HomePhraseology and Paremiology in English

Calenda - The calendar for arts, humanities and social sciences

Phraseology and Paremiology in English

Phraséologie et parémiologie de l’anglais

*  *  *

Published on Friday, November 20, 2020 by Céline Guilleux

Summary

Lexis Journal in English Lexicology – will publish its 19th issue in 2022. It will deal with the topic phraseology and paremiology in English. This issue aims for contributions reflecting the current trends in phraseology exploration, addressing exclusively English phraseology and paremiology and leaving aside contrastive aspects and comparisons with other languages.

Lexis – Journal in English Lexicology mettra en ligne en 2022 son numéro 19. Celui-ci sera consacré à la phraséologie et parémiologie de l’anglais. Ce numéro appelle des propositions d’articles reflétant les tendances actuelles dans la recherche phraséologique et se centrera exclusivement sur l’anglais ; par conséquent, il n’abordera pas les aspects contrastifs et les comparaisons avec d’autres langues. 

Announcement

Editors

  • Ramón Martí Solano (University of Limoges, France)
  • Aleš Klégr (Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic)

Argument

Phraseology, and English phraseology in particular, is probably one of the most progressive areas of contemporary linguistics. Within four decades or so it has moved away from the fringes of linguistic interest to which it was long relegated due to the assumed unsystematic nature of its object of study to step into the spotlight together with corpus linguistics (Gray & Biber [2015]). While what Granger and Paquot [2008] called the “traditional approach to phraseology” was mostly concerned with the narrow field of fixed idioms, their collection and description, the advent of the distributional or frequency-based approach based on language corpora and intertwined with corpus linguistics has completely reconceptualized phraseology and further broadened its scope (see Burger et al. [2007]). It has shown that speech is largely composed of prefabricated, more or less fixed multiword expressions (MWEs), variously labelled as collocations, lexical bundles, (continuous and discontinuous) n-grams, formulas, etc. Central among the goals of phraseological research are the extraction, identification and description of MWEs and the analysis of their discourse functions and exploration of phraseological register variation. Whether focusing on selected multiword units or the whole set of these expressions in a corpus, register, type of text, etc., the approaches are either corpus-based or corpus-driven. The discovery of phraseological units of one type or another in every kind of discourse is something linguistic theories have had to come to grips with. Phraseology is the bedrock of Systemic Functional Linguistics (Ding [2018]), but it also stimulated new directions in Cognitive Linguistics (Fillmore et al. [1988]). The recognition that idiomatic expressions are productive, not (necessarily) fixed structures which permeate ordinary language, is at the core of such cognitive theories as Usage-Based Construction Grammar. The range of contemporary phraseological studies is exemplified by the EUROPHRAS 2017 and 2019 proceedings (Mitkov [2017]; Corpas Pastor & Mitkov [2019]) and more recently by Corpas Pastor & Colson [2020]. In addition to methodological issues of identification and extraction, the papers explore a multitude of other aspects, typologies, patterns and networks, computational representation, cognitive modelling and processing, disambiguation, (semantic and pragmatic) interpretation, to name but a few.

A similar rensaissance has been experienced by the subfield of phraseology, paremiology. Transcending the stage of traditional non-linguistic approaches focusing especially on the collection and categorization of proverbs, paremiology has been firmly incorporated into linguistics (Norrick [1981], [1985]). Taking stock of the present-day situation are such works as Mieder [2007] and especially Hrisztova-Gotthardt and Varga [2015]. In fact, paremiology as the study of proverbs as phraseological multiword units is ever more profiting from language corpora and corpus linguistics just as the rest of phraseology (see Steyer [2017]).

The n°19 issue aims for contributions reflecting the current trends in phraseology exploration, addressing exclusively English phraseology and paremiology and leaving aside contrastive aspects and comparisons with other languages. The following broad areas of research are suggested for the papers with no restrictions upon other related topics:

  • methods of phraseology extraction and identification,
  • representation and modelling of phraseological units,
  • interpretation, processing and disambiguation of phraseological units,
  • discourse functions of phraseological units,
  • phraseological units and register variation.

How to submit

Please clearly indicate the title of the paper and include an abstract of no more than 5,000 characters as well as a list of relevant key-words and references. All abstract and paper submissions will be anonymously peer-reviewed (double-blind peer reviewing) by an international scientific committee composed of specialists in their fields. Papers will be written preferably in English or occasionally in French.

Manuscripts may be rejected, accepted subject to revision, or accepted as such. There is no limit to the number of pages.

Abstracts and articles will be sent via email to lexis@univ-lyon3.fr

Deadlines

  • November 7 2020: Call for papers
  • June 15 2021: Deadline for sending in abstracts to Lexis

  • July-August 2021: Evaluation Committee’s decisions notified to authors
  • November 15 2021: Deadline for sending in papers (Guidelines for submitting articles)
  • November and December 2021: Proofreading of papers by the Evaluation committee
  • January 2022: Authors’ corrections
  • February 1 2022: Deadline for sending in final versions of papers

References

Burger Harald et al., 2007, “Phraseology: Subject area, terminology and research topics”, in Burger Harald et al. (eds.), Phraseology: An international handbook of contemporary research, Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 10-19.

Corpas Pastor Gloria & Mitkov Ruslan (eds.), 2019, Computational and Corpus-Based Phraseology, Third International Conference, Europhras 2019, Malaga, Spain, September 25–27, 2019, Proceedings, New York: Springer.

Corpas Pastor, Gloria & Colson Jean-Pierre (eds.), 2020, Computational Phraseology, Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.

Ding Jianxin, 2018, Linguistic Prefabrication. A Discourse Analysis Approach, New York: Springer.

Fillmore Charles J. et al., 1988, “Regularity and idiomaticity in grammatical constructions: The case of let alone”, Language 64/3: 501-538.

Granger Sylviane & Paquot Magali, 2008, “Disentangling the phraseological web”, in Granger Sylviane & Meunier Fanny (eds.), Phraseology. An interdisciplinary perspective, Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 27-49.

Gray Bethany & Biber Douglas, 2015, “Phraseology”, in Biber Douglas & Reppen Randi (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of English Corpus Linguistics, Cambridge: Cambridge Univesity Press, 125-145.

Hrisztova-Gotthardt Hrisztalina & Varga Melita Aleksa (eds.), 2015, Introduction to Paremiology: A Comprehensive Guide to Proverb Studies, Warsaw/Berlin: De Gruyter.

Mieder Wolfgang, 2004, Proverbs: A handbook, Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Mitkov Ruslan (ed.), 2017, Computational and Corpus-Based Phraseology, Second International Conference, Europhras 2017, London, UK, November 13-14, 2017, Proceedings, New York: Springer.

Norrick Neal R., 1981, Proverbial linguistics: Linguistic perspectives on proverbs, Trier: Linguistics Agency.

Norrick Neal R., 1985, How proverbs mean, Berlin: Mouton.

Steyer Kathrin, 2017, “Corpus linguistic exploration of modern proverb use and proverb patterns”, in Ruslan Mitkov (ed.), EUROPHRAS 2017. Computational and corpus-based phraseology: Recent advances and interdisciplinary approaches, Proceedings of the Conference Volume II. November 13–14, 2017, London, UK, Geneva: Editions Tradulex, 45–52.

Coordination

  • Ramón Martí Solano (Université de Limoges, France) 
  • Aleš Klégr (Université Charles de Prague, République tchèque).

Argumentaire

La phraséologie, et plus particulièrement la phraséologie de l’anglais, est probablement l’un des domaines les plus dynamiques de la linguistique contemporaine. Depuis presque quatre décennies, elle a quitté la périphérie de la recherche linguistique, à laquelle elle avait été longuement reléguée à cause de la prétendue nature asystématique de son objet d’étude, pour devenir un réel centre d’intérêt à côté de la linguistique de corpus (Gray & Biber [2015]). Si ce que Granger et Paquot [2008] ont appelé « l’approche traditionnelle de la phraséologie » se concentrait principalement sur le champ d’étude restreint des expressions idiomatiques, de leur collecte et de leur description, l’avènement de l’approche distributionnelle fondée sur l’analyse fréquentielle dans les corpus a totalement renouvelé le cadre théorique de la phraséologie, tout en contribuant à élargir son champ d’action (Burger et al. [2007]). La recherche a montré que le discours est majoritairement composé de séquences polylexicales préfabriquées, avec différents degrés de figement, parmi lesquelles les collocations, les paquets lexicaux (continus et discontinus), les n-grams, les formules, etc.

L’un des objectifs principaux de la recherche phraséologique consiste en l’extraction, l’identification et la description des séquences polylexicales, l’analyse de leurs fonctions discursives et l’exploration des phénomènes de variation phraséologique en fonction des registres. Que l’on se focalise sur une sélection d’unités polylexicales, ou bien sur l’ensemble de ces unités dans un corpus, registre de langue, genre textuel, etc., les approches sont corpus-based ou corpus-driven. La découverte d’unités phraséologiques d’un quelconque type, dans toute sorte de discours, représente un fait indéniable dont les théories linguistiques ont dû s’emparer.

La phraséologie est à la base de la linguistique fonctionnelle systémique (Ding [2018]), mais elle stimule également de nouvelles directions dans la linguistique cognitive (Fillmore et al. [1988]). La reconnaissance que les expressions idiomatiques sont productives, et pas uniquement des structures figées qui parsèment la langue quotidienne, se trouve au centre des théories cognitives, à l’image de la grammaire de constructions qui est fondée sur l’usage. La variété des études phraséologiques récentes est illustrée par les travaux recueillis dans les actes d’EUROPHRAS 17 (Mitkov [2017]) et d’EUROPHRAS 19 (Corpas Pastor & Mitkov [2019]), et encore plus récemment dans Corpas Pastor et Colson [2020]. En complément de questions méthodologiques d’identification et d’extraction, ces travaux explorent une multitude d’aspects divers et variés qui concernent les typologies, schémas et réseaux phraséologiques, mais aussi la représentation computationnelle des unités phraséologiques, la modélisation et les processus cognitifs, la désambiguïsation, l’interprétation sémantique et pragmatique, entre autres.

On trouve une renaissance similaire dans le sous-domaine de la phraséologie, la parémiologie. En se plaçant au-delà des approches non linguistiques traditionnelles de collecte et catégorisation des proverbes, la parémiologie a bel et bien trouvé une place de choix dans la recherche linguistique (Norrick [1981], [1985]). Dans cette veine actuelle se trouvent les ouvrages de Mieder [2007] et plus particulièrement celui de Hrisztova-Gotthardt et Varga [2015]). De fait, la parémiologie, entendue comme l’étude des proverbes en tant qu’unités linguistiques polylexicales, bénéficie des apports de la linguistique de corpus comme le reste de la phraséologie (Steyer [2017]).

Ce numéro 19 appelle des propositions d’articles reflétant les tendances actuelles dans la recherche phraséologique et se centrera exclusivement sur l’anglais ; par conséquent, il n’abordera pas les aspects contrastifs et les comparaisons avec d’autres langues. Les articles pourront s’inscrire dans l’une des thématiques de recherche ci-dessous ou dans d’autres thématiques connexes :

  • méthodes d’extraction et d’identification en phraséologie et parémiologie,
  • représentation et modélisation des unités phraséologiques et parémiologiques,
  • interprétation, processus et désambiguïsation des unités phraséologiques et parémiologiques,
  • fonctions discursives des unités phraséologiques et parémiologiques,
  • unités phraséologiques et parémiologiques et variation selon le registre de langue.

Modalités de soumission

Votre fichier devra comporter le titre de votre contribution, un abstract ne dépassant pas 5.000 caractères, une liste de mots-clés et des références bibliographiques.

Toutes les soumissions feront l’objet d’une double évaluation à l’aveugle par un comité scientifique international composé de spécialistes de différents domaines. Les contributions seront de préférence rédigées en anglais ou éventuellement en français.

Les soumissions pourront être acceptées, acceptées sous réserve de modification ou rejetées, telles quelles. Le nombre de pages n’est pas limité.

Les abstracts et les articles sont à envoyer en version électronique à lexis@univ-lyon3.fr

Calendrier

  • Novembre 2020 : appel à contributions
  • 15 juin 2021 : abstracts à envoyer à Lexis

  • Juillet-août 2021 : avis aux auteurs
  • 15 novembre 2021 : réception des articles (Consignes pour la rédaction des articles)
  •  Novembre et décembre 2021 : relecture des articles par les membres du Comité scientifique 
  • Janvier 2022 : corrections par les auteurs
  • 1er février 2022 : réception de la version définitive des articles

Bibliographie

Burger Harald et al., 2007, “Phraseology: Subject area, terminology and research topics”, in Burger Harald et al. (eds.), Phraseology: An international handbook of contemporary research, Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 10-19.

Corpas Pastor Gloria & Mitkov Ruslan (eds.), 2019, Computational and Corpus-Based Phraseology, Third International Conference, Europhras 2019, Malaga, Spain, September 25–27, 2019, Proceedings, New York: Springer.

Corpas Pastor, Gloria & Colson Jean-Pierre (eds.), 2020, Computational Phraseology, Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.

Ding Jianxin, 2018, Linguistic Prefabrication. A Discourse Analysis Approach, New York: Springer.

Fillmore Charles J. et al., 1988, “Regularity and idiomaticity in grammatical constructions: The case of let alone”, Language 64/3: 501-538.

Granger Sylviane & Paquot Magali, 2008, “Disentangling the phraseological web”, in Granger Sylviane & Meunier Fanny (eds.), Phraseology. An interdisciplinary perspective, Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 27-49.

Gray Bethany & Biber Douglas, 2015, “Phraseology”, in Biber Douglas & Reppen Randi (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of English Corpus Linguistics, Cambridge: Cambridge Univesity Press, 125-145.

Hrisztova-Gotthardt Hrisztalina & Varga Melita Aleksa (eds.), 2015, Introduction to Paremiology: A Comprehensive Guide to Proverb Studies, Warsaw/Berlin: De Gruyter.

Mieder Wolfgang, 2004, Proverbs: A handbook, Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Mitkov Ruslan (ed.), 2017, Computational and Corpus-Based Phraseology, Second International Conference, Europhras 2017, London, UK, November 13-14, 2017, Proceedings, New York: Springer.

Norrick Neal R., 1981, Proverbial linguistics: Linguistic perspectives on proverbs, Trier: Linguistics Agency.

Norrick Neal R., 1985, How proverbs mean, Berlin: Mouton.

Steyer Kathrin, 2017, “Corpus linguistic exploration of modern proverb use and proverb patterns”, in Ruslan Mitkov (ed.), EUROPHRAS 2017. Computational and corpus-based phraseology: Recent advances and interdisciplinary approaches, Proceedings of the Conference Volume II. November 13–14, 2017, London, UK, Geneva: Editions Tradulex, 45–52.

Subjects

Date(s)

  • Tuesday, June 15, 2021

Keywords

  • phraseology, phraséologie, paremiology, parémiologie, proverb, proverbe, idiome, idiomatic expression, expression idiomatique, fixed expression, set-phrase, expression figée

Contact(s)

  • Denis Jamet
    courriel : lexis [at] univ-lyon3 [dot] fr

Information source

  • Denis Jamet
    courriel : lexis [at] univ-lyon3 [dot] fr

To cite this announcement

« Phraseology and Paremiology in English », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Friday, November 20, 2020, https://calenda.org/816811

Archive this announcement

  • Google Agenda
  • iCal
Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search