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Languages for Specific Purposes in the Middle Ages

Les langues de spécialités au Moyen Âge

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Published on Tuesday, October 06, 2020 by Céline Guilleux

Summary

The notion of languages is, however, not new, but goes back to ancient times. This is nothing surprising if we consider the range of relevant domains and the movements of populations, peaceful or not, which occurred over the centuries. We can easily consider the relations between the Norman language, spoken by the Conqueror, William, and the Saxon language, spoken by the conquered people. Considering the medieval parlier, whose role was to coordinate the architect's plans and the work of artisans from far-ranging origins at a common cathedral building site, to the specific language needs of merchants, ambassadors and preachers down the centuries, LSP is everywhere.

Announcement

Argument

Further to the international symposium, Languages for Specific Purposes in the Middle-Ages, organised in February 2017 by the Lairdil (University Paul Sabatier - Toulouse III) and the CEMA (University Paris-Sorbonne), as well as the publication of a similar volume by Cambridge Scholars Publishing, two new publications are planned for 2022. The first one is the annual issue of the French Higher Education Society for the Study of Medieval England (AMAES), followed by the publication of a second thematic volume by Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

Language for Specific Purposes (LSP) is a relatively recent notion (Galisson and Coste (1976 : 511), Lerat (1995 : 20) or Dubois and al. (2001 : 40)). The field of LSP, or more accurately LSPs, is clearly linked to professionalisation. The creation in 1982 of the Study and Research Group on English for Specific Purposes (GERAS or Groupe d'Études et de Recherche en Anglais de Spécialité), followed in 2006 by the creation of the Study and Research Group on Spanish for Specific Purposes (GERES or Groupe d’Études et de Recherche en Espagnol de Spécialité) and five years later the German-focused group GERALS for German, all show the dynamism of the research in this field.

This notion of languages is, however, not new, but goes back to ancient times. This is nothing surprising if we consider the range of relevant domains and the movements of populations, peaceful or not, which occurred over the centuries. We can easily consider the relations between the Norman language, spoken by the Conqueror, William, and the Saxon language, spoken by the conquered people. Considering the medieval parlier, whose role was to coordinate the architect's plans and the work of artisans from far-ranging origins at a common cathedral building site, to the specific language needs of merchants, ambassadors and preachers down the centuries, LSP is everywhere. Have these linguistic confrontations, be they peaceful or not, altruist or mercantile, led to the writing of didactic handbooks such as those by Caxton (1415/1422-1492) or Roger Ascham (1515-1568)? Have they led to the production of intercultural books?

Submission guidelines

These two upcoming publications on LSPs in the Middle Ages will address all aspects of LSPs regardless of geographical concerns. Papers, in English or French, between 5000 to 8000 words, should be sent to Nolwena Monnier (nolwena.monnier@iut-tlse3.fr)

before January 31st 2022 .

Authors who wish to submit a paper are advised to get in touch and submit a title with a brief description of content as soon as convenient.

Scientific committee

  • Dr Monica Alaez-Galan, Université Toulouse III, France, membre du Lairdil
  • Dr Chiara Benati, Université de Gênes, Italie
  • Pr Leo Carruthers, Paris-Sorbonne, France, ancien président de l’AMAES
  • Dr Valeria Di Clemente, Université Catane, Italie
  • Dr Irina Lord, Université Toulouse III, France, membre du Lairdil
  • Dr Elise Louviot, Université de Reims, France, Vice-présidente de l’AMAES
  • Dr Nolwena Monnier, Université Toulouse III, France, directrice adjointe du Lairdil et secrétaire de l’AMAES
  • Dr Amanda Roig, Université de Cambridge, Royaume-Uni                 
  • Pr Martine Yvernault, Université de Limoges, France ancienne présidente de l’AMAES

Subjects

Date(s)

  • Monday, January 31, 2022

Keywords

  • langue de spécialité, Moyen Âge

Contact(s)

  • Nolwena Monnier
    courriel : nolwena [dot] monnier [at] iut-tlse3 [dot] fr

Reference Urls

Information source

  • Nolwena Monnier
    courriel : nolwena [dot] monnier [at] iut-tlse3 [dot] fr

To cite this announcement

« Languages for Specific Purposes in the Middle Ages », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Tuesday, October 06, 2020, https://calenda.org/805846

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