HomeCurrent Journals and Research in Architecture, Urban Planning and Landscape Architecture

Calenda - The calendar for arts, humanities and social sciences

Current Journals and Research in Architecture, Urban Planning and Landscape Architecture

La recherche et les revues aujourd’hui, en architecture, urbanisme et paysage

*  *  *

Published on Tuesday, January 19, 2021Tuesday, January 19, 2021 by Céline Guilleux

Summary

Quels sont les milieux intellectuels qui animent la recherche et les revues d’architecture, d’urbanisme et de paysage qui la portent ? L’objectif de ce numéro des Cahiers de la recherche architecturale urbaine et paysagère est de collecter des matériaux et des récits sur des revues diffusant la recherche dans différentes langues. Au-delà de la diversité des cas, il s’agira de construire plus solidement la typologie esquissée ci-dessus. Des enquêtes minutieuses permettant de répondre aux différentes questions posées sont attendues.

Which academic milieus motivate research, as well as the architecture, urban planning and landscape architecture journals that support them? The goal of this issue is to collect the material and narratives of journals that diffuse research in multiple languages. Beyond a diversity of cases, they must more solidly construct the typology outlined above. Expected are meticulous investigations leading to answers to the various questions asked. 

Announcement

N°13 | Current Journals and Research in Architecture, Urban Planning and Landscape Architecture

Editors

Dossier coordinated by Yankel Fijalkow, Caroline Maniaque et Frédéric Pousin

Argument

The chosen editorial line of this issue of the Cahiers de recherche architecturale, urbaine et paysagère falls within the academic field of Humanities and Social Sciences, addressing issues that form its identity. This includes its theoretical register, the materiality of the city, expertise in construction, as well as projects and their design. These questions are very rarely taken up by Humanities and Social Sciences journals, if at all, which tend to investigate spatial dimensions and welcome articles on architecture, urban planning or landscape architecture. Through the choice of such an editorial line, this issue seeks to outline a research profile for the fields of architecture, urban planning and landscape architecture, both in France and on an international scale.

Which academic milieus motivate research, as well as the architecture, urban planning and landscape architecture journals that support them?

The editorial phenomenon bringing to mind the notion of "academic milieu" and, more broadly, an ecosystem of ideas1 that is anchored in either fundamental or applied research as well as teaching. Without necessarily opposing the professional world, this phenomenon also interrogates cooperative working methods in terms of their forms of sharing and intellectual profit2. Above all, however, it questions the notion of academic milieu as well as the circulation of words and ideas3. By highlighting the human foundations of research in urban planning, architecture and landscape architecture, we seek to understand what contributes to the development of journals in this field.

It is also worth looking at the institutions that sustain editorial production, along with economic support. We will question intellectual trajectories that may or may not interact with what takes place within intellectual fields, data collection and representation methods, as well as transmission tools. 

We may already distinguish several types of journals.

- Journals which have been created within academic institutions and which are intended to convey the work produced in this context. These examples meet the criteria of scientific journals; whether we think of the Cahiers thématiques from the Lille National Graduate School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (ENSAP Lille), Princeton University's Grey Room, or Perspecta from Yale University's Department of Architecture, or Housing Studies, which is closely linked to the European Network for Housing Research (ENHR).

- Journals that come from the professional world, which have opened up their columns to academic research. This is the case with Tracés, a partner of the Swiss Society of Engineers and Architects for over 140 years, which discloses academic publications alongside built environment news in French-speaking Switzerland. This is also the case with Urbanisme in France, which broadly echoes the Scientific Research and Development (SR&D) carried out by public institutions such as Plan Urbanisme Construction Architecture (PUCA). PUCA edits a magazine called Annales de la recherche urbaine, which reflects the work of researchers. In terms of landscape architecture, Jola - Journal of Landscape Architecture, which is driven by the International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA), associates current landscape production news with the publication of reviews as well as the disclosure of research-based articles. The RIBA publishes the Journal of Architecture, in addition to supporting the Journal of Architecture and Planning Research alongside other professional associations and organizations. This journal is edited by a scientific publisher called Locke Science Publishing Company. We will also take a closer look at publishers who welcome publications from professional associations or unions.

- Independent journals that establish themselves as research journals, publishing articles carried out by academic researchers. For example, Urban Planning in the field of Urban Sciences, or the Dutch journal OASE, which aims to combine academic discourse and the sensitivities of design practices in a multidisciplinary way comparable to that of the Cahiers de la Recherche Architecturale, Urbaine et Paysagère. OASE claims to bring a critical reflection in which the project plays a central role. We can also reference Ardeth - A magazine on the power of the project which transcends disciplinary boundaries for the benefit of design and project. With academic objectives, this journal aims to open up a field of reflection specific to the theory of project. Some journals aspire to bring together various works and to identify fields that have seldom been identified previously. In this context, we can reference many interdisciplinary journals in the Humanities and Social Sciences such as Urban Studies, Environmental Studies, Histoire urbaine, etc.

In the field of Architectural History, we reference the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians (JSAH), which has been dedicated to the publication of academic research on the built environment as well as film and literary reviews since 1941, allowing to position the discipline of Architectural History into a larger academic context. The journal also supports another “crystallization” of the academic milieu on a global scale; that is, an annual conference which takes place in a different city each year.

Certain journals which have today disappeared, such as Oppositions in the United States or Controspazio in Italy, played a major role in establishing new relationships between practice, theory, history and critique in the 1970s. They tend to constitute a kind of idealized reference that one can question to reflect upon contemporary production.

What understanding of architectural, urban and landscape research emerges from all of these editorial projects? How is this identified?

Contributions to this issue can be distributed amongst three main pathways:

The first concerns the notion of milieu.

The various academic milieus which support these journals are equally comprised of academics, professionals, intellectuals and artists. These different journals have the collective aim to bring life to an intellectual and professional network.

To what extent and on which occasions (seminars, meetings, events) are these intellectual milieus driven to cooperate? How do translation and the circulation of knowledge, expertise and experiments play out4. In what ways and in which contexts do we find overlapping research in architecture, urban planning and landscape architecture?

How are the stated ambitions received in terms of a journal's research? Here, the question of reception and readership is asked. How can a research journal find its authors and readers (titles, content and rubric diversity)?

The second pathway concerns publishers.

Following historical research on books and publishing, the study of the contemporary world of scientific publishing5 with regard to journals of architecture, urban planning and landscape architecture leads us to the following questions. Why and how does a publisher commit to supporting a research journal? What economic strategies are put in place? Which partnerships are forged?

Here, we can identify the factors for emergence and fragility of research journals, or those that support research. Today, with the coming of open access, the relationship to the publisher is evolving. How does this affect the research journals in our field? Or, on the contrary, are they initiating these transformations? 

On the other end of the spectrum, what strategies are researchers and their laboratories developing with respect to publishers?

The third pathway will question the organizations to which journals are linked.

How are these institutions brought to play a role with respect to an intellectual or editorial milieu? What reciprocal added value do the journals and their supporting structures bring?

What defines the theoretical character of a journal? Is it its connection to an academic institution which regulates the process of collecting and evaluating articles? Its belonging to a disciplinary field? Its content? Its authors? The methods shared by authors?

The expected articles will explore one or more of the interactions between an intellectual and professional milieu, one or more of the institutions that back a journal or a publisher. 

The goal of this issue is to collect the material and narratives of journals that diffuse research in multiple languages. Beyond a diversity of cases, they must more solidly construct the typology outlined above. Expected are meticulous investigations leading to answers to the various questions asked.

This issue concerns researchers in the fields of architecture, urban planning and landscape architecture who wish to reflect upon the dissemination media available to them. Alongside the directors and authors of these publications, it concerns epistemologists who study the material fabric of knowledge and its circulation, publishing historians specialized in journals, as well as sociologists and philosophers who study the constitution of academic milieus.

Procedure for the transmission of draft articles

Completed article proposals should be sent by email to the Editorial Secretariat of Cahiers de la recherche architecturale, urbaine et paysagère

before May 15, 2021

to secretariat-craup@culture.gouv.fr

For more information, contact Aude Clavel at 06 10 55 11 36

Expected Formats : articles or “research materials”

Articles, whether in French or in English, must not exceed 50,000 characters, including spaces, bibliography and notes.

Articles must be accompanied by :

  • biobibliographical record between 5 to 10 lines (name and first name of the author (s), professional status and/or titles, possible institutional link, research themes, latest publications, e-mail address).
  • abstracts in French and English.
  • key words in French and English.

The title must appear in both English and French

Editorial Board

  • Chief Editor: Frederic Pousin
  • Manuel Bello Marcano
  • Franck Besançon
  • Gauthier Bolle
  • Enrico Chapel
  • Benjamin Chavardes
  • Laurent Devisme
  • Yankel Fijalkow
  • Sandra Fiori
  • Xavier Guillot
  • Caroline Maniaque
  • Valerie Negre
  • Helene Vacher
  • Andrea Urlberger
  • Editorial Assistant: Aude Clavel

Notes

1 G. Deleuze et F. Guattari, Mille plateaux, Paris, Éditions de Minuit, 1980.

2 R.Sennett, P.-E. Dauzat, Ensemble: Pour une éthique de la coopération, Paris, Albin Michel, 2014.

3 D. Sperber, La contagion des idées, Paris, Odile Jacob, 1996.

4 M. Akrich, M. Callon, et B. Latour, Sociologie de la traduction: textes fondateurs, Paris, Presses des Mines, 2006.

5 J.-Y. Mollier et P. Sorel, « L'histoire de l'édition, du livre et de la lecture en France aux XIXe et XXe siècles », Actes de la recherche en sciences sociales, 126(1), 1999, pp. 39-59.

Coordination

Dossier thématique coordonné par Yankel Fijalkow, Caroline Maniaque et Frédéric Pousin

Argumentaire

Les Cahiers de la recherche architecturale, urbaine et paysagère ont choisi une ligne éditoriale dans le domaine de la recherche académique en sciences humaines et sociales. Elle traite de problématiques qui construisent son identité : le registre des théories, celui de la matérialité de la ville, des savoir-faire constructifs, le projet et sa conception. Ces questionnements ne sont pas, ou peu, pris en charge par les revues des sciences humaines et sociales qui interrogent la dimension spatiale et accueillent des articles sur l’architecture, l’urbanisme ou le paysage. À travers le choix d’une telle ligne éditoriale, la revue dessine un profil de la recherche en architecture, urbanisme et paysage, en France et à l’échelle internationale.

Quels sont les milieux intellectuels qui animent la recherche et les revues d’architecture, d’urbanisme et de paysage qui la portent ?

Le phénomène éditorial convoque la notion de « milieu intellectuel » et plus largement un écosystème des idées1 ancré dans la recherche, fondamentale ou appliquée, et l’enseignement. Sans s’opposer forcément au monde professionnel, il interroge le mode de travail coopératif dans ses formes de partage et de profit intellectuel2. Mais il questionne surtout la notion de milieu intellectuel et la circulation des mots et des idées3. En mettant en exergue le substrat humain de la recherche en urbanisme, architecture et paysage, nous cherchons à comprendre ce qui contribue au développement des revues dans ce domaine.

Il convient également de s’intéresser aux institutions qui soutiennent les productions éditoriales, aux portages économiques éditoriaux, aux itinéraires intellectuels qui peuvent être ou non au contact du monde de l’action sur les territoires, aux modes de collecte de données et de représentations, aux outils de transmission. 

Il est possible d’ores et déjà de distinguer plusieurs types de revues.

- Celles qui ont été créées au sein des institutions académiques et qui ont vocation à véhiculer les travaux produits dans ce cadre. Elles répondent aux critères des revues scientifiques, que l’on pense aux Cahiers thématiques de l’ENSAP de Lille, à la revue Grey Room de l’Université de Princeton, ou à Perspecta du département d’architecture de Yale University, ou encore Housing Studies, très liée au milieu de l’European Network for Housing Research (ENHR).

- Des revues appartenant au secteur professionnel qui ont ouvert leurs colonnes aux productions académiques. C’est le cas de la revue Tracés, partenaire de la Société suisse des ingénieurs et architectes depuis 140 ans, qui divulgue des productions académiques à côté du suivi de l’actualité du bâti en Suisse romande. C’est le cas également de la revue Urbanisme en France qui fait un large écho à la recherche et développement (R&D) portée par des institutions publiques telles que le Plan urbanisme construction architecture (PUCA). Ce dernier édite les Annales de la recherche urbaine qui sont plutôt l’écho des chercheurs. En matière de paysage, la revue Jola (Journal of Landscape Architecture), portée par l’International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA) associe également le suivi de l’actualité de la production paysagiste, à la publication d’articles de critique ainsi qu’à la divulgation d’articles issus de travaux de recherche. Le RIBA publie le Journal of Architecture et soutient avec d’autres associations et organismes professionnels le Journal of Architecture and Planning Research. Cette revue est éditée par un éditeur scientifique : Locke Science publishing company. Nous nous pencherons plus loin sur les éditeurs qui accueillent les publications issues d’associations ou de syndicats professionnels.

- Des revues indépendantes qui s’affirment comme des revues de recherche, publiant des articles produits par les chercheurs du champ académique. Par exemple, dans le champ de l’urbanisme, la revue Urban Planning, ou dans une transdisciplinarité comparable à celle des Cahiers de la recherche architecturale, urbaine et paysagère, la revue néerlandaise OASE, qui se donne pour objectif de faire converger discours académiques et sensibilités de la pratique de conception. OASE revendique une réflexion critique dans laquelle le projet occupe une place centrale. Dans la perspective de transcender les limites disciplinaires au profit de la conception et du projet, citons Ardeth a magazine on the power of the project. Cette revue aux ambitions scientifiques vise à ouvrir un champ de réflexion propre à la théorie du projet. Certaines revues aspirent à faire converger des travaux, à identifier un champ jusqu’alors peu identifié. Dans ce cadre, notons les nombreuses revues interdisciplinaires en sciences humaines et sociales comme Urban Studies, Environmental Studies, la revue Histoire urbaine, etc.

Dans le champ de l’histoire de l’architecture, citons Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians (JSAH) dédié depuis 1941 à la publication de recherches scientifiques sur l’environnement construit, de recensions d’ouvrages et de films et documentaires, permettant de placer la discipline de l’histoire de l’architecture dans un contexte intellectuel élargi. La revue accompagne l’autre action de « cristallisation » du milieu à l’échelle globale, un congrès annuel qui se déplace chaque année, dans une ville différente.

Certaines revues aujourd’hui disparues comme Oppositions aux États-Unis ou Controspazio en Italie, ont joué dans les années 1970 un rôle majeur dans l’établissement de nouveaux rapports entre pratique, théorie, histoire et critique. Elles ont tendance à constituer une sorte de référence idéalisée que l’on pourra interroger pour réfléchir sur la production contemporaine.

Quelle compréhension de la recherche architecturale, urbaine et paysagère se dessine derrière tous ces projets éditoriaux ? Comment celle-ci est-elle identifiée ?

Les contributions à ce dossier pourront se distribuer suivant trois directions principales :

La première concerne la notion de milieu.

Les milieux intellectuels qui soutiennent ces revues sont composés d’académiques, de professionnels, d’intellectuels, d’artistes également. Ces différentes revues ont pour ambition commune de faire vivre un réseau intellectuel et professionnel.

Dans quelle mesure et à quelles occasions (colloques, rencontres, évènements) ces milieux intellectuels se trouvent-ils conduits à coopérer ? Comment se déroule la circulation des savoirs, des expertises et des expériences, les opérations de traduction4 ? De quelles manières et dans quels contextes les recherches sur l’architecture, l’urbanisme et le paysage se trouvent-elles associées ?

Comment les ambitions affirmées en termes de recherche par une revue sont-elles reçues ? C’est la question de la réception et du lectorat qui est ici posée. Comment une revue de recherche peut-elle trouver ses auteurs et son lectorat (intitulés, contenus et diversité des rubriques) ?

La seconde s’intéressera aux éditeurs.

À la suite des recherches historiques sur le livre et l’édition5, l’étude du monde contemporain de l’édition scientifique de revues d’architecture et d’urbanisme et de paysage, nous conduit aux questions suivantes : pourquoi et comment un éditeur s’engage-t-il à porter une revue de recherche ? Quelles stratégies économiques se mettent en place ? Quelles alliances se tissent ?

On pourra identifier les facteurs d’émergence et les fragilités des revues de recherche ou qui portent la recherche. La relation à l’éditeur est aujourd’hui en pleine évolution avec l’open access. Comment les revues de recherche de notre champ sont-elles affectées, ou au contraire sont-elles à l’initiative de ces transformations ?

À l’autre bout de la chaine, quelles stratégies développent les chercheurs et leurs laboratoires vis à vis des éditeurs ?

La troisième direction interrogera les organisations auxquelles les revues sont adossées.

Comment des institutions sont-elles amenées à jouer un rôle par rapport à un milieu intellectuel et/ou éditorial ? Quelle(s) plus-value(s) s’apportent réciproquement les revues et les structures sur lesquelles elles s’adossent ?

Qu’est-ce qui définit le caractère scientifique d’une revue ? Son lien à une institution académique qui règle le processus de collecte et d ‘évaluation des articles ? Son appartenance à un champ disciplinaire ? Ses contenus ? Ses auteurs ? Les méthodes partagées par les auteurs ?

Les articles attendus exploreront une ou plusieurs des interactions entre un milieu intellectuel et professionnel, une ou plusieurs institutions sur lesquelles s’adosse une revue ou un éditeur. 

L’objectif de ce numéro est de collecter des matériaux et des récits sur des revues diffusant la recherche dans différentes langues. Au-delà de la diversité des cas, il s’agira de construire plus solidement la typologie esquissée ci-dessus. Des enquêtes minutieuses permettant de répondre aux différentes questions posées sont attendues.

Ce dossier concerne les chercheurs du champ de la recherche architecturale, urbaine et paysagère qui souhaitent réfléchir aux supports de diffusion qui leur sont offerts. Il concerne, à côté des responsables et auteurs de ces publications, les épistémologues qui étudient la fabrique matérielle des savoirs et leur circulation, les historiens de l’édition spécialisés dans les revues, les sociologues et philosophes qui étudient la constitution des milieux intellectuels. 

Modalités de transmission des propositions d’articles

Les propositions d’articles complets seront envoyées par mail

avant le 15 mai 2021

au secrétariat de rédaction des Cahiers de la recherche architecturale, urbaine et paysagère secretariat-craup@culture.gouv.fr

Pour plus d’informations, contacter Aude Clavel au 06 10 55 11 36

Les articles ne doivent pas excéder 50 000 caractères, espaces compris.

Langues acceptées : français, anglais.

Les articles doivent être accompagnés de :

- 1 notice biobibliographique entre 5 à 10 lignes (nom et prénom du ou des auteur(s), statut professionnel et/ou titres, rattachement institutionnel éventuel, thèmes de recherche, dernières publications, adresse électronique).

- 2 résumés en français et en anglais.

- 5 mots clefs en français et en anglais.

- Le titre doit figurer en français et en anglais.

Comité de rédaction

  • Rédacteur en chef : Frederic Pousin
  • Manuel Bello Marcano
  • Franck Besançon
  • Gauthier Bolle
  • Enrico Chapel
  • Benjamin Chavardes
  • Laurent Devisme
  • Yankel Fijalkow
  • Sandra Fiori
  • Xavier Guillot
  • Caroline Maniaque
  • Valerie Negre
  • Daniel Siret
  • Helene Vacher
  • Andrea Urlberger
  • Secrétariat de rédaction : Aude Clavel

Notes

1 G. Deleuze et F. Guattari, Mille plateaux, Paris, Éditions de Minuit, 1980.

2 R.Sennett, P.-E. Dauzat, Ensemble : Pour une éthique de la coopération, Paris, Albin Michel, 2014.

3 D. Sperber, La contagion des idées, Paris, Odile Jacob, 1996.

4 M. Akrich, M. Callon, et B. Latour, Sociologie de la traduction : textes fondateurs, Paris, Presses des Mines, 2006.

5 J.-Y. Mollier et P. Sorel, « L’histoire de l’édition, du livre et de la lecture en France aux XIXe et XXe siècles », Actes de la recherche en sciences sociales, 126(1), 1999, pp. 39-59.

Subjects

Date(s)

  • Saturday, May 15, 2021Saturday, May 15, 2021

Keywords

  • revue, recherche, architecture, paysage, urbanisme

Contact(s)

  • Aude Clavel
    courriel : audeclavel [at] hotmail [dot] fr

Information source

  • Aude Clavel
    courriel : audeclavel [at] hotmail [dot] fr

To cite this announcement

« Current Journals and Research in Architecture, Urban Planning and Landscape Architecture », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Tuesday, January 19, 2021Tuesday, January 19, 2021, https://calenda.org/830977

Archive this announcement

  • Google Agenda
  • iCal
Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search