia sacra (carte e vedute di città sotto l’egida della Vergine o dei santi patroni);
  • Cartografie della catastrofe (pestilenze, terremoti, incendi, distruzioni belliche);
  • Ordini religiosi e carte di città (rilievi commissionati in seno a specifici Ordini; carte di conventi e monasteri…);
  • Carte e vedute della povertà/marginalità/segregazione cittadina (ospedali, ospizi, ghetti…);
  • Le immagini urbane come strumento di controversia religiosa
  • L’iconografia urbana nel mercato della stampa (fogli volanti, incisioni d’autore, illustrazioni librarie…);
  • Piante e rilievi nelle pratiche d’ufficio delle magistrature urbane
  • Città di carta VS città di pietra (repertori grafici/demarcazioni fisiche di strade, quartieri, circoscrizioni);
  • La rappresentazione delle città nei grandi cicli geo-iconografici (es. Galleria delle carte geografiche in Vaticano);
  • Immagini urbane e distinzioni cetuali (carte e vedute come strumento di demarcazione sociale);
  • Strumenti, pratiche, manuali, mestieri del rilievo e della rappresentazione urbana.

Modalità di partecipazione

Gli autori sono invitati a inviare un abstract in italiano o inglese (3000–4000 battute, spazi inclusi) alla mail  

entro il 1 ottobre 2020.

Gli abstract dovranno essere redatti attenendosi alle linee guida della rivista. Al contributo dovrà essere allegata una breve bio (max 350 battute, spazi inclusi) e l’affiliazione.

Maggiori informazioni nelle linee guida della rivista.

In caso di accettazione dell’abstract, i saggi dovranno essere caricati sulla piattaforma online di in_bo al sito https://in_bo.unibo.it, in lingua italiana o inglese (con abstract in entrambe le lingue), e con una lunghezza compresa tra le 20.000 e le 60.000 battute spazi inclusi. I saggi saranno sottoposti ad una procedura di double-blind peer review.

Calendario

  • 1 ottobre 2020 | Chiusura call for abstracts

  • 31 ottobre 2020  | Notifica di accettazione degli abstract
  • 30 aprile 2021 | Consegna del saggio
  • Giugno 2021 | Conclusione del processo di revisione
  • Settembre 2021 | Pubblicazione

Date(s)

  • Thursday, October 01, 2020

Contact(s)

  • Sofia Nannini
    courriel : in_bo [at] unibo [dot] ir

Reference Urls

Information source

  • Sofia Nannini
    courriel : in_bo [at] unibo [dot] ir

To cite this announcement

« Dominion of the Sacred », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Monday, July 27, 2020, https://calenda.org/792876

Archive this announcement

  • Google Agenda
  • iCal