HomeWar: A Catalyst for the Transformation of Families?

HomeWar: A Catalyst for the Transformation of Families?

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Published on Tuesday, October 27, 2020 by Céline Guilleux

Summary

This call for papers seeks to explore the effects of blurring the boundaries between the public and the private spheres and the ways in which the political is transposed into the family sphere. It also aims to understand the strategies for rearranging mutual assistance, and the redistribution process of generational and gender roles. Contributions must be based on original empirical data and can adopt various disciplinary approaches (sociology, political science, history, anthropology and geography). They can focus on Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, the Palestinian Territories, and Iraq and tackle populations directly affected by war, currently or recently, and refugees. Lebanon Support encourages contributions from experienced scholars, early career researchers, PhD candidates, practitioners, activists, and civil society experts to submit their abstracts (in Arabic, French, and English).

Announcement

Argumentaire

Since the 1990s, the field of studies on war  has undergone considerable renewal. The increase in “civil” or “internal” conflicts (Richards 2004) following the end of the Cold War has shifted the focus from States to non-state actors, and to the trajectories of combatants (Debos 2013). This shift also led to an increased interest in the reconfiguration of societies in times of war (Lubkemann 2008, Koloma Beck 2012, Gayer 2018). By elaborating on these approaches, this thematic issue proposes to focus on the family as an analysis unit allowing us to understand the upheavals of war as a continuum of the social dynamics leading to its eruption. The starting point is the empirical studies emanating from the Near East, where conflicts are a significant if not a constant aspect in the lives of many societies. This issue is also an opportunity to present the results of a collective reflection session that took place during an international symposium organised by the French Institute of the Middle-East (Ifpo) in November 2018, titled “War and Families’ Transformations in the Middle-East.”

Several studies have since highlighted the impact of conflicts on many aspects of family life in this region. In Lebanon, the Civil War (1975-1990) revived family solidarities, while redefining gender and intergenerational relations, with women and youths acquiring new roles in both the public and private spheres. The war also notably created competition between families and armed militias over their ability to retain their members’ loyalty (Joseph 2004). During the Intifada of 1987 in the Palestinian territories, the fertility of Palestinian women was used as a means to combat Israeli occupation (Courbage 1997). This period was also marked by new matrimonial practices, such as the emergence of “political marriages” transcending social and religious divides (Johnson, Abu Nahle & Moors 2009). Moreover, the preservation of family ties and women’s “honour” is also a strategy to hide the failings of men and their feelings of helplessness in the face of the expropriation of Palestinians in exile (Latte Abdallah 2005). In Iraq, the political and confessional divisions caused by the succession of wars since the 1980s have fragmented the legal norms regulating the confessional Personal Status Code (Ali 2018). The Syrian conflict, which erupted in 2011, has caused a massive displacement of the population, both internally and onto neighbouring countries (Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan), leading to the erosion of parental assistance, but also to the reactivation of pre-existing migration networks (Lagarde & Doraï 2017). One  can also note the emergence of new matrimonial practices challenging the established endogamy within the community (Napolitano 2019), but also the exacerbation of certain practices such as early marriages amongst refugees. The participation of women in the “revolutionary” movement also led to a renegotiation of gender roles within middle-class families (Loris Rodionoff 2019).  

This call for papers on the theme of family and war seeks to further explore the effects of blurring the boundaries between the public and the private spheres, which characterise these conflicts, and on the way in which the political is transposed into the family sphere. It also seeks to understand the strategies for rearranging mutual assistance, and the redistribution process of generational and gender roles. Contributions must be based on original empirical data and can adopt various disciplinary approaches (sociology, political science, history, anthropology and geography). They can focus on Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, the Palestinian Territories, and Iraq and tackle populations directly affected by war, currently or recently, and refugees. The papers can be structured around the following three axes of reflection:

I- Intergenerational Solidarities and Relations

This axis explores the reconfigured relationships amongst the different family generations. Several studies have emphasised the evolution of the “intergenerational contract” (Roth 2010) in times of conflict, with the armed youths questioning the authority of the elders and strengthening their positions within local power structures (Vlassenroot & Raeymaekers 2004, Chebli 2019). Beyond this logic of power redistribution and conflict amongst generations, this axis also tackles the evolution of solidarities and mutual assistance between parents and children, grandchildren and grandparents, as well as amongst the different generations within the same kinship network. 

II- Gender Relations

The second axis focuses on the reconfiguration of gender relations. This topic is addressed in an increasing number of writings (Debos 2013, Bucaille 2011, Thebaud 2014), often putting forward the hypothesis that gender balance is shifting in favour of the emancipation of women from masculine authority. This, incidentally, has been corroborated by the rhetoric of humanitarian actors highlighting the benefits of their action in terms of women’s “empowerment.” This axis seeks to go beyond this binary opposition of gender in order to draw attention to the co-production of femininities and masculinities, as well as on the processes of tasks within the same gender.

III- Matrimonial Practices

The third axis tackles matrimonial practices as a particularly relevant indicator of social hierarchy mutations. A multitude of actors (political, armed and humanitarian) are invested in matrimonial practices and wish to convey their own vision of social and familial order through guidance. In addition to the new forms of union, this axis will further discuss the subject of separation and divorce resulting from the rigidity of political, religious and ethnic divides, as well as forced migration.

Calendar 

Abstracts should be sent to: editor@lebanon-support.org

before 1 November 2020,

specifying in the subject line the title of the CfP: “War: A Catalyst for the Transformation of Families?”

Authors whose submissions have been accepted for publication will be notified within a month by the editors.Final papers should be shared with Lebanon Support for a double-blind peer review by 20 February, 2021.

Submission Guidelines

Lebanon Support encourages contributions from experienced scholars, early career researchers, PhD candidates, practitioners, activists, and civil society experts. Authors can submit papers in Arabic, English or French.  All papers will go through a double-blind peer review process. Priority will be given to submissions that adopt critical approaches to related concepts and categories, engage with a solid theoretical framework, and are based on empirical research. 

Submissions can be in Arabic, English, or French.

Please submit the following details in a Word document/pdf file:

  • Name(s)
  • Title(s) and affiliation(s)
  • Paper title
  • Abstract, not exceeding 500 words
  • Short bio of 250 words and one-page CV
  • Email address

Papers should be between 8,000 and 10,000 words. Practitioners’ testimonies should not exceed 3,000 words, and book reviews should be between 700 and 1,000 words.

For more information about the submission and the editorial process, see here. Please note that Lebanon Support uses the Chicago Manual style for in-text references and the bibliography. For more detailed guidelines, click here.

Editorial Committee

  • Dr. Marie-Noëlle AbiYaghi Co-editor
  • Dr. Maissam Nimer Co-editor
  • Dr. Sbeih Sbeih Co-editor
  • Léa Yammine Communication Editor

Bibliography

Abu Nahle, Lamis; Penny Johnson & Annelies Moors. « Wedding and War: Marriage Arrangements and Celebrations in Two Palestinian Intifadas », Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, Vol. 5, n° 3, 2009, p. 11-35.

Latte Abdallah Stéphanie, « Subvertir le consentement. Itinéraires des femmes des camps de réfugiés palestiniens en Jordanie (1948-2001) » [Subverting Consent. The Journeys of the Women in the Palestinian Refugee Camps in Jordan (1948-2001], Annales. Histoire, Sciences Sociales (Annals. History, Social Sciences), 2005/1 (60th year), p. 53-89.

Ali, Zahra. « La fragmentation du genre dans l’Irak post-invasion » [The Fragmentation of Gender in Post-Invasion Iraq], Nouvelles Questions Féministes (New Feminist Questions), vol. 37, n° 1, 2018, pp. 86-105. 

Bucaille Lætitia, « Femmes à la guerre. Égalité, sexe et violence » [Women at War. Equality, Sex and Violence], Critique internationale (International Critique), 2013/3 (n° 60), p. 9-19. 

Chebli Denia, « La révolte en héritage. Militantisme en famille et fragmentation au Nord-Mali (MNLA) » [Revolution as a Heritage. Activism as a Family and Fragmentation in Northern Mali (MNLA)], Cahiers d' Études Africaines (African Studies), 2019/2 (n° 234), p. 453-481.

Courbage, Youssef. “La fécondité palestinienne des lendemains d’Intifada.” [The Palestinian Fertility Post-Intifada], Population Bulletin, vol. 52, n° 1 (1997): 223–33.

Marielle Debos. Le métier des armes au Tchad. Le gouvernement de l’entre-guerres. [The Arms Trade in Chad. The Government In-Between Wars]. Karthala, 2013.

_ « Les limites de l'accumulation par les armes. Itinéraires d'ex-combattants au Tchad » [The Limitations of Accumulation through Arms. The Journeys of Chadian Ex-Combatants], Politique africaine (African Politics), 2008/1 (N° 109), p. 167-181. 

Gayer, Laurent. « La « normalité de l’anormal » : recomposer le quotidien en situation de guerre civile » [The “Normalisation of the Abnormal”: Resetting the Daily Routine in Times of Civil War], Critique internationale (International Critique), 2018/3 (N° 80), p. 181-190.

Joseph Suad (dir), Arab Family Studies: Critical Reviews, Syracuse, Syracuse University Press 2018. 

_ « Conceiving Family Relationships in Post-War Lebanon”, Journal of Comparative Family Studies, Vol. 35, Spring 2004, n° 2, pp. 271-293 

_ & Johnson, Penny. “Introduction. War and Transnational Arab Families”, Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, Vol. 5, n° 3, 2009, p. 1-10.

Koloma Beck, Teresa. The normality of civil war. Armed groups and everyday life in Angola. Frankfurt/Main, Campus, 2012.

Loris-Rodionoff, Charlotte. « From the Political to the Social: The Speed and Depth of Revolutionary Transformations. », intervention during the conference « Syria Today.

Social, Political and Economic Changes. At the Interface between National Territory and Migratory Spaces », Ifpo-Amman, 29-30 September 2019.

Lubkemann Stephen, Culture in Chaos. An Anthropology of the Social Condition in War, Chicago, The University of Chicago Press, 2008.

Napolitano Valentina, “The Transformation of Family Sphere among Syrians in Jordan”, intervention during the conference « Syria Today. Social, Political and Economic Changes. At the Interface between National Territory and Migratory Spaces », Ifpo-Amman, 29-30 September 2019.

Richards Paul, No peace, no war: an anthropology of contemporary armed conflicts, Ohio, Ohio University Press, 2004.

Thebaud Françoise, « Penser les guerres du XX e siècle à partir des femmes et du genre. Quarante ans d'historiographie » [Understanding the Wars of the 20th Century through Women and Gender. Forty Years of Historiography], Clio, Women, Gender, History, 2014/1 (n° 39), p. 157-182. 

Vlassenroot Koen, Timothy Raeymaekers, “Conflict and Social Transformation in Eastern DR Congo”, Academia Press, 2004.Read More at: https://civilsociety-centre.org/content/war-catalyst-transformation-families-en-fr-ar Copyrights © 2019 Lebanon Support. All rights reserved.

Subjects

Date(s)

  • Sunday, November 01, 2020

Keywords

  • war, family, conflict, refugee, Lebanon, Syria, Palestinian territories, Jordan, Iraq, gender

Contact(s)

  • Valentina Napolitano
    courriel : editor [at] lebanon-support [dot] org

Reference Urls

Information source

  • Valentina Napolitano
    courriel : editor [at] lebanon-support [dot] org

To cite this announcement

« War: A Catalyst for the Transformation of Families? », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Tuesday, October 27, 2020, https://calenda.org/813596

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