HomeThe second economic turn: new approaches to medieval and early modern economic history

HomeThe second economic turn: new approaches to medieval and early modern economic history

*  *  *

Published on Wednesday, September 08, 2021 by Céline Guilleux

Summary

The purpose of this Vox medii aevi volume is to support the developing trend of ‘second economic turn’ and encourage historians who study the Middle Ages and Early Modern period to reflect on the alternative approaches to economic history by providing their vision of medieval and early modern economic development and the diversity of case studies.

Announcement

Argument

In the recent decades, the development of economic history has been determined by the influence of the new institutional economics, as represented by Nobel laureate Douglass North, Avner Greif, and Daron Acemoglu among others. They applied neoclassical economic theory, methods of microeconomics and game theory to the research of social life and historical processes. Studies of medieval and early modern economic history played a remarkable role within this academic tradition. This approach proved to be productive, but therewith it resulted in the total subjection of economic history to the kingdom of economics. The former almost lost its proper historical component, especially in the making of the ‘grand narratives’. Economics in the works of this sort is usually considered as a separate, self-governing entity ruled by natural, nearly biological, laws. It is also believed to be independent of social or political forces, but rather determining them.

Meanwhile, a few years ago, a clear tendency emerged towards the resurgence of historical bases of economic history studies. It manifested itself not only through the increased attention to sources rather than theories, but also in the choice of topics, aims of research, and methods of interpretation. Thus, instead of measuring efficiency of economic and financial practices in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern period, historians tend to take a closer look at the circumstances of their creation, their influence on people’s lives, and their moral assessment by contemporaries. In other words, medievalists and early modernists consider economic life as a product of the volatile balance of power in the societies. The reappearance of these topics has already been described as a ‘second economic turn’. Nevertheless, this does not imply that statistics or econometric methods should be dismissed, but they are now regarded merely as instruments. The purpose of this Vox medii aevi volume is to support the developing trend and encourage historians who study the Middle Ages and Early Modern period to reflect on the alternative approaches to economic history by providing their vision of medieval and early modern economic development and the diversity of case studies.

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Political economy of the Middle Ages and Early Modern period
  • Financial capitalism and merchant capitalism
  • Markets: reality vs theory
  • Monetary policy in the Middle Ages and Early Modern period
  • Cash, credit, taxes, and capitalism
  • Taxes as a result of political struggle
  • Economic policy and the traditions of resistance
  • Medieval and early modern credit practices
  • Governmental credit: consolidated debt of the city-states and royal loans
  • Economics and gender in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern period

Besides, we welcome reviews of relevant books that have been published no earlier than three years ago as well as translations of the most significant texts on economic history into Russian or English. Please, contact the editors in advance to approve of the texts chosen for translation

We also welcome reviews of recently published books (in the past three years).

Submission Guidelines

We invite articles submissions that respond to the above issues and questions. Manuscripts should be between 6,000 and 10,000 words (footnotes and bibliography included).

Guidelines for Submitting and Formatting of Manuscripts

Deadline: Submission March 20th, 2021

Editorial Board

Editor-in-Chief

  • Svetlana Yatsyk– Candidate of Sciences (History), École normale supérieure.

Publisher

  • Kirill Perepechkin– Specialist in History

Academic Editors

  • Grigorii Borisov– Specialist in History; Post-Graduate Student, University of Tübingen
  • Vasiliy Dolgopolov– Specialist in History
  • Iliana Kandzha– MA in History; PhD Student, Central European University
  • Irina Mastyaeva– MA in History; PhD Student, National Research University «Higher School of Economics»
  • Vladimir Tauber– Candidate ofSciences (History), Moscow Kremlin Museums

Editorial Council

  • Ilya Afanasyev — D. Phil. in History, National Research University “Higher School of Economics”.
  • Sergei Agishev — Candidate of Sciences (History), Lomonosov Moscow State University.
  • Nikolai Bondarko — Doctor of Sciences (Philology), Institute for Linguistic Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences.
  • Mikhail Dmitriev — Doctor of Sciences (History), Lomonosov Moscow State University.
  • Andrei Doronin — Candidate of Sciences (History), German Historical Institute Moscow.
  • Sergei Feodorov — Doctor of Sciences (History), Saint Petersburg State University.
  • Sergei Ivanov — Doctor of Sciences (History), National Research University «Higher School of Economics».
  • Maxim Kolpakov — Candidate of Sciences (History), Pskov State University.
  • Evgeny Khvalkov — PhD, National Research University «Higher School of Economics» (St. Petersburg Campus).
  • Tatyana Kushch — Doctor of Sciences (History), Ural Federal University.
  • Mikhail Maizuls — Russian State University for the Humanities.
  • Elsa Marguin-Hamon — PhD, École nationale des chartes.
  • Anastasia Palamarchuk — Doctor of Sciences (History), Saint Petersburg State University.
  • Alexandr Sidorov — Doctor of Sciences (History), Institute of World History, of the Russian Academy of Sciences.
  • Vladimir Tyulenev — Doctor of Sciences (History), Ivanovo State University.
  • Feodor Uspenskii — Doctor of Sciences (Philology), Institute of Slavic Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences.
  • Irina Varyash — Doctor of Sciences (History), Lomonosov Moscow State University.
  • Dmitrii Veber — Candidate of Sciences (History), Saint Petersburg State University.

About the Journal

Vox medii aevi is an academic journal devoted to the Middle Ages and medieval studies. We intend to create an integrated informational space for discussions among the scholars who are interested in diverse aspects of medieval history.

Vox medii aevi is a fully independent project, hence, it has no institutional limits. The Editorial Board and editorial stuff consist of people affiliated with diverse academic organizations. The journal contains research articles and reviews in Russian and English languages, translations of primary sources as well as articles in other languages, and reports of the most significant events in the world of medieval studies. Each issue is devoted to a particular aspect of the Middle Ages and we offer the scholars to participate in a discussion of a certain problem.

The high academic level of the publications is maintained through double-blind peer reviews of all papers by the members of Editorial Board as well as other acknowledged researches and specialists. Our policy involves the publication of up-to-date, original, and high-quality works regardless of the status of their authors.

The journal’s policy is based upon the principles of accessibility and transparency of information, accordingly, all articles are accepted and published free of charge. All published material are redistributed in accordance with the license Creative Commons | Attribution-NoDerivatives (this allows for redistribution, commercial and non-commercial, as long as it is passed along unchanged and in its entirety, with attribution). Copyright remains in full with the authors.

The papers published in the journal are indexed in Russian Science Citation Index and put online in the digital library Cyberleninka which exports them to the international academic data bases Google ScholarWorldCatROARBASEOpenAIREEBSCO A-to-Z etc.

Places

  • Moscow, 21/4 Staraya Basmannaya Street, Building 3
    Moscow, Russia (117638)

Date(s)

  • Sunday, March 20, 2022

Keywords

  • economic turn, economic history

Contact(s)

  • Svetlana Yatsyk
    courriel : voxmediiaevi [at] gmail [dot] com

Information source

  • Svetlana Yatsyk
    courriel : voxmediiaevi [at] gmail [dot] com

To cite this announcement

« The second economic turn: new approaches to medieval and early modern economic history », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Wednesday, September 08, 2021, https://calenda.org/906388

Archive this announcement

  • Google Agenda
  • iCal
Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search