HomeArtistic Neighbourhoods between Tension and Cooperation

Calenda - The calendar for arts, humanities and social sciences

Artistic Neighbourhoods between Tension and Cooperation

Les voisinages artistiques entre tension et coopération

The Artistic Space of Central and Eastern Europe in its Interactions with the USSR in the Interwar Period

L’espace artistique de l’Europe centrale et orientale dans ses interactions avec l’URSS dans l’entre-deux-guerres

*  *  *

Published on Monday, April 19, 2021Monday, April 19, 2021 by João Fernandes

Summary

In the Interwar period the Soviet administration conceived a new type of cultural diplomacy with the aim of attaining political, diplomatic and propagandist ends. Historians have been mainly interested in cultural experiences and exchanges with Western Europe or/and with the United States, while neighbouring countries are often excluded from studies of these circulations. The workshop, which will take place on June 1, 2021 aims to revisit the artistic and cultural history of the interwar period from the perspective of relations between the USSR and Central and Eastern Europe, through the study of the international career of artists and works of art in the broad sense of the term (painting, sculpture and specifically graphic art productions). The goal of this workshop is to bring together young specialists (doctoral students and early-career researchers) in history of art, cultural and political history and visual studies around this complex, rich and little-studied topic.

Dans l'entre-deux-guerres, l'administration soviétique forme une diplomatie culturelle d’un type nouveau avec pour but d’attendre des fins politiques, diplomatiques et propagandistes. Les historiens s’intéressent surtout aux expériences et aux échanges culturels avec l’Europe occidentale ou avec les États- Unis, alors que les pays limitrophes sont souvent exclus des études de ces circulations. La journée d’études, qui aura lieu le 1er juin 2021, vise à revisiter l'histoire artistique et culturelle de l'entre-deux-guerres dans la perspective des relations entre l'URSS et l'Europe centrale et orientale, à travers l'étude de la carrière internationale des artistes et des œuvres d'art au sens large du terme (peinture, sculpture et plus particulièrement les productions d'art graphique). Son objectif est de rassembler des jeunes spécialistes (doctorants et chercheurs en début de carrière) autour de cette thématique complexe, riche et peu étudiée.

Announcement

Argument

After the October Revolution, artists from Soviet Russia actively regained contact with the art scene in Western European countries. The "pilgrimage" of Western intellectuals and artists to the USSR in the interwar period has been well studied, especially from the perspective of back-and-forth experiences in social and cultural policy, while neighbouring countries are often excluded from studies on these circulations. Under the term of direct neighbours of the USSR it is possible to refer to Finland, the Baltic countries, Poland, Czechoslovakia and Romania, but also Hungary or Bulgaria, countries that are geographically or linguistically close.

Conflicting bilateral diplomatic relations largely affected the development of artistic exchanges, while the first real interlocutors of artists in Soviet Russia were their peers from neighbouring countries with whom they shared a common past (education, teaching and exhibitions). Throughout the 1920s, the movements of artists from the Soviet Republics in these neighbouring countries were based on their familiarity with local artistic circles. Even if a trip to these countries was often perceived by these artists as a point of passage to the great nebula of the Western art scene, it would be useful to study their presence in these countries from a perspective of aesthetic exchanges and cultural interconnections.

The artists who came to Soviet Russia in 1920 pursued various objectives: to learn about new communist experiences, to deepen their artistic and / or political skills. They came without waiting for the establishment of diplomatic relations, and their journey often followed transnational trajectories. Through their rich experiences and language skills, they offered a new opening for the development of artistic production and art history on the Soviet art scene. In particular, these artists were very active in the creation and the functioning of the International Bureau of Revolutionary Artists in 1930, the objective of which was to bring together all the artists close to the communist networks and all the militant artists for social and political causes. This office became a place of reception and integration of mainly German-speaking artists from Central and Eastern Europe.

The period of establishment of bilateral relations between the USSR and its neighbouring countries was marked by the signing of non-aggression agreements with Poland, Estonia, Latvia and Finland in 1932, then by the diplomatic recognition of the USSR by Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria and Romania in 1934. This diplomatic evolution allowed a new impetus in the development of artistic exchanges, above all through the organization of official exhibitions and several trips by artists from these countries to the USSR to prepare these exhibitions. These exchanges could also be motivated by aesthetic, cultural curiosity and / or by political affinities. Through the study of the organization and reception of these exhibitions, it is possible to analyze the political and cultural issues of this art in circulation: the question of minorities, national demands, geopolitical tensions and changes in political regimes. Thus, the organization of the Czechoslovak art exhibition in Moscow in September 1937 was very representative in this context, since it spelt the end for artistic exchanges between the USSR and the countries of Europe in the "age of extremes".

The workshop aims to revisit the artistic and cultural history of the interwar period from the perspective of relations between the USSR and Central and Eastern Europe, through the study of the international career of artists and works of art in the broad sense of the term (painting, sculpture and specifically graphic art productions).

Main themes

The goal would be to create a space for reflection and discussion on the following themes:

  • Rethinking the center / periphery perspective through an aesthetic, political and social prism and the place of artists in this space: What role did the passage through the USSR of an artist or a work at regional and international level play and vice versa? In what form was it possible to integrate these regional exchanges into a broader international perspective on an East-West axis? What would be the legacies of these circulations?

  • The revolutionary aesthetic avant-garde of the 1920s gave way to a revolutionary social avant-garde with a political/moral duty for the artist to engage in the class struggle: What was the circulation of aesthetic ideas across borders? What were the influences and echoes of the October Revolution on artistic movements in Central and Eastern Europe, throughout these connections and interactions? We propose to rethink this already well-studied question through the opening of new archives and specific case studies. What were the subsequent receptions and returns after the emergence of the concept of "socialist realism" in the 1930s?

  • Individual trajectories of artists between local, regional and international level. Artists as mediators between different artistic / political scenes: What role did political convictions, economic interests or aesthetic inspirations play in these circulations? What are the conclusions and consequences of these trips? What place was given to women artists and / or Jewish artists in these exchanges? How did emigrant artists positioned themselves and participated in these exchanges?

  • “An aesthetic obsession with national particularity” in its staging and reception with a variety of art objects in circulation: How did the traditional / avant-garde art and modernism / anti-modernism dichotomies reflected in these circulations and especially in the organized exhibitions? Would it be possible to study the artistic object as a means of pressure or political negotiation, notably through acquisitions of works of art by Soviet authorities?

The purpose of the workshop is to create a transversal research space between history of art, cultural and political history and visual studies.

Submission guidelines

We invite those interested to send their paper proposals (300 words), a short bibliography (3-4 references) and a short biography (5-10 lines) to the adresse artistic.neighborhoods@gmail.com 

before 16th of May 2021. 

The workshop will take place on June 1 2021 in a videoconferences’ format. It is planned to publish the contributions in a special issue of the Pluralités européennes editorial series (Warsaw University Press). Therefore, it is desirable that the proposals have not been the subject of a text published or submitted for publication elsewhere.

Scientific committee

  • Jérôme Bazin, Paris-East Créteil University, Paris.
  • Luba Jurgenson, Sorbonne University, Paris.
  • Daria A. Kostina, Ural Federal University, Yekaterinburg
  • Nicolas Maslowski, University of Warsaw, Warsaw.

Workshop organisation

  • Marija Podzorova, University of Warsaw (CCFEF).

Selected bibliography

ALESINA, Liliâ S., ÂVORSKAA, N. V. (éd.). Iz istorii hudožestvennoj žizni SSSR: internacionalʹnye svâzi v oblasti izobrazitelʹnogo iskusstva: 1917-1940: materialy i dokumenty. Moskva: Iskusstvo, 1987.

BENSON, Timothy O., FORGÁCS, Éva (eds.). Between worlds: a sourcebook of Central European avant-gardes, 1910-1930. Cambridge, London: The MIT Press, 2002.

CLARK, Katerina. Moscow, the Fourth Rome. Stalinism, Cosmopolitanism, and the evolution of Soviet Culture, 1931–1941. Massachusetts, London: Harvard University Press Cambridge, 2011.

DAVID-FOX, Michael. Showcasing the great experiment: cultural diplomacy and western visitors to Soviet Union, 1921-1941. New-York: Oxford, Oxford University press, 2012.

FOFANOV, Sergey. « Internationale des arts. Expositions étagères d’art révolutionnaire en URSS 1920-1930 », inLIUCCI-GOUTNIKOV, Nicolas (éd.). Rouge. Art et utopie au pays des Soviets. Catalogue de l’exposition. Paris : RMN – Grand Palais, 2019, pp. 171-176.

KEN, Oleg, RUPASOV, Alexader. Zapadnoe prigranič'e: politbûro CK VKP (b) i otnošeniâ SSSR s zapadnymi sosednimi gosudarstvami, 1928-1934. Moskva: Algoritm 2014.

LVOVA, E. “Iz istorii sovetsko-bolrgarskih hudožestvennih svâzej i bolgarskoj leniniany (20-30e gody XX v.)”. Sovetskoe slavianovedenie, Moskva: Nauka, 1965, n°5, pp. 15-21. 

LUCENTO, Angelina. “Painting against Empire: Béla Uitz and the Birth and Fate of Internationalist Socialist Realism”. The Russian Review October 2020, Volume 79, Issue 4, pp. 578–605.

PASSUTH, Krisztina. Les avant-gardes de l’Europe centrale : 1907-1927. Traduit par Dominique Moyen, Paris : Flammarion, 1988.

Argumentaire

Après la Révolution d’Octobre, les artistes de la Russie soviétique reprennent activement des contacts avec la scène artistique des pays d’Europe occidentale. Le « pèlerinage » des intellectuels et des artistes occidentaux vers l’URSS dans l’entre-deux-guerres a été bien étudié, surtout dans les perspectives de va-et-vient des expériences dans la politique sociale et culturelle, alors que les pays limitrophes sont souvent exclus des études de ces circulations. Sous le terme de voisins directs de l’URSS il est possible d’évoquer la Finlande, les pays Baltes, la Pologne, la Tchécoslovaquie et la Roumanie, mais aussi la Hongrie ou encore la Bulgarie, des pays proches géographiquement ou linguistiquement.

Les relations diplomatiques conflictuelles bilatérales affectent largement le développement des échanges artistiques, alors que les premiers véritables interlocuteurs des artistes en Russie soviétique sont leurs pairs des pays voisins avec qui ils partagent un passé commun (éducation, enseignement et expositions). Tout au long des années 1920, les circulations des artistes en provenance des Républiques soviétiques dans ces pays limitrophes se basent sur leur familiarité avec les milieux artistiques locaux. Même si un voyage dans ces pays est souvent perçu par ces artistes comme un point de passage vers la grande nébuleuse de la scène artistique occidentale, il serait utile d’étudier leur présence dans ces pays dans une perspective d’échanges esthétiques et d’interconnections culturelles.

Les artistes qui viennent en Russie soviétique dès 1920 poursuivent des objectifs divers : connaître les nouvelles expériences communistes, approfondir leurs compétences artistiques et/ou politiques. Ils/Elles viennent sans attendre l’instauration de relations diplomatiques, et leur parcours s’inscrivent souvent dans des trajectoires transnationales. Par leurs expériences riches et par leurs compétences linguistiques, ils/elles offrent une nouvelle ouverture pour le développement de la production artistique et de l’histoire de l’art sur la scène artistique soviétique. En particulier, ces artistes sont très actifs dans la création et le fonctionnement du Bureau international des artistes révolutionnaires en 1930, dont l’objectif est de permettre un rapprochement entre l’ensemble des artistes proches des réseaux communistes et l’ensemble des artistes militants pour des causes sociales et politiques. Ce bureau devient un lieu d’accueil et d’intégration des artistes surtout germanophones de l’Europe centrale et orientale.

En filigrane, cette période d’instauration de relations bilatérales entre l’URSS et ses pays voisins est marquée par la signature d’accords de non-agression avec la Pologne, l‘Estonie, la Lettonie et la Finlande en 1932, puis par la reconnaissance diplomatique de l’URSS par la Hongrie, la Tchécoslovaquie, la Bulgarie et la Roumanie en 1934. Elle permet un nouvel élan dans le développement des échanges artistiques surtout par l’organisation d’expositions officielles et de multiples voyages d’artistes de ces pays vers l’URSS pour préparer ces expositions. Ces échanges peuvent aussi s’expliquer par une curiosité esthétique, culturelle et/ou par des affinités politiques. A travers l’étude de l’organisation et de la réception de ces multiples expositions, il est possible d’analyser les enjeux politiques et culturels de l’art en circulation : la question des minorités, les revendications nationales, les tensions géopolitiques et les changements de régimes politiques. Ainsi, l’organisation de l’exposition d’art tchécoslovaque à Moscou en septembre 1937 est très représentative dans ce cadre, puisqu’elle sonne le glas des échanges artistiques entre l’URSS et les pays d’Europe dans cet « âge des extrêmes ».

La journée d’études vise à revisiter l’histoire artistique et culturelle de l’entre-deux-guerres dans la perspective des relations entre l’URSS et l’Europe centrale et orientale, à travers l’étude des parcours internationaux des artistes et des œuvres d’art au sens large du terme (peinture, sculpture et spécifiquement les productions d’art graphique).

Axes thématiques

Le but serait de créer un espace de réflexion et d’échanges sur les thématiques suivantes :

  • Repenser la perspective centre/périphérie à travers un prisme esthétique, politique et social et la place des artistes dans cet espace: Quelle place occupe le passage par l’URSS d’un artiste ou d’une œuvre au niveau régional et international et vice-versa ? Sous quelle forme est-il possible d’intégrer ces échanges régionaux dans une perspective internationale large d’un axe Est-Ouest ? Quels seraient les emprunts et vestiges de ces circulations ?
  • L’avant-garde révolutionnaire esthétique des années 1920 laisse la place à une avant-garde révolutionnaire sociale avec le devoir pour l’artiste de s’engager dans la lutte des classes : Quelle était la circulation des idées esthétiques à travers les frontières ? Quelles sont les influences et les échos de la révolution d’Octobre auprès des mouvements artistiques en Europe centrale et orientale, les liens et les interactions ? Nous proposons de repenser cette question déjà bien étudiée à travers l’ouverture de nouvelles archives et des études de cas précis. Par la suite, quelle sont les réceptions et les retours après l’apparition du concept de « réalisme socialiste » dans les années 1930 ?
  • Les trajectoires individuelles des artistes entre niveau local, régional et international. Les artistes comme passeurs entre différentes scènes artistiques / politiques: Quelle place occupent les convictions politiques, les intérêts économiques ou les inspirations esthétiques dans ces circulations ? Quelles sont les conclusions et les conséquences de ces voyages ? Quelle place est accordée aux femmes-artistes et/ou aux artistes juifs dans ces échanges ? De quelle manière les artistes en émigration se positionnent-ils et participent-ils à ces échanges ?
  • « L’obsession esthétique de la particularité nationale » dans sa mise en scène et sa réception avec une variété d’objets d’art en circulation: De quelle manière les dichotomies art traditionnel / avant-gardiste, modernisme / anti-modernisme se reflètent-elles dans ces circulations et surtout dans les expositions organisées ? Serait-il possible d’étudier l’objet artistique comme un moyen de pression ou de négociation politique notamment par des acquisitions d’œuvres d’art par les autorités Soviétiques ?

Modalités pratiques d'envoi de propositions

Nous invitons les personnes intéressées à envoyer leurs propositions de communications (300 mots), une courte bibliographie (3-4 références) et une courte biographie (5-10 lignes) à l’adresse artistic.neighborhoods@gmail.com

avant le 16 mai 2021.

La journée d’études aura lieu le 1er juin 2021 sous format d’une visioconférence en anglais. Il est prévu de publier les contributions dans un numéro spécial de la série éditoriale Pluralités européennes (Presses Universitaires de Varsovie), pour cela il est souhaitable que les propositions n’aient pas fait l’objet d’un texte publié ou soumis à publication ailleurs.

Comité scientifique

  • Jérôme Bazin, Université Paris-Est Créteil-Val-de-Marne, Paris.
  • Luba Jurgenson, Sorbonne Université, Paris.
  • Daria Kostina, Université fédérale de l'Oural, Ekaterinbourg.
  • Nicolas Maslowski, Université de Varsovie, Varsovie. 

Organisation de la journée d’études

  • Marija Podzorova, Université de Varsovie (CCFEF)

Bibliographie indicative

ALESINA, Liliâ S., ÂVORSKAA, N. V. (éd.). Iz istorii hudožestvennoj žizni SSSR: internacionalʹnye svâzi v oblasti izobrazitelʹnogo iskusstva: 1917-1940: materialy i dokumenty. Moskva: Iskusstvo, 1987.

BENSON, Timothy O., FORGÁCS, Éva (eds.). Between worlds: a sourcebook of Central European avant-gardes, 1910-1930. Cambridge, London: The MIT Press, 2002.

CLARK, Katerina. Moscow, the Fourth Rome. Stalinism, Cosmopolitanism, and the evolution of Soviet Culture, 1931–1941. Massachusetts, London: Harvard University Press Cambridge, 2011.

DAVID-FOX, Michael. Showcasing the great experiment: cultural diplomacy and western visitors to Soviet Union, 1921-1941. New-York: Oxford, Oxford University press, 2012.

FOFANOV, Sergey. « Internationale des arts. Expositions étagères d’art révolutionnaire en URSS 1920-1930 », inLIUCCI-GOUTNIKOV, Nicolas (éd.). Rouge. Art et utopie au pays des Soviets. Catalogue de l’exposition. Paris : RMN – Grand Palais, 2019, pp. 171-176.

KEN, Oleg, RUPASOV, Alexader. Zapadnoe prigranič'e: politbûro CK VKP (b) i otnošeniâ SSSR s zapadnymi sosednimi gosudarstvami, 1928-1934. Moskva: Algoritm 2014.

LVOVA, E. “Iz istorii sovetsko-bolrgarskih hudožestvennih svâzej i bolgarskoj leniniany (20-30e gody XX v.)”. Sovetskoe slavianovedenie, Moskva: Nauka, 1965, n°5, pp. 15-21.  

LUCENTO, Angelina. “Painting against Empire: Béla Uitz and the Birth and Fate of Internationalist Socialist Realism”. The Russian Review October 2020, Volume 79, Issue 4, pp. 578–605.

PASSUTH, Krisztina. Les avant-gardes de l’Europe centrale : 1907-1927. Traduit par Dominique Moyen, Paris : Flammarion, 1988.

Places

  • CCFEF - 55 ulica Dobra
    Warsaw, Poland (00-312)

Date(s)

  • Sunday, May 16, 2021Sunday, May 16, 2021

Keywords

  • art and diplomacy, Soviet art, East and Central Europe art, avant-garde, politcal art, Socialist Realism

Contact(s)

  • Marija Podzorova
    courriel : maria [dot] podzorova [at] gmail [dot] com

Information source

  • Marija Podzorova
    courriel : maria [dot] podzorova [at] gmail [dot] com

To cite this announcement

« Artistic Neighbourhoods between Tension and Cooperation », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Monday, April 19, 2021Monday, April 19, 2021, https://calenda.org/866409

Archive this announcement

  • Google Agenda
  • iCal
Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search