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Second Space Age: Competition and complementarity of strategic actors in the “New Space” Era

Deuxième âge spatial : concurrence et complémentarité des acteurs stratégiques à l’ère du « New Space »

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Published on Friday, March 12, 2021 by Céline Guilleux

Summary

The increasing development of space activities has allowed the emergence of new actors alongside traditional space powers. States such as China, India or Japan, aware of the strategic asset they represent, have thus considerably developed their space capabilities in recent years. Ambitious States are joining the closed circle of space nations, such as the United Arab Emirates, which are making them the lever of a consciously structured policy of influence. The most striking, however, is the multiplication of private actors, such as Space X or Blue Origin. The coexistence of States, traditional actors in space activities and privileged subjects of space treaties, and private companies that have appeared in recent years raises questions about the uncertain future of relations between the representatives of Old Space and New Space.

Announcement

Argument

The increasing development of space activities has allowed the emergence of new actors alongside traditional space powers. States such as China, India or Japan, aware of the strategic asset they represent, have thus considerably developed their space capabilities in recent years. Ambitious States are joining the closed circle of space nations, such as the United Arab Emirates, which are making them the lever of a consciously structured policy of influence. The most striking, however, is the multiplication of private actors, such as Space X or Blue Origin. The coexistence of States, traditional actors in space activities and privileged subjects of space treaties, and private companies that have appeared in recent years raises questions about the uncertain future of relations between the representatives of Old Space and New Space. For the time being, these relations oscillate between competition and complementarity: private actors retain an ambiguous status still largely dependent on the State in which they are based while participating in the development of space activities and the technologies necessary for their realization.

Stratégique Journal, published by the Institut de Stratégie Comparée (ISC) invites you to propose your thoughts on the future of the relationship between "Old Space" and "New Space" within the framework of a special issue prepared in partnership with the Institut d'études de stratégie et de défense (IESD) of the Jean-Moulin University (Lyon 3).

Contributions could be part of, but not limited to, the following perspectives, which are not exhaustive:

  • Does the way the current relationship between Old Space and New Space currently arrange itself favours cooperation or competition on the international scene?
  • How has the emergence of private actors impacted the space activities carried out by States? For example, according to the European Space Agency (ESA), 8,950 satellites have been placed in orbit since 1957. More than 2,000 are active, and their number is set to grow further with the appearance of mega satellite constellations, some of which are the result of private initiatives. In this context, how does New Space influence the need for States to locate and identify space objects (Space Situational Awareness or SSA), whatever their nature, and to follow their trajectory?
  • In what way do the developments of New Space constitute an opportunity for certain States in terms of "space catch-up"? Will a strategic equalization, accelerated by a true democratization of space, see bold outsiders catch up with the extra-atmospheric military status of the traditional powers?
  • Are States able to maintain their status as primary subjects of space law? What impact will the New Space have on the 1967 Space Treaty and, more generally, on the development of space law?
  • Is Europe missing the turning point of New Space in technological, economic and legal terms?

Proposals for contributions could concern a complete category of strategic actors, as well as one example in particular, and could include diagrams and graphs to shed light on the reflections.

Modalities and timeline

We invite you to submit your contributions or contribution projects (500 words) to the following address: valentin.degrange1@univ-lyon3.fr

before March 20, 2021.

We will contact you again after the selection of the articles retained by the Scientific Committee on April 5 at the latest. The finalized work of the contributors must be submitted before June 30, 2021. The actual publication of the issue is scheduled for September 10, 2021.

Editors

The coordination of the dossier is ensured by Olivier ZAJEC, Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Lyon 3 (olivier.zajec@univ-lyon3.fr), and Valentin DEGRANGE, PhD student in Space Law at the University of Lyon 3 (valentin.degrange@hotmail.fr).

Places

  • Lyon, France (69)

Date(s)

  • Saturday, March 20, 2021

Keywords

  • activité spatiale, new space, objets spatiaux, droit de l'espace

Contact(s)

  • Valentin Degrange
    courriel : valentin [dot] degrange [at] hotmail [dot] fr
  • Olivier Zajec
    courriel : olivier [dot] zajec [at] univ-lyon3 [dot] fr

Information source

  • Valentin Degrange
    courriel : valentin [dot] degrange [at] hotmail [dot] fr

To cite this announcement

« Second Space Age: Competition and complementarity of strategic actors in the “New Space” Era », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Friday, March 12, 2021, https://calenda.org/854246

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